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http://www.greenisthenewred.com/blog/first-ag-gag-arrest-utah-amy-meyer/6948/#more-6948

 

How long before other big industries with friends in government cotton on to the fact that they can escape public scrutiny by pleading harassment or interference with lawful business?

 

Alan

 

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You're quite right, it is worrying.  Seems that more and more those in power on both sides of the pond are trying to protect (or increase) their stash of cash at any cost. This sort of thing is a creeping menace.  The slow removal of rights [allied example] previously taken for granted by citizens of the West is not something I associate with democracy.  Seems to me that in both cases 'the economy' is being used as an excuse to enact these laws.  A cause for concern and a worrying precedent.

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The world is what it is. We have to live within it and change our response as it occurs. I know we will miss Geogphotos input about Darwinism and all the other gaff, but change is not new. As all societies before us have had to live with change, so must we.

 

The main problem as I see it is that change has now accelerated to such an extent that this is very difficult. My pragmistist mind still holds out hope that the industry will sort itself out. It has done in all similar paradigm changes in the past, so my hope is that this will continue.

 

We can wish, hope, activate all we like. But IMO our best bet is to adapt to changing circumstances and try and find new avenues for our profession. Some will win and some will fail, but that is he way of the way of change.

 

Always a pragmatist, Ken

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Pragmatism can only go so far, Ken. Where would photography be if we are no longer allowed to take photos in public? I don't really see much of an avenue for the profession by being restricted to photographing chocolate biscuits in my cellar.

 

Alan

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Keeping quiet about percieved wrongs is the biggest support that the incredibly vested interests in this world have - the time sometimes comes to scream and shout (not literally you understand) - but a great maxim (wish I could attribute it) is: "All that is needed for evil to thrive is for good men to do nothing"  - mind you I like the idea of chocolate biscuits in your cellar Alan - perhaps with my Ovaltine......

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Keeping quiet about percieved wrongs is the biggest support that the incredibly vested interests in this world have - the time sometimes comes to scream and shout (not literally you understand) - but a great maxim (wish I could attribute it) is: "All that is needed for evil to thrive is for good men to do nothing"  - mind you I like the idea of chocolate biscuits in your cellar Alan - perhaps with my Ovaltine......

 

 

That was Edmund Burke, who also wrote said:

 

"Bad laws are the worst sort of tyranny"

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mind you I like the idea of chocolate biscuits in your cellar Alan - perhaps with my Ovaltine......

 

You haven't seen my cellar...

 

Alan

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Alan - I agree entirely - very worrying that there seems to be a gradual increase in laws which restrict public freedom, partly in terms of their effect on our business, but even more so in terms of their effect on what we feel are public rights in a "free country/countries". Surely if the agricultural businesses are doing things in the correct way then they have nothing to fear from street photography, and if they are not doing things correctly then they should be exposed and encouraged to change. What actually appears to be happening is more what one would associate with a police state, not a free country. 

 

Thank you for the link - I have shared it on Facebook and would encourage others with access to social media to do the same. 

 

Kumar Sriskandan

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Very disturbing on many different fronts. Factory farms and slaughterhouses have been trying to keep the public and journalists away from their torture chambers for decades. Now they even have spineless lawmakers on their side. How long before  similar "Oil-gag" laws will be passed, one wonders.

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Some good news: after an enormous public outcry (which crashed the servers hence the difficulty some of you had in viewing the page) the charges have now been dropped.

 

For those who were not able to see the original link: a woman was charged under the new ag-gag laws in Utah for filming a slaughterhouse from a public road.

 

Maybe there is a god after all (only joking...).

 

Alan

Edited by Inchiquin
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Let's hope it doesn't catch on elsewhere! who on earth thinks this stuff up. I can't believe that they think this is a reasonable thing to bring in to the statute books, and what benefit can it possibly bring?  

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Check out the Vermont Eugenics Project in the early 1930s involving the Abenaki indians.  Local government can be more than a little self delusional.

 

For some balance, and because most Vermont people are decent and sensible, try (the original) Ben and Jerry's ice cream and the ground breaking Bread and Puppet Theater.

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