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Sally R

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Posts posted by Sally R

  1. 59 minutes ago, gvallee said:

    I love your boobook story. Why wouldn't they dream too? 

    This is our second Big Lap. During our trips, we have met lots of people who have been on the road for years. Our current neighbors have been travelling for 8 years. The next ones are on the road indefinitely while home schooling their twins. Once we met a family with 4 young kids on the road for a year. It's very common in Australia. The great outdoors are so awesome for adults and kids alike. Wildlife is not always easy to spot, we do have to slow down and take time to look for it. I just love Australia. I couldn't live anywhere else but Immigration might have other ideas... We'll see.

     

    9 minutes ago, Sally R said:

    That sounds wonderful Gen. Perhaps you could do a book one day of your travels around Australia? Though uploading to Alamy is probably the best and easiest way to get your images out to the world right now. My parents have a book by a photographer called Bill Bachman that's called Local Colour: Travels in the Other Australia. It's from the 1990s so all film and the images are depicting people, life and landscapes away from the cities and in many of the places that people don't often see. I'm sure you also have many images capturing the localities and people you've visited that would make a great book. I hope you get to stay here!

     

    Hi Gen,

    Having just mentioned Bill Bachman to you with regard to his photos taken travelling around Australia, I just found that he has images on Alamy, in case they are of interest...

    https://www.alamy.com/search/imageresults.aspx?pseudoid={36B520F6-2A87-49B0-AFCD-220A419ED6A9}&name=Bill%2bBachman&st=11&mode=0&comp=1

     

  2. 3 minutes ago, george said:

    Only a little thing, but they are often the big things....

    I have been feeling a little down the last couple of days, living alone and not having very good weather always make things seem worse. I was supposed to fly back to UK a couple of days ago but obviously cancelled so have missed staying with my daughter (who just turned 30, missed that), going to see my mum on her 84th birthday (today), she lives alone too, and seeing my son and other family members. But a friend rang my door bell a couple of hours ago and over the gate she handed me a bag. Inside was a book for me to read but most importantly a beautiful piece of beetroot cake with cream cheese icing from my favourite cake shop. I tried to take some pics but could not be bothered to get the right light and plate etc as just wanted to get stuck into it. mmmmmm, delish. happy now 

     

    That's a lovely story George. We are all struggling with different things in the current situation, and then someone comes along with an act of kindness and it makes it all better. It is those small things that make the world go round! And I don't blame you for eating the beetroot cake before getting the right light to photograph it. I would have done the same. Cake is a great answer to feeling a bit down 👍

    • Upvote 1
  3. That sounds wonderful Gen. Perhaps you could do a book one day of your travels around Australia? Though uploading to Alamy is probably the best and easiest way to get your images out to the world right now. My parents have a book by a photographer called Bill Bachman that's called Local Colour: Travels in the Other Australia. It's from the 1990s so all film and the images are depicting people, life and landscapes away from the cities and in many of the places that people don't often see. I'm sure you also have many images capturing the localities and people you've visited that would make a great book. I hope you get to stay here!

  4. 9 hours ago, gvallee said:

    We have ringneck parakeets landing on our shoulders and arms to get fed while sitting under the awning. And a boobook calling at night in the tree overhead. It's a zoo!!

     

    We have a boobook owl calling all the way down here in Perth too Gen. He or she (not sure which) calls every night. It is the most comforting sound. One evening at dusk he or she was on the washing line and we saw each other through the window. We had fun imitating each others head movements my moving our heads in circles.

     

    Back in January when it was extremely hot I was working at the computer when I heard one calling about midday, which is obviously the opposite time than they are usually awake and calling. I could see her on a branch. She kept calling and then stopped. I wondered if she was dreaming and was calling in her sleep (the way dogs quite often yelp and bark in their sleep), and then she suddenly woke up and thought, oh it's not night time after all.

     

    It sounds wonderful where you are, discovering all the little creatures. I would love to do what you are doing one day, travelling across Australia and taking photos!

