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Johnhoward28

Best used Full Frame camera for $600 or less?

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So my wife has finally caught the photo bug.  She takes pictures of everything with her phone and thinks she is a photographer.  In a moment of craziness I asked her if she would like a real camera and her eyes lit up, and I knew I made a commitment I could not back out of.  It's been a really tough year financially, but we have an anniversary coming up, so I got to spend some money anyways, and I already know what she wants. 😉  I want to get her a full frame but I don't want to spend a lot.  I have looked around and it seems the best camera I can find around $600 used, are the Sony A7 and the Nikon D600.  I plan to get her only one lens to start with, a 50mm 1.8 prime which I can find used for under $100.  So that will put the whole kit for around $700, and that will leave enough for me to send her to a introductory photography class to get her started off on the right foot.

 

So anyway, I am just wanting to hear from you guys hear and see which one you think I should get, or if you think there is something better for equal or less money.   

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Why a full frame? You can get an entry level Nikon DX format (D3400 or 3500) with kit lens for well within your budget. These are excellent cameras and excellent value, designed for beginners but fully controllable manually. I bought one for my wife recently and for my son a few years ago do talking from experience. 

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One of the finest (and most successful) commercial photographers I know has shot almost exclusively on an iPhone for the last two years.

 

Alex

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Agree with MDM, you will get so much more from your budget with an entry level camera. The quality of the Nikon 24MP base cameras is astounding. My father in law has a D3200 and its fantastic. 

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+1 on the NIkon, consider Sony A6000 also, if you can get to a camera store your wife could judge the difference in weight between the various configurations.  Full frames and their lenses can get pretty heavy to carry around.

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I would have to agree with others DX Nikon D3400 or new D3500.  They come with a 18-55 lens and run about $500.00.

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When I saw the header for this thread, the first thing I thought was “Why Full-frame?”

I began with DX, the Nikon D70, and have many images on Alamy from it. I tried full-frame for a few years, then happily went to crop mirrorless.

Betty

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I would suggest buying her the same manufacturer that your camera is so you could share lenses and accessories.

 

Have you asked her what she would like in terms of size and weight of a camera. You make full frame sounds so arbitrary that nothing else compares, there are successful photographers here on Alamy shooting one inch sensor Sony bridge cameras or the Sony RX100 series, then as others have said crop sensor or mirrorless can be excellent choices and lighter to carry around.

 

Sounds like you are going to get huge brownie points this anniversary congratulations.

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The reason I want to go full frame is that I had an entry level Pentax DSLR years ago, and none of the pictures I took with it qualify here on Alamy.  I don't want her to take a really nice picture and want me to upload it to my account and have it rejected, because of the camera she is shooting with.  

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You are on the wrong path with full-frame, as others have pointed out. 

 

Alex? I (we) would love to hear more about this successful iPhone shooter. I recently bought an iPhone 7. 

 

Edo

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56 minutes ago, Johnhoward28 said:

The reason I want to go full frame is that I had an entry level Pentax DSLR years ago, and none of the pictures I took with it qualify here on Alamy.  I don't want her to take a really nice picture and want me to upload it to my account and have it rejected, because of the camera she is shooting with.  

 

You absolutely don't need full frame for Alamy. If money is short, get a camera with an APSC sized sensor and a good lens.

 

Mark

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I can certainly recommend the Sony a6000. I picked up a new one with a 16-50mm lens for under $600 CAN earlier this year. It's probably the best camera I've ever owned. Easy to use and ideal for Alamy. You can also use legacy manual focus lenses on the a6000 with a cheap adapter if you prefer.

Edited by John Mitchell

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I agree that full frame is definitely not necessary. So far I have stuck with Nikon because I shoot wildlife but am seriously thinking of moving to mirrorless because my hands are not as strong and large as a man's hands. I think I take better photos when using a camera that is easy for me physically.

 

Paulette

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3 minutes ago, NYCat said:

I agree that full frame is definitely not necessary. So far I have stuck with Nikon because I shoot wildlife but am seriously thinking of moving to mirrorless because my hands are not as strong and large as a man's hands. I think I take better photos when using a camera that is easy for me physically.

 

Paulette

Paulette why not check out the Z6 and Z7, slightly lighter than the other Nikons and if you use Nikon lenses they will work fine.

 

Carol

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I may well be wrong, but don't think it's even possible with that budget here in the UK, as most full frame body-only cameras would exceed that amount. A second hand Canon 6D Mk 1, (great camera, I've used one day in, day out for the last two years) will cost around £600 here.
APS C cameras are the way to go for a decent DSLR at reasonable money.

Edited by TeeCee

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46 minutes ago, CAROL SAUNDERS said:

Paulette why not check out the Z6 and Z7, slightly lighter than the other Nikons and if you use Nikon lenses they will work fine.

 

Carol

 

I may do that but slightly lighter doesn't impress me. I took a look at a Sony a6000 the other day and there is a huge difference. I'm thinking of using it for walking around the city or even going to the zoo. If I continue to go to wild places I will be using my D500 and heavy lenses.

In those places I would be using a tripod or be in a vehicle where I can rest the camera on the windowsill. My photos of the Maasai tribe in the Masai Mara were taken with the smaller and lighter D80 with a relatively small zoom. They sell and were fun to take without the struggle of holding heavier cameras and lenses.

