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I am about to put a number of abstract images onto sale through AIM and I am not quite sure how to caption and/or tag them.  They are all microphotography images of (largely) organic matter and whilst the identify of the "raw" material is apparent in some of them, for the most part, this is not.  I have produced these with the aim of making interesting, colourful images and, to some extent, seeing what can be done via this media.  My intention was not to produce scientifically authenticated images for educational purposes, rather interesting (to me at least) patterns and shapes.  Some of these could be used a book covers but there is no category for that use so my questions are these:

 

1)  Should I identify what the raw material is in the caption or just title it "abstract", leaving it to the imagination as to what it really is?

2)  What should I use for the primary category?  Abstract and Background or should I use what it actually is?

3) What should I use for the secondary category (if at all)?  In the case of a colourful Stilton cheese rind, should I use Food?  For a lovely lamb's ear leaf or opaque leaf, should I use Plants?  For a owl's feathers. should I use wildlife?

4) Should I add 'book c over' to the tagging in the hope that somebody might find them for that kind of use?

 

Any advice on the above would be very much appreciated.  Thanks.

 

Sheila

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Images are very very seldom (like almost never) chosen for their image quality alone. So all should be carefully keyworded and captioned with facts.

Try fancy keywords in All of Alamy to see if clients use them at all. And if so, for what.

Set AoA to the earliest date (1 year + the current month).

Set results per page to 100.

Set UCO highest first to see how many searches there have been for a chosen keyword or keyphrase.

Set views lowest first to identify gaps in the collection and find subjects to shoot or ways to shoot a subject. Or just how to keyword them ;-)

Search using the wildcards %% like  %abstract% or %microscop% or %food% or %wildlife% or %stilton% - it's a database thing. Try it without to see what difference it makes.

 

Log out of Alamy and try searching for an image as if you were a client. Say Great Grey Owl. There are no categories (yet), but do take note of all the other things a client could tick or choose: they very seldom do. In stead they may use it as search terms. Only between 3 and 10% -depending on who one asks- of all clients use tick boxes or any other advanced search.

Most used: RF/RM and Releases. Most filters show up in your Pseudonym Summary btw.

 

BTW don't forget to keyword in UK and US English if applicable.

 

wim

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7 hours ago, Sheila Child said:

I am about to put a number of abstract images onto sale through AIM and I am not quite sure how to caption and/or tag them.  They are all microphotography images of (largely) organic matter and whilst the identify of the "raw" material is apparent in some of them, for the most part, this is not.  I have produced these with the aim of making interesting, colourful images and, to some extent, seeing what can be done via this media.  My intention was not to produce scientifically authenticated images for educational purposes, rather interesting (to me at least) patterns and shapes.  Some of these could be used a book covers but there is no category for that use so my questions are these:

 

1)  Should I identify what the raw material is in the caption or just title it "abstract", leaving it to the imagination as to what it really is?

2)  What should I use for the primary category?  Abstract and Background or should I use what it actually is?

3) What should I use for the secondary category (if at all)?  In the case of a colourful Stilton cheese rind, should I use Food?  For a lovely lamb's ear leaf or opaque leaf, should I use Plants?  For a owl's feathers. should I use wildlife?

4) Should I add 'book c over' to the tagging in the hope that somebody might find them for that kind of use?

 

Any advice on the above would be very much appreciated.  Thanks.

 

Sheila

Might be worth some investigation as to how often these type of images sell on Alamy. I have never sold one although I uploaded some early on and have eventually culled most of them. They do not generally appear on the sold images thread AFAIK.

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37 minutes ago, Sally said:

Might be worth some investigation as to how often these type of images sell on Alamy. I have never sold one although I uploaded some early on and have eventually culled most of them. They do not generally appear on the sold images thread AFAIK.

 

I like shooting abstract and backgrounds and have created a separate pseudo for mine. Unfortunately, they don't seem to sell on Alamy, even though there is an incredible selection here, and Alamy often showcases this type of imagery on its homepage. My guess is that buyers flock to the micros for abstract and "design" images in general, which is too bad. 

