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On 11/9/2018 at 15:41, Joseph Clemson said:

 

I really find laptops infuriating and impossible to use productively. The touchpad and/or mouse buttons are awkward to use, the keyboards are fiddly and less responsive. Balancing a laptop on my knees just makes working a pain, sometimes literally, in the neck and using one  on a table is almost always a poor compromise for a  proper desk.  I think I'll keep my desk, swivel chair and desktop computer where I can work efficiently and in a degree of comfort.  And as for tablets......

I’m with you. iMac for all photo editing and tagging. But I use my iPad for AIM after uploads are approved. It’s small, light and easy to balance on my knees/lap whil comfortable in my easy chair. With it, I do the Optional page, selecting supertags, yada, yada. (Also the forum)

I tried the laptop and hated it. For your reasons, Joseph. And I’ll add another reason. My laptop got warm enough it was uncomfortably  hot on my legs.

Betty

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That's an interesting, and mostly considered set of replies. Thank you all very much for your input.

 

Firstly, this was certainly not intended to be any kind of Canon vs Nikon debate.

 

As I stated in my original post, no way am I going to give up my iMac desktop for post, but, with advancing years and long standing lower back  issues caused by the bravado and stupidity of youth trying to emulate Barry sheene, I cant sit for long periods at a desk, gone are the days of working my way through 20, 30, 40 or more pictures into the early hours of the morning.

 

I have an old MacBook Pro that I bought back in early 2013, a great old work horse and still working fine, but no good for PP, its so old that it wouldn't support Adobe CC anyway. I have been wondering whether its worth replacing with a newer model that will support Adobe CC in order to, periodically, relieve the stress of sitting at a desk.

 

Thank you all, your replies have helped.

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I usually do pretty minimal editing to my images and always do it on a acer laptop that’s a few years old.

i find sitting in my cushy chair with laptop comfortable, I think I would get tired of sitting at a desk for a longer period of time.

i honestly long for the days when you could take your rolls of film in, and pick up the prints a couple days later.

while I do very basic editing, it still takes up lots of time.

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Laptop for me. I mostly contribute to live news so it's pretty much vital that I have a portable computer. I would like to move to an iPad but after using one a couple of times to send out images to live news it proved really inefficient, mainly because there isn't a good enough app (that I know of) that allows multiple IPTC headline/caption editing. Lightroom mobile app is great for editing really quickly, but captions have to be added one at a time, and when I've got multiple images to headline and caption, it takes the biscuit.

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43 minutes ago, Richard Coombs said:

That's an interesting, and mostly considered set of replies. Thank you all very much for your input.

 

Firstly, this was certainly not intended to be any kind of Canon vs Nikon debate.

 

As I stated in my original post, no way am I going to give up my iMac desktop for post, but, with advancing years and long standing lower back  issues caused by the bravado and stupidity of youth trying to emulate Barry sheene, I cant sit for long periods at a desk, gone are the days of working my way through 20, 30, 40 or more pictures into the early hours of the morning.

 

I have an old MacBook Pro that I bought back in early 2013, a great old work horse and still working fine, but no good for PP, its so old that it wouldn't support Adobe CC anyway. I have been wondering whether its worth replacing with a newer model that will support Adobe CC in order to, periodically, relieve the stress of sitting at a desk.

 

Thank you all, your replies have helped.

 

A lot of firms, apparently, now offer the chance for their personnel who work computers most of the day to stand while working on the keyboard etc by means of a rising desk. I believe this system was introduced because of some regulation or advice offered by the Health & safety at work.

 

Allan

 

 

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My main machine is a late 2015 27 inch 5K iMac.   I've recently bought a middle end Dell  laptop which doesn't have a very good display.  Anyone who does want to get a lap top for photo editing probably should look at the gaming machines and check specs for sRGB and AdobeRGB coverage or plan to buy a monitor to add on for more exacting graphics work.  I can tell from the laptop whether things are in focus and composed well and reasonably well exposed, but I'd basically use what I've got to cull rather than to prepare for submission.

 



 

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Desktop and a comfortable and ergonomic operator chair (with extra cushion).

IMO it would be very difficult to set up a laptop so that both keyboard and monitor were at ideal height.

 

Old netbook for travel, but only for downloading, then copying over to other HDs.

 

Edited by Cryptoprocta

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Two screen desktop makes life so much easier and not just for PP, but also  researching keywords etc

 

Use laptop when on my travels, and have PS installed, but rarely upload from it preferring to wait until I get home.

 

If I was supplying more than a tiny dribble of live news then I would probably make more use of it.    Horses for courses.

 

 

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9 hours ago, MizBrown said:

My main machine is a late 2015 27 inch 5K iMac.   I've recently bought a middle end Dell  laptop which doesn't have a very good display.  Anyone who does want to get a lap top for photo editing probably should look at the gaming machines and check specs for sRGB and AdobeRGB coverage or plan to buy a monitor to add on for more exacting graphics work.  I can tell from the laptop whether things are in focus and composed well and reasonably well exposed, but I'd basically use what I've got to cull rather than to prepare for submission.