 

Paulette

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3 hours ago, Johnhoward28 said:

entry level Pentax DSLR years ago

How many years ago? The quality of sensors has increased beyond belief in the last years. If you get a recent crop sensor camera (I mentioned Nikon just because that is what I use, but Canon,Pentax, etc will be just as good) you will not be disappointed (quite the opposite in fact) and it will not fail QC. 

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What do you think about the Sony Alpha A7 II?   It has IBS and better video specs.

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If she wants a FF or (FX NIKON) the D700's are now pretty cheap,  I still use mine and just

shot a large event for Live News mostly with my D700 at 3200 ISO , no flash allowed .  I was

surprised at the quality.  The other advantage to NIKON or F mount bodies is that there is 

so much used glass available.

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8 hours ago, Johnhoward28 said:

The reason I want to go full frame is that I had an entry level Pentax DSLR years ago, and none of the pictures I took with it qualify here on Alamy.  I don't want her to take a really nice picture and want me to upload it to my account and have it rejected, because of the camera she is shooting with.  

I’ve shot with these DX cameras and have images from all on Alamy.

Nikon D70, D200, D300, D7000. 

Then got a full frame, didn’t like it. Bought a 

Fujifilm X-T1, then an X-T2.

Along the way, I’ve shot the original Sony RX100 and the RX100-2. Have pictures from the RXs on Alamy, also.

Right now, I have the two Fuji and the two Sony RX cameras. Love them all.

Betty

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14 hours ago, Chuck Nacke said:

If she wants a FF or (FX NIKON) the D700's are now pretty cheap,  I still use mine and just

shot a large event for Live News mostly with my D700 at 3200 ISO , no flash allowed .  I was

surprised at the quality.  The other advantage to NIKON or F mount bodies is that there is 

so much used glass available.

 

Everything you say about Nikon is right, Chuck. Except you don't mention the weight and the bulk. The D700 was the main reason I finally switched from Nikons to mirrorless Sonys. If I were still shooting assignments, like you are, I would still be using those serious-looking DSLRs. The D700 for a woman? She must spend a lot of time at the gym. 

 

Edo, who owned Nikons since the first F SLR.

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I shoot almost entirely using a crop sensor Sony (currently a6500) for Alamy, despite the fact that I own a FF Canon 5DII. The FF camera and lenses are far too heavy to cart around, while the quality of the images produced by the Sony (using decent - not Sony kit  - lenses) is excellent. The extended depth of field you get with a crop camera is of great benefit when shooting stock, your get more in focus without having to try hard.

 

I do like the look of FF photos however, and retain the camera to shoot pics of the family, grandkids etc. 

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Interesting topic, I'm just wondering if the lady knows the difference between FX and DX and please do not take that the wrong way.  I'm a Nikon user and yes they are bulky and I have small hands but because of the extra weight I find them easier to balance and yes I do go to they Gymn :D   As MDM said there are plenty of reasonable DX Nikons around and good glass.  For me I prefer FX and for years lugged around a 200-400mm F4 now that was heavy:blink: So  FX/DX horses for courses personal choice I think.  Good luck with whatever you get for your wife.  A happy wife is a happy life so they say;) It also might be an idea to take her into a shop if there's one close to you, so she can play with a couple and see what she feels comfortable with.  I always do this when buying new kit.  Even with the little Sony RX.

 

Carol

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17 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

You are on the wrong path with full-frame, as others have pointed out. 

 

Alex? I (we) would love to hear more about this successful iPhone shooter. I recently bought an iPhone 7. 

 

Edo

Have a look at Tim Clinch's work - http://www.timclinchphotography.com/

Not every job is shot on an iPhone, of course, but much of his food photography is, and a lot of portraits too. He's among the top food photographers on the planet.

 

Alex

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23 hours ago, MDM said:

Why a full frame? You can get an entry level Nikon DX format (D3400 or 3500) with kit lens for well within your budget. These are excellent cameras and excellent value, designed for beginners but fully controllable manually. I bought one for my wife recently and for my son a few years ago do talking from experience. 

2

 

18 hours ago, Johnhoward28 said:

The reason I want to go full frame is that I had an entry level Pentax DSLR years ago, and none of the pictures I took with it qualify here on Alamy.  I don't want her to take a really nice picture and want me to upload it to my account and have it rejected, because of the camera she is shooting with.  

 

23 hours ago, MDM said:

 

 

Firstly more evidence for the entry-level Nikons - I started out over 5 years ago with a Nikon D3200 - it is still my backup camera, still sees very regular use at football matches where I will have it set up with an 18-105mm lens in case of penalties while I shoot with a 70 to 300mm on my main camera - which is still a DX being the D7200.  Images from the well used D3200 are absolutely still accepted on Alamy - there were a bunch in my last upload.

Secondly regards uploading to your account - I may be wrong here and would appreciate input from other more experienced contributors but I believe uploading your wife's photos to your account would be in breach of Alamy terms.  The terms are you are declaring that you are the copyright holder on all images you upload - and unless your wife is signing copyright over to you that will not be the case.   Now I would imagine that plenty of people add the odd photo taken by some other family member, possibly having borrowed the camera, but if you are considering adding good shots your wife has taken with her own camera regularly I would recommend getting her her own Alamy account. 

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