Edited by John Mitchell

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Yes, I agree. Alamy has some lovely backgrounds, but buyers prefer to get those for pennies. Elsewhere! I have a handful. And only the sound of crickets surround them. :D

Betty

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10 hours ago, Sheila Child said:

Should I add 'book cover' to the tagging in the hope that somebody might find them for that kind of use?

 

Any advice on the above would be very much appreciated.  Thanks.

 

Sheila

My advice would be No to this. It is up to buyers what they choose to do with a photo and up to Alamy what it is licensed for and a tag won’t help IMHO. Rarely have I seen any search terms about anything related to photographic aspects. There is advice about using the terms “copy space” or “copyspace” for images, for example, that have space to do so, but I don’t think I have ever seen a search for these terms. So just stick to what is in the photo.

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41 minutes ago, Sally said:

My advice would be No to this. It is up to buyers what they choose to do with a photo and up to Alamy what it is licensed for and a tag won’t help IMHO. Rarely have I seen any search terms about anything related to photographic aspects. There is advice about using the terms “copy space” or “copyspace” for images, for example, that have space to do so, but I don’t think I have ever seen a search for these terms. So just stick to what is in the photo.

 

But have you tried looking on AoA for %copy%space% ?

And what does a picture of copy space/copyspace look like? Like this 6,833,662 x.

 

wim

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2 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

Yes, I agree. Alamy has some lovely backgrounds, but buyers prefer to get those for pennies. Elsewhere! I have a handful. And only the sound of crickets surround them. :D

Betty

 

As mentioned, Alamy does try to promote these types of images on the homepage, but the competition from the micros is overwhelming to say the least.

 

Might there be a way for Alamy to tap this market without stooping to ms pricing, I wonder.

 

 

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14 minutes ago, wiskerke said:

 

But have you tried looking on AoA for %copy%space% ?

And what does a picture of copy space/copyspace look like? Like this 6,833,662 x.

 

wim

 

I put "copy space" and "copyspace" in my keywords quite often. Doubt if it does much good, though. I used to sometimes add "book cover" or "magazine cover" as well but stopped doing that because I figured it would result in too many false hits in search results.

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1 hour ago, wiskerke said:

 

But have you tried looking on AoA for %copy%space% ?

And what does a picture of copy space/copyspace look like? Like this 6,833,662 x.

 

wim

I stand corrected. What I should have said is that, despite having "copy space" or "copyspace" in my search terms, I have never noticed them coming up in my views. But them I don't tend to take photos like those.

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1 hour ago, John Mitchell said:

 

I put "copy space" and "copyspace" in my keywords quite often. Doubt if it does much good, though. I used to sometimes add "book cover" or "magazine cover" as well but stopped doing that because I figured it would result in too many false hits in search results.

 

I seem to remember there were some contributors using book cover or just cover or covers in his or her pseudonym. Maybe even in the form of a url?

Clients are probably looking for actual book covers in stead of images to use for a book cover.

However people do search for world cities; European cities; African cities; UK cities or hero images as well. Not images of a hero. However there's an agency or contributor that's called Hero Images Inc.

Some people use those terms in their keywords as well: UK cities - 150,000 images.

 

About copy space: once in a while I check whether it's a good idea to use terms like that. Usually because someone here asks or states something about it. Last time was because Alamy blogged or vlogged or tweeted that it would be a good idea to use it.

 

wim

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19 hours ago, wiskerke said:

 

I seem to remember there were some contributors using book cover or just cover or covers in his or her pseudonym. Maybe even in the form of a url?

Clients are probably looking for actual book covers in stead of images to use for a book cover.

However people do search for world cities; European cities; African cities; UK cities or hero images as well. Not images of a hero. However there's an agency or contributor that's called Hero Images Inc.

Some people use those terms in their keywords as well: UK cities - 150,000 images.

 

About copy space: once in a while I check whether it's a good idea to use terms like that. Usually because someone here asks or states something about it. Last time was because Alamy blogged or vlogged or tweeted that it would be a good idea to use it.