  5. Many thanks for all of your answers. Yes it sounds that I would be in breach of copyright, which I definitely don't want to do. I had been thinking that if they were editorial, then someone writing a blog article about guitar players of the 90s, for example, may want to use such a picture, and I thought this might not be a copyright issue. But I do not know enough and want to do the right thing, so I think it is best I don't upload the images. I did notice many magazine covers on Alamy which was making me unclear about what is ok, but as you mention Space Cadet it may not be something Alamy wants to happen.

     

    And thanks Geophotos, yes there may be a possibility of it being ok as all the magazines were between 1990 and 1994. But as Space Cadet says there is the issue of the copyright of the photos themselves. Even though there is plenty of writing on the covers partially obscuring the images, someone could still copy part of an image. I agree with you, the best thing is to ask Alamy directly.

     

  6. I was a keen guitarist when I was younger and I have a bunch of guitar magazines from the early 1990s. I have photographed some of these and wondered if they can be uploaded to Alamy and under what conditions? I was planning to make them editorial only which I think would be required. But in addition, I'm wondering whether I need to mark them as non-exclusive as per the recent Alamy guidelines?

     

    I've photographed the magazines outside on a wooden table. I've paired them in terms of covers that seem to go together, as I thought this might be more interesting that photographing them individually. The covers feature images of people such as Jeff Beck, Buddy Guy, Mark Knopfler, Joe Satriani etc.

     

    I can see many examples of magazine covers, album covers, book covers etc on Alamy, but I'm a little unclear about the conditions under which such photos can be uploaded. I am happy to tick the non-exclusive box if this is what is required as per Alamy's recent message on this, but I'm not quite sure if what they were referring to includes magazine covers. In the case of album covers, they often do depict artwork, so I'm guessing they may need to be non-inclusive if photographed in isolation without context.

     

    I also photographed some packets of vegetable seeds with the brand on the front. I've had brands of things appear incidentally in other photos I've taken, but in this case they are more isolated, so again, a bit unsure about these. I can ask Alamy directly, but given they are busy and likely to have slower response times at present, I thought I would just run this past the forum first.

     

    I am thinking at the moment to make them editorial only and non-exclusive even though only uploading them to Alamy (and all my images are RM). Just a bit confused about magazine covers, branded items etc, and interested to know your thoughts.

  7. Hi Marb,

     

    I've only had one sale so far which was in January, but I only got around to investigating where it might have sold to yesterday. I used Google reverse image search. If not familiar with this there are instructions here: https://support.google.com/websearch/answer/1325808?co=GENIE.Platform%3DDesktop&hl=en I just dragged and dropped my image from the Alamy website.

     

    I was really pleased to find it is being used by a newish local business for their website. They seem like a nice company. I realise though that it may not always be possible to find all future sales. Good luck!

    • Like 1
  8. We do have a blue flower here in Western Australia called Blue Lechenaultia (Lechenaultia biloba). Truly blue flowers are certainly less common than purplish blue ones, so they definitely stand out. I haven't uploaded any pictures of this species to Alamy myself, but here is someone else's I found on Alamy:

     

    stunning-vivid-blue-flower-with-white-throat-of-lechenaultia-biloba-GN763X.jpg

  9. On 16/04/2020 at 00:18, Betty LaRue said:

    I’ve been playing YouTube African Gray videos for my African Gray, and am amused seeing her watch and enjoy them.

    Betty

     

    This created such a nice picture for me, imagining your African Gray being entertained by watching other African Grays on YouTube. They are so playful, smart and full of character.

     

    A good thing today was that firstly it rained (we need the rain), but also there was a pair of galahs (pink and grey cockatoos) on the powerlines. They were preening themselves joyfully in the rain, regularly swinging round and upside down. It seemed like they were playing, but also enjoying a shower in the rain while they preen. I tried taking a couple of photos, but the sky was too bright behind them so didn't get a good shot. I did find a video on YouTube just now though that shows them doing the exact same behaviour in the rain:

     

     

  10. 1 hour ago, Betty LaRue said:
    On 04/04/2020 at 12:47, Sally R said:

     

    I love the idea of budgies rolling around in the snow. It's something they'd never get to do in their natural habitat here. Yes it must be quite a responsibility keeping the chicks alive and well.

