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Hi All,

I am a photographer for many years, have no problem to pass QC here.

I 've accumulated about 5000 images here. most of them have 50 keywords with good caption.

But nothing was soled. why ?

 

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On 27/10/2018 at 15:16, NoamGr said:

Hi All,

I am a photographer for many years, have no problem to pass QC here.

I 've accumulated about 5000 images here. most of them have 50 keywords with good caption.

But nothing was soled. why ?

 

From a quick look I’d suggest you have too many similars, so your 5,000 image count is not relevant, and your images are unlikely to suit the editorial market that Alamy mostly focuses on. You seem to have pages and pages of the same model in similar poses, not doing anything in particular.

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what it means "editorial market" ?

what type of images ?

or "do you mean that I have to change the license  to  Editorial only ?

many thanks

 

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10 minutes ago, NoamGr said:

what it means "editorial market" ?

what type of images ?

or "do you mean that I have to change the license  to  Editorial only ?

many thanks

 

What Sally means is that your pictures aren't suited to Alamy's market.

Look through this thread to see what pictures are being sold here - this is the market you should be aiming at.

Good luck!

Tony

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I suggest firstly you do some research on the forum. Look at the posts put each month for images found and images sold. Do any of your images seem like they may fit the criteria of what is selling? What about the keywords and captions of those images? Similar to your 'style'? In the images found threads you will see the same names coming up over and over, look at their portfolios. 

There is alot to learn from this forum

edit to say: these threads/subjects come up every month, look back over a few months not just one!

 

Edited by george

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15 minutes ago, Sally said:

From a quick look I’d suggest you have too many similars, so your 5,000 image count is not relevant, and your images are unlikely to suit the editorial market that Alamy mostly focuses on. You seem to have pages and pages of the same model in similar poses, not doing anything in particular.

 

Plus One on Sally's comments. You have far too many irrelevant keywords and far too many similar images. Every time a search returns your images and they turn out to be irrelevant to the buyers needs it harms your Alamy ranking and pushes your images further down the search rankings in future. You need to be more descriptive and concise with your captions: eg. PX0DA4 'Young blond woman in white hat and gingham dress sitting on a railway line'. No need to keep using 'amazing', it adds nothing to the information a buyer needs. If your keywording has been done by  automatic software you need to either cull  its output with a more critical eye, or ditch it altogether and do the keywording yourself. I'm guessing English isn't your first language, but captioning and keywording in good English are such an important part of selling at Alamy that you need to find a way to overcome any limitations you have in this regard.

 

If you have a model release for any people in the image and/or property releases where they are needed, then you can sell the image as 'commercial', that is it can be used for advertising publications. If you can't supply signed releases then you should mark RF images as 'editorial only' or make them RM licence type. Such unreleased images can only be licenced for editorial use - in publications such as newspapers and textbooks, illustrating newsworthy or academic text.

 

I'm guessing you might  be able to obtain a model release for many of your pictures, in which case they will be more marketable for commercial use when properly marked as released. However, make sure your model is aware of the implications of signing a model release as you will have minimal control over how the images are used once purchased. Make sure also no property releases are required.  All of these issues are discussed at length in the Alamy blog and in various threads on this forum.

 

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You seem to have fallen into the trap that every image needs 50 keywords. Every irrelevant word you use will hurt your rank, which in turn will hurt your sales. 

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34 minutes ago, Joseph Clemson said:

PX0DA4 'Young blond woman in white hat and gingham dress sitting on a railway line'.

Also, in many of the photos she is actually wearing a hat and not a hut.

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A good example of using your pregnant model would have been to have her shopping in a baby store, preparing the baby's room or showing the frustrations of being pregnant such as trying to tie her shoe laces.  And they shouldn't nook posed, but candid.

 

Jill

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Your landscapes (countryside) lack punch. I’m not sure how you are processing your images, but in Photoshop or Lightroom, if there is a true gray, white or black in the image, using the white balance dropper will make the colors truer. If not, you can use the wb slider and tweak. Using the contrast slider to 10, and other features like curves can add more punch. Just be careful you don’t overdo and make the images appear cartoonish.

