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Here are two cleaning tips, one I learned a few years ago, and the other dates back to my time in Rome.

 

A Broadway theatre wardrobe mistress cleans everything this way: take a cup of clean ice cold water and a clean white napkin or hanky. (I put a mug of water in the freezer for 5 minutes.) Dip the cloth in the water and rub with short strokes at the stain. Keep doing it until the stain is gone. This works, people.

 

In a restaurant in Italy, if you spile an oily sauce on your clothing, ask the waiter for the talcum powder. Shake a liberal amount on the clothes and don't rub it in. When you have the garment dry cleaned there will be no stain. Do they do this anymore? I have no idea.

 

Edo

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5 hours ago, NYCat said:

Believe it or not I would love to be able to do my own washing. No washer/dryer in my apartment or in the basement of my building. One BIG disadvantage for me. There used to be a laundromat close by but it is now a fancy dress shop. We have become too upscale for laundromats, alas. So a problem arises when a garment needs special care. So, yes, it is great to have laundry picked up and delivered but also can be very, very convenient to have one's own washing machine. Lucky you.

 

Paulette

 

Laundromats have all but disappeared in condo-crazy Vancouver. All the new suites have washers and dryers, and older apartment buildings usually have laundry rooms with coin-operated machines. I actually used to enjoy going to the laundromat in the days when I had to. It was relaxing to sit there with a book or magazine listening to the soothing rumble of the machines in the background. Also, laundromats always seemed to attract colourful -- sometimes too colourful -- characters to chat with. I imagine these days laundromat users (such as they are) tend to be too busy staring at their tiny electronic screens to socialize much.

 

 

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Of the many reasons I decided to pick Spain as the place to try to restart my life, the low cost of things here is a major factor. It seems that low cost does not include attending a bullfight. 

 

I am not an aficionado, but I do go sometimes and I want to go here in Seville to take pictures. I just checked the price of tickets. Wow! To sit in sombra, the shade, it will cost me 150 euros. Back in the '70s, when I did a guide to the Costa del Sol, it seemed that seeing the fights cost me less than lunch. Again . . . wow.

 

Edo

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18 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

Of the many reasons I decided to pick Spain as the place to try to restart my life, the low cost of things here is a major factor. It seems that low cost does not include attending a bullfight. 

 

I am not an aficionado, but I do go sometimes and I want to go here in Seville to take pictures. I just checked the price of tickets. Wow! To sit in sombra, the shade, it will cost me 150 euros. Back in the '70s, when I did a guide to the Costa del Sol, it seemed that seeing the fights cost me less than lunch. Again . . . wow.

 

Edo

 

In lots of places bring your EU passport and say I'm over 65. They have reduced entrance tickets almost everywhere especially when there's EU subsidy involved.

When I was in Madrid in December I didn't qualify yet. ;-)

However in February I will.

I don't think tickets for the first fights in Maestranza are available yet. They start end of March I think. There's a fight in Cantillana in February. Prices: 39 and 47 Eur. Not cheap indeed.

The season proper starts mid May. However there will of course be fights during the May Feria. Probably even during the March Feria. That may be that first fight.

 

wim

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I wanted to go to Spain as a student because I loved flamenco and I used to go to Tijuana for the bullfights. I did my junior year in Madrid and never saw flamenco or bullfights because I couldn't afford them. I can't remember prices but to a student it seemed too much even those many years ago.

 

Paulette

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1 hour ago, Ed Rooney said:

Of the many reasons I decided to pick Spain as the place to try to restart my life, the low cost of things here is a major factor. It seems that low cost does not include attending a bullfight. 

 

I am not an aficionado, but I do go sometimes and I want to go here in Seville to take pictures. I just checked the price of tickets. Wow! To sit in sombra, the shade, it will cost me 150 euros. Back in the '70s, when I did a guide to the Costa del Sol, it seemed that seeing the fights cost me less than lunch. Again . . . wow.

 

Edo

Presumably you've got this

https://www.entradas-toros-sevilla.com/ticket-prices-sevilla.htm

so you can get it down a lot if you take a parasol. €37, or €22 for the young bulls.