     

    In 2018 I visited Stewart Island in southern New Zealand. A giant, flightless parrot called a kakapo used to live there. They are extremely endangered and so they moved them to Codfish Island where there are no introduced predators. However, people claim to have heard their call on remote parts of Stewart Island. I hoped I might encounter one, knowing that it was highly unlikely. I thought you might like this video about the most famous kakapo named SIrocco with one of his carers. He thinks he's a human as he was raised by humans as a chick. He is now considered the official spokesbird for his species. They are so loveable and cute:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQn90slumUY

    Ohhh, Sally! Thank you for this! It made me cry. What a darling 🦜 parrot, wish I could hold it. It has such tender eyes. 🥰

     

    Glad you enjoyed it Betty! Yes they are lovely. As Sirocco is so used to people and thinks of himself as a human, he has been taken around New Zealand to teach people about the endangered Kakapo. There seems to be a nice arrangement where he is with humans some of the time but also off in the wild some of the time. I really hoped he might have been doing one of his tours when I was there and I might get the chance to meet him. He is a bit of a rock star in New Zealand!

     

    And yes they have the most beautiful eyes and face. If ever feeling a bit down I think one answer must be to look into the eyes of a Kakapo parrot! We don't have any parrots that big here in Australia, but this is one of the local species from here is Western Australia. They are called the Australian Ring-necked Parrot and probably most commonly here the Twenty-Eight Parrot, as one of their calls sounds like they are saying twenty eight:

     

    australian-ringneck-parrot-barnardius-zonarius-subspecies-semitorquatus-also-known-as-the-twenty-eight-parrot-because-of-their-call-2A4W6DR.jpg

  11. Here are my three:

     

    1. Seven young people watching the sunset from a high granite rock:

     

    seven-young-people-in-silhouette-watching-the-sunset-from-a-high-rock-2AP4WAG.jpg

     
     
    2. Concerned citizens gathered for a community vigil in Perth in January in response to the bushfire crisis in Australia:
     
    concerned-citizens-attending-a-community-vigil-in-perth-western-australia-in-response-to-the-australian-bushfire-crisis-2ANJN1H.jpg
     
     
    3. People gathered to watch Canadian circus artists Quatuor Stomp at the 2018 Fremantle International Street Arts Festival in Western Australia:
     
    canadian-circus-artists-quatuor-stomp-at-the-2018-fremantle-international-street-arts-festival-western-australia-2ATM926.jpg
  12. Hi Patrik,

     

    I think you have some really lovely images. I love the one with the two hammocks, and the landscapes, and there's some nice street and shopfront images too. I get scared looking at the one of the two women jumping in the air on the ledge that is 700m high! My brother just came back from Spain and Portugal, so nice to see some images from places he told me about.

     

    I am also fairly new to Alamy and I have just one sale. I think it does take a while on Alamy compared with some other agencies, especially if those agencies are selling the images for much less as microstock. From what others here have said, it apparently can take quite a while to get regular sales with Alamy, but it seems that once you do, it gets better. I think if you can significantly increase the numbers in your portfolio and keep uploading a variety of images, you will hopefully see more sales in the not too distant future.

     

    To me your images seem appropriate for potential customers on Alamy, but there will be much more experienced people here who will have a better idea of that than me.

     

    All the best and you stay healthy too!

     

  13. On 02/04/2020 at 18:35, Allan Bell said:

    Rewarding but a lot of work. Every chick had to be checked each day for food stuck to their little beaks as it would harden and their beaks would become deformed.

    Adults are messy feeders of their young.

    Can't remember exactly how many nest boxes we had going at any one time but we were only a small concern with around 20 and usually an average of three young per nest. Breeding was year round too.

    Added to that there was the regular daily cleaning of the nest boxes and cages as well as the aviary and outdoor flights.

    Then topping up feeding containers and water bottles.

     

    But the birds are great fun and we had a good time watching their antics. In the winter when snow was on the ground we would open the doors to the outside flights and the birds would roll in the snow on the bottom of the flights.

