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I'm considering getting a geared tripod head, one that isn't too expensive (so no Arca Swiss yet). Any recommendations? I've looked at the Manfrotto 405 and 410 (the XPRO seems a little unstable). I've read a few negative things about the 410 – such as the threads quickly becoming worn. Does anyone here use it?

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Manfrtto junior gear head 410 is excellent and cheaper. I used one for many many years until my tripod fell on a rock and it got jammed. It is solid and rock steay but slow to use but all the geaheads are slow. 

Sung

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Thanks for your reply. I suspect that the 405 is unnecessarily large for the camera I intend to use it with, a Canon 5D, so it's very likely that the 410 is the answer.

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This thread reminds me I've been considering a 410 for some time, have heard good things about it. My ball head isn't ideal for some of the internal architectural photography I do for a property developer.  It should easily handle my Nikon D750 and Tamron 17-35mm f2.8-4, they make a lightweight pair, so no creeping.

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9 hours ago, Thomas Kyhn said:

I'm considering getting a geared tripod head, one that isn't too expensive (so no Arca Swiss yet). Any recommendations? I've looked at the Manfrotto 405 and 410 (the XPRO seems a little unstable). I've read a few negative things about the 410 – such as the threads quickly becoming worn. Does anyone here use it?

 

Not since going fully digital 15 years ago. I still have a 3d head for my 4x5 somewhere though.

The mounting plates of the Manfrottos were okeish then, but hopelessly outdated now. Benro makes a cheap rip-off but Arca Swisss compatible one. Sunwayphoto has a more expensive AS one.

 

Why not shoot a couple of px wider and redress in post?

Most cameras have a built in electronic level and some sort of grid. Most of mine have. Except indeed for the old Canons.

For pp I can recommend DXO Viewpoint. However with some care and time similar results can be achieved in CC. Just not in one go.

Viewpoint is a lot cheaper and more lightweight than a geared head.

 

It's a different case for micro and macro though. Also because you very seldom have carry-on restrictions.

And because one would always use strobes, no problem with the flex either.

But even then it's usually a lot more practical to have the camera on a  (motorized) micro or macro rails and just shift the object until it's in place.

 

wim

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I hate MANFROTTO and GITZO, but the bottom line is that they make the best

equipment,  I currently have three GITZO heads and one set of GITZO legs and

two sets of MANFROTTO legs,  All purchased used so that neither of those companies

made a dime from them.  One GITZO ball head that I am still using I bought for over

$300 USD in 1985, but the $700 USD legs that I bought, when Karl Heitz was the U.S.

distributor, quit working in 1992,  when I bought them they were guaranteed for "One

Lifetime and One Reincarnation,  When I got back to the U.S. I sent the broken legs

to MANFROTTO, which had taken over the U.S. distribution of GITZO, and they wanted

$300 to fix the legs......

 

Again the problem is that these two companies make the very best heads and legs

available. 

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8 hours ago, wiskerke said:

Not since going fully digital 15 years ago. I still have a 3d head for my 4x5 somewhere though.

The mounting plates of the Manfrottos were okeish then, but hopelessly outdated now. Benro makes a cheap rip-off but Arca Swisss compatible one. Sunwayphoto has a more expensive AS one.

 

Why not shoot a couple of px wider and redress in post?

Most cameras have a built in electronic level and some sort of grid. Most of mine have. Except indeed for the old Canons.

For pp I can recommend DXO Viewpoint. However with some care and time similar results can be achieved in CC. Just not in one go.

Viewpoint is a lot cheaper and more lightweight than a geared head.

 

It's a different case for micro and macro though. Also because you very seldom have carry-on restrictions.

And because one would always use strobes, no problem with the flex either.

But even then it's usually a lot more practical to have the camera on a  (motorized) micro or macro rails and just shift the object until it's in place.

 

wim

 

Thanks for the suggestions. I use a Manfrotto XPRO ball head now, which is OK for some things, but frustrating to use when you want to make precise adjustments as the camera always moves a little after you've locked the position and let go of the camera.

 

I've looked at the Benro, though I didn't know about the Sunwayfoto head. They look OK, and I saw a couple of favourable mentions of the Benro head, but for various reasons I'm a little sceptical of buying stuff from Chinese companies.

 

As for the plate, I saw that Hejnarphoto makes Arca Swiss adapters for Manfrotto heads, so at least upgrading is possible.

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Manfrotto 405 - have used mine most days for at least 20 years both on location and in the studio, no sign of the threads wearing yet

 

Alex

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I've had 410 for over 15 years, and have found them a delight to use after trying all sorts to find stable heads without creep when locking down.

