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jpg quality on Alamy's home page


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Does anyone know what resolution Alamy's home page images are?  I don't see any pixelation on my 27" screen and the images load fast.  When I go to other sites which use full screen photo on their home page, on my 27" screen the images look pixelated.  I am trying to have a high res image on my home page but I am afraid that it will load too slow.  Any ideas how to accomplish that?

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You may find that the image 'you' see is a different size on different screens which comes from a web gallery script

 

I use one and it generates a correct sized image dependent on your screen size from a small IPhone to a large monitor

 

Sadly that may not answer your question

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You may find that the image 'you' see is a different size on different screens which comes from a web gallery script

 

I use one and it generates a correct sized image dependent on your screen size from a small IPhone to a large monitor

 

Sadly that may not answer your question

 

That's exactly what the Alamy homepage does. However Keith is right about the longest side: it is 1920px. The height varies with the ratio of the original image: the boxer is 1216px high.

And you have downloaded the whole thing already when you look at it. (So technically you do not have to download it again, only to find it on your harddisk. Which can be not that easy with some browsers.)

Yours may send the smaller version, but Alamy's page doesn't.

 

wim

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 I am trying to have a high res image on my home page but I am afraid that it will load too slow.  Any ideas how to accomplish that?

Most displays, with the exception of Apple's Retina Display, show images at 72 dpi, so there really isn't much reason to use a higher res image. Larger images will sometimes scroll off the screen when viewed with a smaller display. One solution is to use a full screen image and set the browser to auto-resize for a percentage of the screen. It doesn't always look as good as the native size and Image quality will probably vary from one browser to another.

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 I am trying to have a high res image on my home page but I am afraid that it will load too slow.  Any ideas how to accomplish that?

Most displays, with the exception of Apple's Retina Display, show images at 72 dpi, so there really isn't much reason to use a higher res image. Larger images will sometimes scroll off the screen when viewed with a smaller display. One solution is to use a full screen image and set the browser to auto-resize for a percentage of the screen. It doesn't always look as good as the native size and Image quality will probably vary from one browser to another.

 

I thought it was purely pixel dimensions (e.g., 600 pixels x 400 pixels), not resolution (e.g., 200 pixels per inch), which pertinent to web display. Resolution pertains to print output.

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I thought it was purely pixel dimensions (e.g., 600 pixels x 400 pixels), not resolution (e.g., 200 pixels per inch), which pertinent to web display. Resolution pertains to print output.

Technically yes, and while dpi may be incorrect the terms are often used interchangeably. Either way there's no point in using a "higher resolution" image because most displays will only show it at 72ppi.
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 I am trying to have a high res image on my home page but I am afraid that it will load too slow.  Any ideas how to accomplish that?

Most displays, with the exception of Apple's Retina Display, show images at 72 dpi, so there really isn't much reason to use a higher res image. Larger images will sometimes scroll off the screen when viewed with a smaller display. One solution is to use a full screen image and set the browser to auto-resize for a percentage of the screen. It doesn't always look as good as the native size and Image quality will probably vary from one browser to another.

Hi,

The PPI relates to a linear inch - so the PPI is irrelevant when displayed on monitors. The number of pixels is absolute and would be displayed the same regardless of the PPI. i.e. if a 1000 pixel image is set to 72ppi in photoshop or 300 ppi it will be displayed identically - it will be 1000 pixels across and the "size" will simply be determined by the resolution if the monitor.

 

Hope that makes sense ;-) I know it isn't well explained; perhaps someone eles who is more technical will come up with a simpler explanation.

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