     

    Allan

     

    I love the idea of budgies rolling around in the snow. It's something they'd never get to do in their natural habitat here. Yes it must be quite a responsibility keeping the chicks alive and well.

     

    In 2018 I visited Stewart Island in southern New Zealand. A giant, flightless parrot called a kakapo used to live there. They are extremely endangered and so they moved them to Codfish Island where there are no introduced predators. However, people claim to have heard their call on remote parts of Stewart Island. I hoped I might encounter one, knowing that it was highly unlikely. I thought you might like this video about the most famous kakapo named SIrocco with one of his carers. He thinks he's a human as he was raised by humans as a chick. He is now considered the official spokesbird for his species. They are so loveable and cute:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQn90slumUY

    • Upvote 1
  14. On 02/04/2020 at 21:52, dustydingo said:

    Some lovely images around showing animals slowly (in some cases rapidly) adapting to the lack of people on the streets--the wild goats in the little unpronounceable Welsh village are a delight.

    Never one to ignore a trend, here's my take on this phenomenom, taken in downtown New York . . .

     

    trexnyc.jpg

     

    She'd actually come into town to see the movie you can see advertised on the building in the background . . .

     

    Interesting to see a T-Rex hitting the town. Hope she enjoyed the movie. Yesterday I discovered a baby stegosaurus had taken up residence in the back garden. I was quite excited, as they were my favourite dinosaur when I was a kid. A bit worried about what will happen when Mama or Papa stegosaurus turn up (they weigh about 3 tonnes!). At least they are herbivores! This is the little guy in the hibiscus tree:

     

    Stegosaurus0000.jpg?dl=1

    • Like 1
    • Haha 1
  15. 11 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

    It is called a "Gaper".

     

    At least when I was a lot younger and a breeder of budgerigars the young with the wide mouth were called gapers.

     

    Allan

     

    Thanks Allan. I hadn't heard of gapers before. When really small in the nest, baby birds do seem to be mostly a mouth attached to a body. Must be nature's way of ensuring they get fed! That would have been lovely raising baby budgerigars. 

  16. 4 hours ago, gvallee said:

    What did I say? No further new species to be discovered? That's what Jurgen Otto said months ago. And today, this. 5 out of 7 new species are your way in WA.

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-04-02/seven-new-species-of-peacock-spider-discovered/12110306

     

    Wow, there's more! Nature comes up with the most artistic designs. Thanks for the link. I hope you are finding some nice little creatures to see and photograph in central Australia.

  17. 1 hour ago, dustydingo said:

    Well, it's not just Australia that has cranky birds . . . here's "proof" that a giant cockatoo, that just happens to live in a zoo in Bali, harassed a couple of women from Australia who were walking through a well-known Florida USA holiday resort . . . oh, and I have a lovely arched bridge over in Sydney I can sell you for a song . . . 

    attack.jpg

    DD

     

    😂 Ah-ha! That is the rare species Cockatoo megahumungousii. Not a bird to be trifled with!

  18. On 30/03/2020 at 21:53, dustydingo said:

    mine.jpg

     

    Inspired by the beautiful photos of cute robins and the like, I was prompted to respond with an example of the cute little birds we have around here . . .

     

     

    Ha ha! I think we must have some of the grumpiest seagulls on the planet. On one visit I made to Penguin Island that was meant to be "relaxing", it turned out to be seagull breeding season. They were hovering about a metre above you wherever you went on the island while screeching at full volume relentlessly. I think some international tourists were particularly terrified. Bridled terns nest at a different time on the island in much the same nesting spots, as I saw those last year, and they were not aggressive at all by comparison.

  19. 9 minutes ago, gvallee said:

    Are you familiar with the peacock spiders mating dance? It's extraordinary. There are quite a few videos. Here's one by Jurgen Otto. 

     

    Thanks, that's a brilliant video 😀 😂 Love the music/dance combo. Yes I had seen it before on a nature documentary. It's quite amazing the complex world of small creatures that most of the time we don't see. They are pretty groovy dancers too!

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