 

IPS display = essential.

sRGB is fine.

AdobeRGB - a good score is rare in a laptop. Even in desktop displays btw. My Eizo's do 99%. My Dell's 96% of AdobeRGB. The recent MacBooks do just over 77% of AdobeRGB.

Even then: don't forget to calibrate your screen.

 

AdobeRGB laptops?

17inch:

Acer Predator Helios 500 PH517-51-93LS  - 4 kg ( = 141.1 oz / 8.82 pounds) - 88% - 2863 Euro

Schenker XMG Ultra 17 (Clevo P775TM1-G) - 4.368 kg ( = 154.08 oz / 9.63 pounds) 88% - 3842 Euro

 

15inch:

Lenovo ThinkPad P51 (Xeon, 4K) - 2.634 kg ( = 92.91 oz / 5.81 pounds)  -  87% - 3300 Euro

HP ZBook Studio G4 (Xeon) - 2.058 kg ( = 72.59 oz / 4.54 pounds) - 85.7% - 3500 Euro

Apple MacBook Pro 15 (Late 2016 w APPA030 panel) - 1.83 kg ( = 64.55 oz / 4.03 pounds) - 77.3% - 1325 Euro

 

13inch:

Apple MacBook Pro 13  (2018 i5 w APPA03E  panel) - 1.37 kg ( = 48.33 oz / 3.02 pounds) - 77.4% - 1999 Euro

 

 wim

 

edit: the percentages are the AdobeRGB values.

edit2: If you absolutely want a Windows laptop, but like the high AdobeRGB %% at low weight/low prices (all very relative of course) of the MacBook Pro's: have a look at the Boot Camp drivers. Review.

Edited by wiskerke

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2 hours ago, wiskerke said:

AdobeRGB - a good score is rare in a laptop. Even in desktop displays btw. My Eizo's do 99%. My Dell's 96% of AdobeRGB. The recent MacBooks do just over 77% of AdobeRGB.

Even then: don't forget to calibrate your screen.

 

So, if you want a better – preferably small – monitor to hook up to your laptop when you're sitting at a desk, what would be a good choice? The smallest Eizos appear to be 24 inches; the same with BenQ monitors.

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14 minutes ago, Thomas Kyhn said:

 

So, if you want a better – preferably small – monitor to hook up to your laptop when you're sitting at a desk, what would be a good choice? The smallest Eizos appear to be 24 inches; the same with BenQ monitors.

 

The Eizo 2420's are really good. I have not used Benq.

CS2420 is the budget model without the built in calibrator and without a hood. Here around 640 euro; 580 in June however and 700 in Nov 2017, so prices fluctuate.

The CG2420 is 1240 euro here, but briefly 1025 in September. Comes with the hood and built in sensor. It seems to have a slightly different panel which is slightly brighter.

The thing that sets the Eizo apart from other displays is the feature that's called Digital Uniformity Equalizer and a Brightness Stabilizer. The uniformity is exceptional and for me worth the extra money alone.

I have 2 of the budget variety: one CS2420 and it's predecessor the CS240 as the second panel. I do not see any difference though after calibration.

For that I use a i1 DisplayPro by XRite.

 

wim

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5 minutes ago, wiskerke said:

The Eizo 2420's are really good. I have not used Benq.

CS2420 is the budget model without the built in calibrator and without a hood. Here around 640 euro; 580 in June however and 700 in Nov 2017, so prices fluctuate.

The CG2420 is 1240 euro here, but briefly 1025 in September. Comes with the hood and built in sensor. It seems to have a slightly different panel which is slightly brighter.

The thing that sets the Eizo apart from other displays is the feature that's called Digital Uniformity Equalizer and a Brightness Stabilizer. The uniformity is exceptional and for me worth the extra money alone.

I have 2 of the budget variety: one CS2420 and it's predecessor the CS240 as the second panel. I do not see any difference though after calibration.

For that I use a i1 DisplayPro by XRite.

 

Thanks!

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3 hours ago, wiskerke said:

 

IPS display = essential.

sRGB is fine.

AdobeRGB - a good score is rare in a laptop. Even in desktop displays btw. My Eizo's do 99%. My Dell's 96% of AdobeRGB. The recent MacBooks do just over 77% of AdobeRGB.

Even then: don't forget to calibrate your screen.

 

AdobeRGB laptops?