 

My original one is a bit stiffer now but still usable, and I have a new one (6 months oldish).

 

I've done the Hejnar adaptation and it's good, although fairly expensive. Where I've found it useful is I can now point the camera straight upwards by reversing it on the arca plate. Much better than removing centre column and putting it at 90 degrees. You'll find pointing camera upwards very limiting on the 410.

 

If you need extra plates for other cameras or lenses let me know as I now have quite a number gathering dust, shame you've ordered already as I have a spare new 410 also, could've shaved some money off for you, and will do for the plates.

 

Any questions feel free to ask.

 

Cheers

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4 hours ago, Marsh said:

I've had 410 for over 15 years, and have found them a delight to use after trying all sorts to find stable heads without creep when locking down.

 

My original one is a bit stiffer now but still usable, and I have a new one (6 months oldish).

 

I've done the Hejnar adaptation and it's good, although fairly expensive. Where I've found it useful is I can now point the camera straight upwards by reversing it on the arca plate. Much better than removing centre column and putting it at 90 degrees. You'll find pointing camera upwards very limiting on the 410.

 

If you need extra plates for other cameras or lenses let me know as I now have quite a number gathering dust, shame you've ordered already as I have a spare new 410 also, could've shaved some money off for you, and will do for the plates.

 

Any questions feel free to ask.

 

Cheers

 

Thanks for the offer.

I've received it now; haven't had much time to use it yet though. Compared to my old ballhead Manfrotto, the 410's incredibly easy to adjust, but not quite as portable to say the least.

I'll probably get the Hejnar adapter next time I'm in the US, as the plate that comes with the head is rather large and clunky.

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21 minutes ago, Thomas Kyhn said:

 

Thanks for the offer.

I've received it now; haven't had much time to use it yet though. Compared to my old ballhead Manfrotto, the 410's incredibly easy to adjust, but not quite as portable to say the least.

I'll probably get the Hejnar adapter next time I'm in the US, as the plate that comes with the head is rather large and clunky.

 

I have received Hejnar clamps directly to Europe without a problem. You would only need the plate which is $68. Shipping is US $15.44  =52 cts more than to the Netherlands ;-)

Personally I would mount a smaller clamp.

If you look closely you could probably figure out a diy option as well, but most people don't take the drill/hacksaw to their new items on the first day ;-)

And the Hejnar (and Kirk) option is quite clean.

 

wim

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, wiskerke said:

I have received Hejnar clamps directly to Europe without a problem. You would only need the plate which is $68. Shipping is US $15.44  =52 cts more than to the Netherlands ;-)

Personally I would mount a smaller clamp.

If you look closely you could probably figure out a diy option as well, but most people don't take the drill/hacksaw to their new items on the first day ;-)

And the Hejnar (and Kirk) option is quite clean.

 

The only thing is when ordering things from from a non-EU country you risk having to pay an import fee (in addition to the import tax); at least that's happened a few times when I've ordered books from the US.

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37 minutes ago, Thomas Kyhn said:

 

The only thing is when ordering things from from a non-EU country you risk having to pay an import fee (in addition to the import tax); at least that's happened a few times when I've ordered books from the US.

 

Yes the trick is to find out what the minimum allowed sum is for a certain category.

Under a certain amount even VAT is waived. Usually around the price of a CD.

It sometimes pays to break up an order to the US even if that incurs more shipping costs.

However if you're getting over the threshold anyway, combining shipments may reduce costs and reduce hassle by paying in one go.

In any case: European VAT is always the highest; import tax is usually only 5% or less. If you buy in a shop in the US you will usually have to pay sales tax. Their VAT (not literally), which is a lot lower than ours. However when you take it with you and cross the border back into Denmark and you're bringing in goods over a certain total amount, you will still have to pay Danish VAT and import tax. If caught.

If caught used to apply to buying from internet shops also, and some Chinese may still put gift on the package. But since the DHL's and Fedex's of the world have been entrusted with the collection of duties, going un-caught sadly doesn't happen very often any more.

 

About US sales tax: it only applies to sales in a state, so if you order something from a different state or a different country, like over the internet, you do not pay sales tax. It's only a small amount compared to ours, but still.

 

wim

 

 

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41 minutes ago, wiskerke said:

when you take it with you and cross the border back into Denmark and you're bringing in goods over a certain total amount, you will still have to pay Danish VAT and import tax. If caught

 

When arriving in Denmark by boat or plane from a non-EU country, the limit is DKK 3.250 (around €435), so bringing a Hejnar adapter is no problem. I've heard about people whose bags were checked, but I've never experienced it myself.

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I needed to pay import duty on the Hejnar, had to visit the post office depot before I could receive the package.

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