 

wim

 

Another agency that I used to deal with suggested that "copy space" should be added to the keywords of relevant images. The term gets so abused, though, that one wonders if it hasn't become counter-productive. Some people seem to put it in almost every image. Thanks for the 'world cities' tip.

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22 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

 

As mentioned, Alamy does try to promote these types of images on the homepage, but the competition from the micros is overwhelming to say the least.

 

Might there be a way for Alamy to tap this market without stooping to ms pricing, I wonder.

 

 

 

Alamy is on record as saying, several years ago on this forum, that while they are primarily an editorial stock photo agency, all subjects are welcome.

 

Maybe Alamy has tapped the market for microstock images. At least it is trying. However it needs more microstock images, not less.

 

If you check out the cover and inside papers of the latest novel by Haruki Murakami called Killing Commendatore there are 4 non editorial shots all credited to Alamy. A blue canvas pattern, a paper over board pattern, an eye, and a moon. Some of you would say these are microstock images.

 

In my opinion if Alamy is to ever become a tier 1.5 or 2 stock agency they will have to break out of editorial and news and offer a more complete range of images.

 

Check out the cover here:

 

https://books.google.ca/books/about/Killing_Commendatore.html?id=wbNMDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=kp_read_button&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false

 

The book is a interesting read, all about art and its effects.
 

Edited by Bill Brooks
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1 hour ago, Bill Brooks said:

 

Alamy is on record as saying, several years ago on this forum, that while they are primarily an editorial stock photo agency, all subjects are welcome.

 

Maybe Alamy has tapped the market for microstock images. At least it is trying. However it needs more microstock images, not less.

 

If you check out the cover and inside papers of the latest novel by Haruki Murakami called Killing Commendatore there are 4 non editorial shots all credited to Alamy. A blue canvas pattern, a paper over board pattern, an eye, and a moon. Some of you would say these are microstock images.

 

In my opinion if Alamy is to ever become a tier 1.5 or 2 stock agency they will have to break out of editorial and news and offer a more complete range of images.

 

Check out the cover here:

 

https://books.google.ca/books/about/Killing_Commendatore.html?id=wbNMDwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=kp_read_button&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false

 

The book is a interesting read, all about art and its effects.
 

 

Interesting to hear about this. I agree, Alamy needs to break out of the editorial mode. I hope they keep trying -- not easy given all the competition.

 

I've been trying to add more microstock-like images -- might as well -- in hopes that the tide will change.

 

 

 

 

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Thank you everybody who has contributed to this thread and also for your valuable guidance.  I will take it all on board and think how best to identify my images.  I agree that there is potential in this area and I hope that some of my work may find an appreciative purchaser.  Only one way to find out!!

 

Sheila

 

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Just as a matter of interest - what does Member's Total Reputation mean?  I have the word Verified and +3 under my photo and I have no idea what that signifies.

 

Sheila

 

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You have received three green arrows. Some of us don't like the system of giving arrows because the red ones can be disturbing. Green ones are nice. Hover over the heart at bottom right to see how to give arrows.

 

Paulette

Edited by NYCat
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Ah - so they are 'likes'.  Got it but why does everything have to be so cryptic?  How on earth does 'verified' translate into 'likes' for goodness sake?  The two words don't even mean the same - or is it just me????

 

 

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Thanks, Edo. Sheila you will see a green arrow on your post -- bringing you up to 4.

 

Paulette

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18 hours ago, Sheila Child said:

Ah - so they are 'likes'.  Got it but why does everything have to be so cryptic?  How on earth does 'verified' translate into 'likes' for goodness sake?  The two words don't even mean the same - or is it just me????

 

 

 

'Verified' just means you exist. :)

 

I've given you another 'greenie'. At the end of the year you will be able to cash them in.

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Thank you John.  Now there's even more new news.  Cash them in? Really? For what?

 

 

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12 minutes ago, Sheila Child said:

Thank you John.  Now there's even more new news.  Cash them in? Really? For what?

 

 

 

Look at all my greenies! I'm going to cash them in for a speedboat!

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Well with my 5 greenies I guess that by the end of the year, provided I get a few more, I may just be able to cash them in for a chocolate bar. 

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