That said, only submit landscapes if they illustrate something a buyer would be interested in. 

Irrigation of crops

crop failure

dried up lakes or rivers, cracked earth, illustrating drought conditions

a field with a crop growing or being harvested.

Closeup of a crop plant

A person or people planting or harvesting 

A beautiful scene of popular tourist spots

people behaving normally and not looking at the camera enjoying the tourist destination 

 beautiful scene (mountains, lakes, hiking trails among beauty that would entice people to want to visit the area

 

This list is an example of editorial images. A buyer using your picture to illustrate an article in a book, newspaper or magazine.  Or online publication.

For instance, I just sold an image of a truck full of harvested wheat in a wheat field. This perhaps was used to illustrate an article in a newspaper reporting the stage of their local wheat harvest.

Also a closeup picture of flowers with the common name and scientific name in the caption and keywords. This could be used by a nursery advertising online the plants they have for sale. Or by a gardening magazine. Or as a label for a product....who knows?

You need to think “conceptually”. Before you press the shutter, think “how could this image illustrate a thought, concept, action or whatever?

 

When it comes to people, like Jill said, have that person doing something and not looking at the camera. The pregnant lady dressed in exercise clothes taking a walk while carrying small hand weights. Decorating the nursery, shopping for baby clothes, eating something healthy, eating something unhealthy....reading the label on a bottle of vitamins, weighing herself while trying to see the numbers at her feet over her swollen stomach, the list goes on.

She shouldn’t be holding her swollen stomach. The big tummy speaks for itself without hands/arms bracketing it. It doesn’t need to be naked, either, unless she’s rubbing lotion or product on it to prevent stretch marks! Or if she’s showing stretch marks!

If she’s doing something fun, she can smile, just not at the camera. If she’s walking, she could smile, not smile, or be blowing hair off her forehead through her lips while looking like she’s concentrating hard. The object is for the person to look natural, not contrived poses like you’re taking portraits.

I also just sold a picture of a man sitting in his recliner gazing off, looking confused. It is a profile, unsmiling. This image was key worded using concepts like “dementia” which is a hot topic and a rampant medical condition.

You only need a couple of shots. Pick your best vertical and horizontal to upload. 

Hope this helps.

Betty

 

 

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many thanks everybody here.

I read carefully your advices, and I am going to implement them.

many thanks again ! :)

 

 

 

 

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49 minutes ago, NoamGr said:

many thanks everybody here.

I read carefully your advices, and I am going to implement them.

many thanks again ! :)

 

 

 

 

You are welcome! It’s refreshing for someone to ask for advice, and not only take it, but be grateful. Good luck to you, sir.

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The pregnancy series has potential but fell flat on the post-processing. In fact, most images look like they were uploaded straight from the camera.

 

On a side note, I admire someone who will upload 5k images for 16 years without earning anything. That's what I call optimism. 

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21 hours ago, JeffGreenberg said:

You seem to be from this place

 

If your 5K images had appearance, subject matter, & tagging

similar to those images, you'd be getting daily-weekly sales, IMO...

Do not copy those images, but be inspired by them...

+1

Some great images here

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On 10/29/2018 at 17:16, Betty LaRue said:

Your landscapes (countryside) lack punch. I’m not sure how you are processing your images, but in Photoshop or Lightroom, if there is a true gray, white or black in the image, using the white balance dropper will make the colors truer. If not, you can use the wb slider and tweak. Using the contrast slider to 10, and other features like curves can add more punch. Just be careful you don’t overdo and make the images appear cartoonish.

That said, only submit landscapes if they illustrate something a buyer would be interested in. 

Irrigation of crops

crop failure

dried up lakes or rivers, cracked earth, illustrating drought conditions

a field with a crop growing or being harvested.

Closeup of a crop plant

A person or people planting or harvesting 

A beautiful scene of popular tourist spots

people behaving normally and not looking at the camera enjoying the tourist destination 

 beautiful scene (mountains, lakes, hiking trails among beauty that would entice people to want to visit the area

 

This list is an example of editorial images. A buyer using your picture to illustrate an article in a book, newspaper or magazine.  Or online publication.

