JeffGreenberg

trick for eliminating noise from very high ISO images

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Anyone familiar with this?:

(post before & after examples?)

 

https://www.dpreview.com/articles/0727694641/here-s-how-to-pixel-shift-with-any-camera

 

Not only eliminates noise, but gives FF detail to small sensor images...

Note: one purposely slightly shifts camera each of 4 images...

Edited by JeffGreenberg

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19 minutes ago, JeffGreenberg said:

Anyone familiar with this?:

(post before & after examples?)

 

https://www.dpreview.com/articles/0727694641/here-s-how-to-pixel-shift-with-any-camera

 

Not only eliminates noise, but gives FF detail to small sensor images...

Note: one purposely slightly shifts camera each of 4 images...

 

Yes. Stuff has to be perfectly still over the entire range. Passers-by and driving cars will/can be eliminated, but moving branches cause blur. Moderate waves can turn out ok though.

My max until now is a 38 image stack. Much easier now since the RX100 does 24 fps for a couple of seconds. That's stills not video!

However you do need serious computing power. Even with a fully loaded (i7-8700K @ 3.7Ghz - 32GB - ssd) machine, I'm having coffee breaks ;-)

 

Pixel shift is so minute that there's no way one can do that manually. Even on a tripod there will be so much movement and uneven distribution of noise that stacking will be an improvement over a single shot. However fewer images may cause more blur. The more images in the stack the better. Remove slightly blurred images beforehand (look at the size of the jpg - always shoot RAW+jpg - larger is sharper in 98% of cases).

 

wim

 

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Never done stacking, only Layer > Flatten Image after lens correction...

Need dumbed down tutorial for all involved.

This could be interesting way to take hand held city street night scenes very high ISO, say, 12800.

Wouldn't mind some ghosting as it might add time-exposure effects to people-vehicles...?

Did similar with film-tripod via multiple exposures, dividing single correct exposure time by # exposures

to determine correct time-fstop for each multiple...

Edited by JeffGreenberg

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"trick for eliminating noise from very high ISO images"

 

I'm not sure if your Sony has "handheld twilight mode", but if it does I suggest you try it.

On the Sony RX100 it's amazing. It takes a burst of shots with short exposure and high ISO and combines them to reduce noise.

It's all done automatically. It doesn't increase resolution but it does reduce noise and blur to produce a single jpg (no RAW).

I just took some handheld shots inside Cathedral Cave in English Lake District and have been impressed how well they've come out.

 

Mark

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2 minutes ago, M.Chapman said:

"trick for eliminating noise from very high ISO images"

 

I'm not sure if your Sony has "handheld twilight mode", but if it does I suggest you try it.

On the Sony RX100 it's amazing. It takes a burst of shots with short exposure and high ISO and combines them to reduce noise.

It's all done automatically. It doesn't increase resolution but it does reduce noise and blur to produce a single jpg (no RAW).

I just took some handheld shots inside Cathedral Cave in English Lake District and have been impressed how well they've come out.

 

Mark

 

The Sony a6000 series and earlier NEX cameras also have handheld twilight mode. I too find that it works well for handheld street shots, interiors, etc.

 

 

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1 hour ago, JeffGreenberg said:

This could be interesting way to take hand held city street night scenes very high ISO, say, 12800.

 

Actually this is what the hand held twilight in the RX100 does.  Doesn't the RX10 have the same setting?

 

The manual about stacking that your article refers to is very detailed: https://petapixel.com/2015/02/21/a-practical-guide-to-creating-superresolution-photos-with-photoshop/

There are stand alone programs/apps as well. It's a technique that originates in the astro world. I think I have seen it mentioned in 2003 for the first time and it was a pretty well established technique by then. The stand alone programs are very small and much faster than the CC route.

 

wim

 

 

 

 

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Thanks for link!

Tried HHT.  It takes burst of 4 exposures & blends into one.

Someone reports on DPR forum that it applies NR to all

four images & is NOT a pixel shifting function.

Does that mean less noise but softer than if

one took regular burst of four images &

pixel-shift-merged them via CC2018?

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14 hours ago, JeffGreenberg said:

Thanks for link!

Tried HHT.  It takes burst of 4 exposures & blends into one.

Someone reports on DPR forum that it applies NR to all

four images & is NOT a pixel shifting function.

Does that mean less noise but softer than if

one took regular burst of four images &

pixel-shift-merged them via CC2018?

 

The blending in HHT does align the images before blending them and it seems to be very good at doing it. I've been very surprised at the low noise and sharpness of the end result. I'm not sure how localised the alignment is (i.e. is realignment of pixels the same over the entire frame or allows local variation). Best way to find the answer to your question (HHT vs CC2018) might be try some test shots under the sort of conditions you are targeting (ie. light level, focal length, camera holding method).

 

Mark

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4 hours ago, M.Chapman said:

 

The blending in HHT does align the images before blending them and it seems to be very good at doing it. I've been very surprised at the low noise and sharpness of the end result. I'm not sure how localised the alignment is (i.e. is realignment of pixels the same over the entire frame or allows local variation). Best way to find the answer to your question (HHT vs CC2018) might be try some test shots under the sort of conditions you are targeting (ie. light level, focal length, camera holding method).

 

Mark

 

Good idea.

Photoshop is actually quite bad at aligning. I used to have an HDR program that allowed for points to be pinned to the underlying image. That worked surprisingly well.

Puppet Warp and Perspective Warp are a bit like that, except those are horrible tools that only remind me how good that HDR program was.

 

wim

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9 hours ago, M.Chapman said:

 

The blending in HHT does align the images before blending them and it seems to be very good at doing it. I've been very surprised at the low noise and sharpness of the end result. I'm not sure how localised the alignment is (i.e. is realignment of pixels the same over the entire frame or allows local variation). Best way to find the answer to your question (HHT vs CC2018) might be try some test shots under the sort of conditions you are targeting (ie. light level, focal length, camera holding method).

 

Mark

 

Just been out to test HHT in the dark with my RX100 mk1.

 

Out of seven images taken I got two which could be keepers. The other five suffered from blur, but with no or very little noise.

 

If I cannot achieve a better hit rate than 2 out of seven I don't think I'll bother.

 

Allan

 

 

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My strategy, if I can remember to do it, per photo opp:

a. shoot a couple higher ISO image as usual

b. then immediately shoot a few HHT function

c. compare later whilst processing, keep best

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