But I agree,  it's not mass entertainment anymore. The same happened to soccer and cinema tickets.

I went with a friend in Valencia in 2003. Spectacular, of course, but I won't need to go again.

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Edo, as Wim says use your age! here in Portugal you would be getting big discounts on public transport, entry to museums, swimming pools, cinemas, events plus a lot more I would guess. I would think Spain must be the same. Also it may be worth you checking if there is one day per month where heritage sites and museums are free, there is here. 

Jenny 

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1 hour ago, Ed Rooney said:

Of the many reasons I decided to pick Spain as the place to try to restart my life, the low cost of things here is a major factor. It seems that low cost does not include attending a bullfight. 

 

I am not an aficionado, but I do go sometimes and I want to go here in Seville to take pictures. I just checked the price of tickets. Wow! To sit in sombra, the shade, it will cost me 150 euros. Back in the '70s, when I did a guide to the Costa del Sol, it seemed that seeing the fights cost me less than lunch. Again . . . wow.

 

Edo

 

Please don’t go. Do not encourage animal abuse. It is one of the most atrocious spectacle in Spain. it should be banned.

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5 minutes ago, george said:

Edo, as Wim says use your age! here in Portugal you would be getting big discounts on public transport, entry to museums, swimming pools, cinemas, events plus a lot more I would guess. I would think Spain must be the same. Also it may be worth you checking if there is one day per month where heritage sites and museums are free, there is here. 

Jenny 

 

In Madrid state owned museums are free every afternoon, I think after 4.

On free days museums may close whole sections though as we found out.

My local newspaper this morning had an article about bullfights and art. Mentioning a specific painting in Malaga, which I was researching when Edo posted about the expensive tickets.

Still not sure he had a official sales point. AFAIK the tickets only become available a certain time before a fight and it's not that long. However all sorts of agencies are selling their tickets (which they don't have yet) far in advance.

Personally I prefer the Portuguese fight, as long as they adhere to Portuguese rules and not Spanish ones. I have nothing against killing a bull and I love the meat, but the Portuguese fight is just more of a sport. And yes the bull lives in the end.

As my newspaper wrote: it's a ritualized sort of slaughter. A festive way of slaughter of cattle that had much better lives than those in the meat industry. I think we can agree on that.

As a photographer I always try to go where most people go on a Sunday. ;-)

 

OK now on to Mariano Fortuny and Sorolla (the painters)

 

wim

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59 minutes ago, lophius said:

 

Please don’t go. Do not encourage animal abuse. It is one of the most atrocious spectacle in Spain. it should be banned.

 

 

I covered the Vietnam War as a photo journalist, Roma. I was not there to encourage the war or war in general. Have you ever been to a slaughterhouse? I did a story on one. That would be something to protest against. 

 

Wim, in Spain, sometimes the bull is given a pass from slaughter. It's rare, but if the animal is seen as exceptionally brave, he can get a reprieve. I've never seen it happen, and yet I've seen no bulls who were not exceptionally brave. They are magnificent creatures, and they enter the ring with Dylan Thomas's thought, "Do not go gentle into that good night."

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33 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

I covered the Vietnam War as a photo journalist, Roma. I was not there to encourage the war or war in general. Have you ever been to a slaughterhouse? I did a story on one. That would be something to protest against. 

 

Wim, in Spain, sometimes the bull is given a pass from slaughter. It's rare, but if the animal is seen as exceptionally brave, he can get a reprieve. I've never seen it happen, and yet I've seen no bulls who were not exceptionally brave. They are magnificent creatures, and they enter the ring with Dylan Thomas's thought, "Do not go gentle into that good night."

 

Well, if you pay the entrance and you go as a spectator, you are collaborating in the show whether you like it or not.

I don’t need to enter any slaughterhouse to know what they do to animals. And indeed is something that I protest against.

 

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40 minutes ago, lophius said:

 

Well, if you pay the entrance and you go as a spectator, you are collaborating in the show whether you like it or not.

 

I don’t need to enter any slaughterhouse to know what they do to animals. And indeed is something that I protest against.