For instance, I just sold an image of a truck full of harvested wheat in a wheat field. This perhaps was used to illustrate an article in a newspaper reporting the stage of their local wheat harvest.

Also a closeup picture of flowers with the common name and scientific name in the caption and keywords. This could be used by a nursery advertising online the plants they have for sale. Or by a gardening magazine. Or as a label for a product....who knows?

You need to think “conceptually”. Before you press the shutter, think “how could this image illustrate a thought, concept, action or whatever?

 

When it comes to people, like Jill said, have that person doing something and not looking at the camera. The pregnant lady dressed in exercise clothes taking a walk while carrying small hand weights. Decorating the nursery, shopping for baby clothes, eating something healthy, eating something unhealthy....reading the label on a bottle of vitamins, weighing herself while trying to see the numbers at her feet over her swollen stomach, the list goes on.

She shouldn’t be holding her swollen stomach. The big tummy speaks for itself without hands/arms bracketing it. It doesn’t need to be naked, either, unless she’s rubbing lotion or product on it to prevent stretch marks! Or if she’s showing stretch marks!

If she’s doing something fun, she can smile, just not at the camera. If she’s walking, she could smile, not smile, or be blowing hair off her forehead through her lips while looking like she’s concentrating hard. The object is for the person to look natural, not contrived poses like you’re taking portraits.

I also just sold a picture of a man sitting in his recliner gazing off, looking confused. It is a profile, unsmiling. This image was key worded using concepts like “dementia” which is a hot topic and a rampant medical condition.

You only need a couple of shots. Pick your best vertical and horizontal to upload. 

Hope this helps.

Betty

 

 

If you only ever read this post, make sure you read it again and again!  I wish I'd had advice like this when I first started - it's brilliant!

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39 minutes ago, Colblimp said:

If you only ever read this post, make sure you read it again and again!  I wish I'd had advice like this when I first started - it's brilliant!

Thank you. :)

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Naom,

 

After looking at the first page of you images on Alamy your question answers itself.

There are many contributors who's images keep me looking through 10 to 20 pages.

Chuck

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In addition to what other Alamy contributors have said:

Your captions need to be more descriptive - not just "new building site", but mention in the caption where it actually is: mention town and country in the caption.

You overuse the word beautiful, especially when you describe buildings: a modern building is not necessarily "beautiful", instead go for "detail view of office block facade in XXX".

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9 hours ago, Colblimp said:

If you only ever read this post, make sure you read it again and again!  I wish I'd had advice like this when I first started - it's brilliant!

thanks Betty, I read it and I will read it again. 

you write me very clearly thanks for your effort.

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I have just taken a second look at one of your more recent additions and it seems to me that the forums message hasn't quite sunk in.

 

Your close up of a rhino for example is a saleable image yet your keywords still show ' farm, farmyard, animated, habit, national, yard, zoom. What kind of farms do you have in Israel:).

Seriously these keywords add nothing to that image and I personally would not have included them. On the other hand which species of rhino is it, this is not shown in the keywords.

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48 minutes ago, BobD said:

I have just taken a second look at one of your more recent additions and it seems to me that the forums message hasn't quite sunk in.

 

Your close up of a rhino for example is a saleable image yet your keywords still show ' farm, farmyard, animated, habit, national, yard, zoom. What kind of farms do you have in Israel:).

Seriously these keywords add nothing to that image and I personally would not have included them. On the other hand which species of rhino is it, this is not shown in the keywords.

as I already wrote, I review all my images keywords. its long process …. 

thanks 

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1 hour ago, NoamGr said:

as I already wrote, I review all my images keywords. its long process …. 

thanks 

 

A tip about keywording zoo images is that you can get information from the sign posted at the exhibit. Take a photo of the sign and use it to see the specific type of animal and latin name. Always include the latin name in keywords. Often people search using that scientific term. I also include the name of the zoo in my caption. People are sometimes looking for a specific zoo.

 

Paulette

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