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Can any of you clever birdy people out there identify this critter for me please.  If it helps, he/she resides at Cotswold Falconry Centre.  Thanks, Krys

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Looks like a peregrine to me.  Probably a juvenile.

Possibly Falco peregrinus pealei but don't quote me on that.

Edited by Reimar

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Looks a bit bulky to be a peregrine to me, European Buzzard might be nearer.

 

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If it is from a falconry centre it may very well be a cross or hybrid - I ran into this problem several years ago on microstock with a bird that was Lanner, Peregrine and something else (both parents were peregrine crosses I believe).

Your best bet is to phone or google the falconry centre and see if you can get details. 

 

Edited by Starsphinx
  • Upvote 1

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Thanks for trying guys.  This is actually larger than a Peregrine falcon and I know it isn't a buzzard.  I suspect it is some kind of hawk (but then again who knows).  I usually snap the ID of the critter when photographing it but obviously lost the plot on this occasion.........

 

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This is a non-expert contribution, but comparing the list of birds on their website with your picture, I'd be inclined to have a look at Swainson's Hawk as a possible candidate. 

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7 minutes ago, Joseph Clemson said:

This is a non-expert contribution, but comparing the list of birds on their website with your picture, I'd be inclined to have a look at Swainson's Hawk as a possible candidate. 

 

That does look like a better fit.  Juveniles can make ID harder.

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Just to be awkward the Red Backed Hawk looks very similar. Definitely not a parrot:)

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I'm sure the place will identify it for you.

Especially if you give them the ring number which appears so prominently!

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Quote

 

 

54 minutes ago, Joseph Clemson said:

This is a non-expert contribution, but comparing the list of birds on their website with your picture, I'd be inclined to have a look at Swainson's Hawk as a possible candidate. 

 

Thank you for the info Joseph, I think you may be right.  There were other Swainson's Hawks at the falconry which have a slightly different appearance from this guy, but that could be why I didn't snap the ID plaque again when I saw this critter.  Thanks also for pointing me to a useful bird website.

 

38 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

I'm sure the place will identify it for you.

Especially if you give them the ring number which appears so prominently!

That is also a great idea spacecadet.  Thanks.


Thanks everyone for your input - much appreciated.  Hope I can return the favour some day. ;)

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If it has  a large tooth shape ripple on it's beak it could be a female Merlin, Falco columbarius. Not an expert on this but I photographed a Merlin last week

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2 hours ago, Marmot said:

Thanks for trying guys.  This is actually larger than a Peregrine falcon and I know it isn't a buzzard.  I suspect it is some kind of hawk (but then again who knows).  I usually snap the ID of the critter when photographing it but obviously lost the plot on this occasion.........

 

I found out on my visit to Scotland this year that while a buzzard is a vulture where I come from, in Europe, a buzzard is a hawk.  Live and learn.

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3 hours ago, Reimar said:

I found out on my visit to Scotland this year that while a buzzard is a vulture where I come from, in Europe, a buzzard is a hawk.  Live and learn.

 

Which is why we must include Latin names.

Buteo: both buzzards and hawks.

The trouble probably started when Linneaus named our Buizerd (Buteo buteo) Falco buteo. In 1758.

 

wim

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On 10/31/2018 at 09:05, aphperspective said:

Looks a bit bulky to be a peregrine to me, European Buzzard might be nearer.

 

 

"A Photographic Guide to North American Raptors" has a photograph of a juvenile Swanson's Hawk that looks close, but I think calling the falconry center or emailing them with a small copy of the photo might give firmer ID.

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It does appear to be a juvenile. Usually with most birds that have only recently left the nest, the (is it) Ceres? The spot where the nostrils are, is yellowish along with the edges of the beak where it meets the face. Corner of the mouth, so to speak. 

Mother Nature must have arranged that coloring to help the parent birds see the open beak to feed while in a dark nest! It fades within a short time after fledging.

Often, with hawks, the color of the eyes change as the bird becomes adult. Many times red, orange or yellow. So this immature hawk will definitely undergo some coloration changes, possibly feather marking changes also.

Betty

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It's almost definitely a juvenile Buteo. As to which one, hard to say. But it's not Falco. The beak isn't toothed. BTW, did you know that DNA studies have shown hawks and falcons to be only distantly related? Falcons are more closely related to parrots.

 

Edit: I take that Buteo thing back. Have a look at this juvenile goshawk: https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/londonbirders/images/5/51/Juvenile_Goshawk.JPG/revision/latest/scale-to-width-down/1280?cb=20110825102224

Edited by TABan

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4 minutes ago, TABan said:

It's almost definitely a juvenile Buteo. As to which one, hard to say. But it's not Falco. The beak isn't toothed. BTW, did you know that DNA studies have shown hawks and falcons to be only distantly related? Falcons are more closely related to parrots.

 

Edit: I take that Buteo thing back. Have a look at this juvenile goshawk: https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/londonbirders/images/5/51/Juvenile_Goshawk.JPG/revision/latest/scale-to-width-down/1280?cb=20110825102224

Or maybe not. Eye color is wrong. It's tough with juveniles.

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18 hours ago, TABan said:

Or maybe not. Eye color is wrong. It's tough with juveniles.

You can’t consider eye color in this instance. The original image is a juvenile, and eye color almost always changes on the way to maturity.  The one in your link appears to be an adult.

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On 02/11/2018 at 13:15, Matt Ashmore said:

You've tried looking here?: https://www.cotswold-falconry.co.uk/our-birds/falcons-caracaras

 

You say you were at the Cotswold Falconry Centre so their website seems like the obvious place to start..  :ph34r:

Yes I looked there but they have far more birds than listed on their website.  Thanks anyway.

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On 03/11/2018 at 00:37, TABan said:

It's almost definitely a juvenile Buteo. As to which one, hard to say. But it's not Falco. The beak isn't toothed. BTW, did you know that DNA studies have shown hawks and falcons to be only distantly related? Falcons are more closely related to parrots.

 

Edit: I take that Buteo thing back. Have a look at this juvenile goshawk: https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/londonbirders/images/5/51/Juvenile_Goshawk.JPG/revision/latest/scale-to-width-down/1280?cb=20110825102224

Yes I agree it seems to be a Buteo.  Interestingly,  your link to a juvenile goshawk shows a bird very much like one I snapped at the Raptor centre.  The youngsters don't look anything like adult goshawks.   I thought it might be a female if not a juvenile.

X_014934Goshawk.jpg

 

 

Edited by Marmot
Got link not picture.

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