 

 

 

 

If you don't know what the word "collaborator" signifies in English I suggest you look it up.

Ed has given you a courteous and cogent reply. This is a stock photography forum. Lecture somewhere else.

Edited by spacecadet
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Mark, are you telling me that soccer tickets are expensive now?  As a kid in Brooklyn, I used to be able to go to a baseball game. Corporations buy up all those tickets now. 

 

Wow! I just looked up the football tickets! 

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Don't forget that it's always free to photograph  the protestors outside the bullring. I've been meaning to do that in Mexico for years but still haven't gotten around to it. There might even be better sales opportunities for these types of images.

 

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, spacecadet said:

If you don't know what the word "collaborator" signifies in English I suggest you look it up.

Ed has given you a courteous and cogent reply. This is a stock photography forum. Lecture somewhere else.

 

Sir, you are right, English is not my mother language.

But are you telling me that everything said in this post is related to photography, really?

 

From Cambridge dictionary “collaborator” has two meanings:

a person who works with an enemy who has taken control of their country

and a person who works together with others for a special purpose

 

Maybe I didn’t use the correct word but I think is not too difficult to understand the meaning of what I was I try to say.

Don’t worry this will be my last post here.

Cheers.

 

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On 1/30/2019 at 13:43, spacecadet said:

 

I went with a friend in Valencia in 2003. Spectacular, of course, but I won't need to go again.

 

 

Me too. If I were to go again, it would be to capture images, and that might be pointless. I've been to less than 10 bullfights. Several were just awful. The last one I went to was in Malaga in the 1970s when I saw the great matador, Luis Miguel Dominguin fight three bulls. It was an entirely different experience, and as Mark says, I have no need to go again. I like Hemingway's writing, but I don't share his interests. 

 

Bullfighting is not a part of my American or Irish culture. It's Spanish. I went to a cockfight in Indonesia once too. It was very unpleasant. In the States, we have our own traditions, like buying a AR 15 and killing strangers. I'm not going to voice an opinion or have a debate on any of these things in the Alamy forum. I'm sorry I mentioned it, Roma.

 

Edo

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51 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

Me too. If I were to go again, it would be to capture images, and that might be pointless. I've been to less than 10 bullfights. Several were just awful. The last one I went to was in Malaga in the 1970s when I saw the great matador, Luis Miguel Domonguin fight three bulls. It was an entirely different experience, and as Mark says, I have no need to go again. I like Hemingway's writing, but I don't share his interests. 

 

Bullfighting is not a part of my American or Irish culture. It's Spanish. I went to a cockfight in Indonesia once too. It was very unpleasant. In the States, we have our own traditions, like buying a AR 15 and killing strangers. I'm not going to voice an opinion or have a debate on any of these things in the Alamy forum. I'm sorry I mentioned it, Roma.

 

Edo

Wise words as always, Ed.

Think how much jamón and Estrella you could buy for that sombra ticket.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Today, February 17th is the first anniversary of the fire on Mulberry Street in NYC that made me homeless. I don't know if the building is open yet or if Angelo's has reopened. If any of you happen to walk by 146 Mulberry, please let me know.

 

I would like to take a minute and again thank the forum and Alamy and Ian and the others who stepped up to help me in those scary first months. Thank you so much.

 

For the moment I've landed on my feet, if on a rather slippery surface here in Seville. Poco a poco. 

 

Gracias, amigos

 

Edo

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Edo, check out the Facebook page for Angelo's. Looks like they thought they were opening and then had to postpone. So difficult. I know my life here in NYC depends on my rent stabilized apartment. A threat is arising to the peace and quiet I enjoy now. Someone is applying for a liquor license so they can make the old Barnes and Noble building on the corner of Sixth Ave. into a nightclub with dancing and a rooftop venue. Yikes! My building is right next door. I am trying to believe they would never be allowed to use the roof because there would be no way to control the noise and it would travel throughout the neighborhood. Fortunately, we have a good block association and we will be able to organize to fight the plans. New York can be very wonderful but it is also complicated. I'm glad you are finding your way in Spain.

 

Paulette

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