17inch:

Acer Predator Helios 500 PH517-51-93LS  - 4 kg ( = 141.1 oz / 8.82 pounds) - 88% - 2863 Euro

Schenker XMG Ultra 17 (Clevo P775TM1-G) - 4.368 kg ( = 154.08 oz / 9.63 pounds) 88% - 3842 Euro

 

15inch:

Lenovo ThinkPad P51 (Xeon, 4K) - 2.634 kg ( = 92.91 oz / 5.81 pounds)  -  87% - 3300 Euro

HP ZBook Studio G4 (Xeon) - 2.058 kg ( = 72.59 oz / 4.54 pounds) - 85.7% - 3500 Euro

Apple MacBook Pro 15 (Late 2016 w APPA030 panel) - 1.83 kg ( = 64.55 oz / 4.03 pounds) - 77.3% - 1325 Euro

 

13inch:

Apple MacBook Pro 13  (2018 i5 w APPA03E  panel) - 1.37 kg ( = 48.33 oz / 3.02 pounds) - 77.4% - 1999 Euro

 

 wim

 

edit: the percentages are the AdobeRGB values.

edit2: If you absolutely want a Windows laptop, but like the high AdobeRGB %% at low weight/low prices (all very relative of course) of the MacBook Pro's: have a look at the Boot Camp drivers. Review.

Interesting set of facts and figures there Wim, thank you very much for taking the trouble to post that. I have to admit, I hadn't even thought of some of those points> certainly worth factoring into any decision.

 

Edited by Richard Coombs
Edit

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Both. Laptop while shooting in a studio, tethered, and for when I'm not in the office. In the office I use a Mac Pro with a 27 2k monitor and a 27 QHD Cintiq.

 

The most important one for me is the 27 2k monitor as this gives the right pixel density to check image sharpness. The laptop (retina) is too high a pixel density to be able to tell if an image is sharp and the Cintiq is more about drawing than reviewing.

Edited by Duncan_Andison

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On 11/16/2018 at 09:54, wiskerke said:

 

IPS display = essential.

sRGB is fine.

AdobeRGB - a good score is rare in a laptop. Even in desktop displays btw. My Eizo's do 99%. My Dell's 96% of AdobeRGB. The recent MacBooks do just over 77% of AdobeRGB.

Even then: don't forget to calibrate your screen.

 

AdobeRGB laptops?

17inch:

Acer Predator Helios 500 PH517-51-93LS  - 4 kg ( = 141.1 oz / 8.82 pounds) - 88% - 2863 Euro

Schenker XMG Ultra 17 (Clevo P775TM1-G) - 4.368 kg ( = 154.08 oz / 9.63 pounds) 88% - 3842 Euro

 

15inch:

Lenovo ThinkPad P51 (Xeon, 4K) - 2.634 kg ( = 92.91 oz / 5.81 pounds)  -  87% - 3300 Euro

HP ZBook Studio G4 (Xeon) - 2.058 kg ( = 72.59 oz / 4.54 pounds) - 85.7% - 3500 Euro

Apple MacBook Pro 15 (Late 2016 w APPA030 panel) - 1.83 kg ( = 64.55 oz / 4.03 pounds) - 77.3% - 1325 Euro

 

13inch:

Apple MacBook Pro 13  (2018 i5 w APPA03E  panel) - 1.37 kg ( = 48.33 oz / 3.02 pounds) - 77.4% - 1999 Euro

 

 wim

 

edit: the percentages are the AdobeRGB values.

edit2: If you absolutely want a Windows laptop, but like the high AdobeRGB %% at low weight/low prices (all very relative of course) of the MacBook Pro's: have a look at the Boot Camp drivers. Review.

 

Wim - I need to upgrade both my 27in iMac and my 13" MacBook Pro - I find the laptop much better for reviewing and keywording images - although for fine work and to check if I'm not sure of sharpness I use the 27in iMac since the Retina display makes everything look sharp. The laptop is easier on my back and neck - I love the 27" iMac but I can never get my field of view at the center because I'm really short (4'11") and my knees would hit the underside of the desk if I made the chair tall enough. If I buy another iMac it will be the smaller one, but you mention the Eizo monitor, a brand I've never heard of. It really makes more sense for me to get a powerful MacBook that I can use when I travel, when I want to get out of the house and work at a coffeehouse, and just to save my back, and then get a monitor to hook it up to when I'm doing more detailed work. Does the Eizo work with the Macs? 

 

Everyone - In 2013, I went from a 17" MacBook Pro to a 13" MacBook Pro with Retina display because the weight factor made a huge difference. I'm a petite grandmother with a bad back, so I really liked the change and while getting used to the smaller screen at first was tough, the ease of carting it along with me made it worthwhile, and I always had the 27"iMac on my desk. What do you think about just getting the best specs on a new 13" Macbook Pro Retina and then using say a 24" monitor for detail work, checking sharpness, fine art work, etc.? 

 

If your laptop and desktop were both old and fading, what would you get these days? 

 

Would a better option be a 24" iMac and an iPad Pro or does that mean you can only use PS Express and LR Mobile (or whatever they call the one that isn't LR Classic)? 

 

I welcome your thoughts. 

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I do most of my work on a well equipped DELL with a calibrated 24" monitor, but I also have a LENOVO T 410

also calibrated monitor (aRGB is 96%) that I use on location.  The LENOVO laptop is fine for NEWS and on

location previews, but I prefer to do my serious work on the desktop even though I can run my large monitor

on my laptop.  I have only used LENOVO laptops for the last 15 years.

 

Sorry but not a Mac person.

 

Chuck

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