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I'm going to do a freebie project for a mental health sports charity.  The images may be used in all manner of situations, but primarily in their new website and across social media platforms.  The organiser would like to use some close-ups of various items of sports equipment and some images of individuals/groups playing the sports.

 

I'm very keen to help out, but, being cautious, have raised the following points:

 

  • Close-ups may be an issue: perhaps use unbranded items or remove brands/logos in Photoshop?  Removing brands might in itself be an issue?  Seek permission from the businesses? (really not sure about this last one!)
  • Images of (potentially vulnerable) people could raise problems: get consent forms from them and/or a carer, if appropriate.
  • Images taken in sporting venues might require the permission of the manager/owner of the venue.

 

Is there anything I have missed?  Am I being over-cautious?  Does anyone have any further suggestions?  Any and all help would be much appreciated.  Many thanks. :)

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As you're working for free, make it the charity's responsibility to clear IP, consents and permissions as required.

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Logically, if you're just handing over the images to the charity for them to use then the onus should be on them to ensure permissions etc, I would have thought.

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1 hour ago, Avpics said:

Logically, if you're just handing over the images to the charity for them to use then the onus should be on them to ensure permissions etc, I would have thought.

You are the photographer, not the publisher. It's the publisher's responsibility to ensure that what goes online/into print is all OK and above board.

Obviously, as you're doing this on a charitable basis, you'll make this as easy as you can for them, but nonetheless, you're just supplying the photos.

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Not sure what country you are in but regards the legal position in the UK - you do need permission/licencing from the owner of any property you are shooting on - for most sports venues this is fairly easy to find and gain.
If the event being shot is open to the public - or if the event is taking place in a public place - then no permission of any person is required legally to take their picture.  However morally ethically,  and to maintain good customer relations, it is preferred to ask first and if there is a strong no then do not take.  If the event is invitation only on private property then it gets more complicated - however, I would expect that at a charity event for vulnerable people that there would be an individual in charge of safeguarding who would know what is and is not allowed.

As a general rule follow norms of politeness - I regularly shoot youth sports, of which a reasonable amount is on private property ie education establishments.  When I am there at the invite of the "home" team I always speak to the away coach and make sure they are happy for photographs to be taken and if there are any safeguarding issues I need to comply with.  If I am travelling with the "away" team I introduce myself to the home coach and "offer my services" as it were, basically asking permission to shoot.  I have never had any team object to photography or refuse my offer when away from home.   No doubt if I swanned about clicking left right and centre acting like I was god or something there would be objections - but ordinary politeness takes care of everything.

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6 hours ago, spacecadet said:

As you're working for free, make it the charity's responsibility to clear IP, consents and permissions as required.

 

Better have them arrange all the access, set up the appointments, and negotiate releases for yourself too and the possibility to use the (used and/or unused) images for stock. This way you will probably get access to a lot more and different places than going out on your own.

Besides it's so rewarding to have a secretary on the phone behind a desk somewhere. Even for a short while. ;-)

 

wim

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Over the years I've done a number of "Charity Events" for no charge, but what I have done is have the organizer

get all the releases from individuals participating in the event.  One organization that I've done several events

for has just posted signs at all entrances stating that by entering "you may be photographed or recorded and

those images may be published."  Keep in mind that this was in the U.S. but an attorney that I spoke with said

it would holdup in court?  I also always take a photo of the sign at the entrance.

 

Many of these events can make good stock and if it was me doing it, If I found someone that would make or

that I have already made a valuable image of I would explain who I was and what I was doing and then get their

details and a model release from them.

 

Chuck

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On 11/12/2018 at 22:10, Starsphinx said:

 However morally ethically,  and to maintain good customer relations, it is preferred to ask first and if there is a strong no then do not take. 

With respect, that is making it worse for other photographers.  If anyone tries to stop me photographing in a public place, they're told where to go.  No one stops me photographing in a public place, simple as.  

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10 hours ago, Colblimp said:

With respect, that is making it worse for other photographers.  If anyone tries to stop me photographing in a public place, they're told where to go.  No one stops me photographing in a public place, simple as.  

Yes but the question is not about general photography in a public place - it is about specific contracted photography (whether paid or unpaid when you are invited or asked you are contracted) in a possibly private property (sports arenas are private property - during events with paid entry they may act as public areas but during private or invitation only events they are most definitely private).

So when a photographer has been asked to shoot at a specific event, especially one including vulnerable people,  there are moral ethical and customer relation elements to consider.

In a totally public place, I agree with you - I do a small amount of work on news involving emergency services and have had "requests" from both police and paramedics to stop shooting.   I didn't (although with the police certain officers were pixelated because good reason was given).  I have also had rather irate members of the public ask me to stop - which were as tactfully as possible totally ignored.  I appreciate that at such times people are incredibly distressed and the last thing they want is their picture taken and I do not take their anger personally - but in that situation, my job is to record news - so I record it.  

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11 hours ago, Colblimp said:

If anyone tries to stop me photographing in a public place, they're told where to go.  No one stops me photographing in a public place, simple as.  

After some recent (and now sadly frequent) stabbings we've had dispersal orders in place around Southend's town centre. Whilst taking photographs to illustrate the story I was rough-handled by a typical Essex thug who thought I was taking shots of his 'bird' who apparently has plans to be a supermodel and I'd need to pay a large fee for the 'privilege'. Thankfully the police who were around to enforce the order came to my rescue and we agreed that it would be better for everyone if I walked away. There's a limit.

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On 11/14/2018 at 09:55, Avpics said:

 

After some recent (and now sadly frequent) stabbings we've had dispersal orders in place around Southend's town centre. Whilst taking photographs to illustrate the story I was rough-handled by a typical Essex thug who thought I was taking shots of his 'bird' who apparently has plans to be a supermodel and I'd need to pay a large fee for the 'privilege'. Thankfully the police who were around to enforce the order came to my rescue and we agreed that it would be better for everyone if I walked away. There's a limit.

Wow, glad you where ok 

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On 13/11/2018 at 22:40, Colblimp said:

With respect, that is making it worse for other photographers.  If anyone tries to stop me photographing in a public place, they're told where to go.  No one stops me photographing in a public place, simple as.  

It is getting more and more difficult.  On one hand thugs who don’t like me taking pictures and on the other hand the police who (normally politely) ask me to stop as I am aggravating the situation.  I am covering an event tonight where there will be public disorder and I have advised the local police that I will be working the occasion.  Last week covering the Brexit demos outside the House of Commons, one officer was hostile towards the media covering the event and “moved us on” for causing an obstruction.    Most police are fine but some still views us on a spectrum of a nuisance to aggravating the situation and “the enemy”   But I do worry about the thugs more.  

Edited by IanDavidson
Typo
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2 hours ago, IanDavidson said:

It is getting more and more difficult.  On one hand thugs who don’t like me taking pictures and on the other hand the police who (normally politely) ask me to stop as I am aggravating the situation.  I am covering an event tonight where there will be public disorder and I have advised the local police that I will be working the occasion.  Last week covering the Brexit demos outside the House of Commons, one officer was hostile towards the media covering the event and “moved us on” for causing an obstruction.    Most police are fine but some still views us on a spectrum of a nuisance to aggravating the situation and “the enemy”   But I do worry about the thugs more.  

The irony being in a lot of modern disorder cases if the press did not turn up and media did not cover it the participants would give up because of not getting their five minutes of fame.

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