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Sally R

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Everything posted by Sally R

  1. I was a keen guitarist when I was younger and I have a bunch of guitar magazines from the early 1990s. I have photographed some of these and wondered if they can be uploaded to Alamy and under what conditions? I was planning to make them editorial only which I think would be required. But in addition, I'm wondering whether I need to mark them as non-exclusive as per the recent Alamy guidelines? I've photographed the magazines outside on a wooden table. I've paired them in terms of covers that seem to go together, as I thought this might be more interesting that photographing them i
  2. Hi Marb, I've only had one sale so far which was in January, but I only got around to investigating where it might have sold to yesterday. I used Google reverse image search. If not familiar with this there are instructions here: https://support.google.com/websearch/answer/1325808?co=GENIE.Platform%3DDesktop&hl=en I just dragged and dropped my image from the Alamy website. I was really pleased to find it is being used by a newish local business for their website. They seem like a nice company. I realise though that it may not always be possible to find all future sa
  3. We do have a blue flower here in Western Australia called Blue Lechenaultia (Lechenaultia biloba). Truly blue flowers are certainly less common than purplish blue ones, so they definitely stand out. I haven't uploaded any pictures of this species to Alamy myself, but here is someone else's I found on Alamy:
  4. My goal this year had been to focus on photographing events and life in my city. As that has obviously changed now, I've resorted to going back over my images from the last few years including many I've taken of wildflowers from here in Western Australia:
  5. This created such a nice picture for me, imagining your African Gray being entertained by watching other African Grays on YouTube. They are so playful, smart and full of character. A good thing today was that firstly it rained (we need the rain), but also there was a pair of galahs (pink and grey cockatoos) on the powerlines. They were preening themselves joyfully in the rain, regularly swinging round and upside down. It seemed like they were playing, but also enjoying a shower in the rain while they preen. I tried taking a couple of photos, but the sky was too bright behind them s
  6. Ohhh, Sally! Thank you for this! It made me cry. What a darling 🦜 parrot, wish I could hold it. It has such tender eyes. 🥰 Glad you enjoyed it Betty! Yes they are lovely. As Sirocco is so used to people and thinks of himself as a human, he has been taken around New Zealand to teach people about the endangered Kakapo. There seems to be a nice arrangement where he is with humans some of the time but also off in the wild some of the time. I really hoped he might have been doing one of his tours when I was there and I might get the chance to meet him. He is a bit of a rock star in
  7. Here are my three: 1. Seven young people watching the sunset from a high granite rock: 2. Concerned citizens gathered for a community vigil in Perth in January in response to the bushfire crisis in Australia: 3. People gathered to watch Canadian circus artists Quatuor Stomp at the 2018 Fremantle International Street Arts Festival in Western Australia:
  8. Hi Patrik, I think you have some really lovely images. I love the one with the two hammocks, and the landscapes, and there's some nice street and shopfront images too. I get scared looking at the one of the two women jumping in the air on the ledge that is 700m high! My brother just came back from Spain and Portugal, so nice to see some images from places he told me about. I am also fairly new to Alamy and I have just one sale. I think it does take a while on Alamy compared with some other agencies, especially if those agencies are selling the images for much less as mi
  9. I love the idea of budgies rolling around in the snow. It's something they'd never get to do in their natural habitat here. Yes it must be quite a responsibility keeping the chicks alive and well. In 2018 I visited Stewart Island in southern New Zealand. A giant, flightless parrot called a kakapo used to live there. They are extremely endangered and so they moved them to Codfish Island where there are no introduced predators. However, people claim to have heard their call on remote parts of Stewart Island. I hoped I might encounter one, knowing that it was highly unlikely. I though
  10. Interesting to see a T-Rex hitting the town. Hope she enjoyed the movie. Yesterday I discovered a baby stegosaurus had taken up residence in the back garden. I was quite excited, as they were my favourite dinosaur when I was a kid. A bit worried about what will happen when Mama or Papa stegosaurus turn up (they weigh about 3 tonnes!). At least they are herbivores! This is the little guy in the hibiscus tree:
  11. I think he did have a cold beer after the shoot. There's the nicest photo of him with Joelene King who starred in the video:
  12. Thanks Allan. I hadn't heard of gapers before. When really small in the nest, baby birds do seem to be mostly a mouth attached to a body. Must be nature's way of ensuring they get fed! That would have been lovely raising baby budgerigars.
  13. Wow, there's more! Nature comes up with the most artistic designs. Thanks for the link. I hope you are finding some nice little creatures to see and photograph in central Australia.
  14. The 50mm 1.8 is a lovely lens. I was unlucky in that I bought it a few years ago, and then one day the autofocus died 😢 I still use it though with manual focus 🙂
  15. Here is a baby Welcome Swallow. They have a sort of frog-shaped mouth when they are little.
  16. 😂 Ah-ha! That is the rare species Cockatoo megahumungousii. Not a bird to be trifled with!
  17. Ha ha! I think we must have some of the grumpiest seagulls on the planet. On one visit I made to Penguin Island that was meant to be "relaxing", it turned out to be seagull breeding season. They were hovering about a metre above you wherever you went on the island while screeching at full volume relentlessly. I think some international tourists were particularly terrified. Bridled terns nest at a different time on the island in much the same nesting spots, as I saw those last year, and they were not aggressive at all by comparison.
  18. Thanks, that's a brilliant video 😀 😂 Love the music/dance combo. Yes I had seen it before on a nature documentary. It's quite amazing the complex world of small creatures that most of the time we don't see. They are pretty groovy dancers too!
  19. Thanks, I just googled Jurgen Otto and had a look at the variety of colourful peacock spiders. Fantastic! I'd only ever seen photos before and assumed they were bigger, so thought the one in my kitchen was just a regular, small jumping spider. But then I noticed the blue and red and took a photo with my macro lens, and was very excited to realise it was a peacock spider. If you ever want a good laugh, I suggest googling "jumping spider macro". It makes me laugh every time I look at them 🤣 They look like mini alien beings.
  20. Hi Ortho, Yes I can see the links now, and I viewed your Dropbox image at 100%. I agree with Colin, I think that should be fine in terms of ISO. In the staircase image I did see what looks like a small bit of purple colour fringing at the very bottom middle of the image where the wooden floor meets the white curved wall. This is minor in the scheme of things and I only saw it because I zoomed in 100%, so it is unlikely to matter, but if you really wanted to you could remove this in Lightroom. I'm not using Lightroom myself but I believe you do it via the Lens Correction Panel there. Cheers, Sa
  21. Hi Ortho, it just occurred to me to also mention that my Nikon D3000 had the same megapixels as your Nikon D60, so a 10.2 megapixel camera can be ok, providing you are not cropping too much. The D3000 had a CCD sensor like the D60 too. I actually found I got nice panned shots of birds in flight with this sensor that were more similar to film images capturing movement. I haven't been able to replicate this with my Nikon D5200 which has a CMOS sensor. I think it is to do with the way the image forms across the sensor, and think there are sometimes advantages to older cameras for specific purpose
  22. Hi Ortho! Welcome to Alamy. I don't think the sensor size on your D60 should be a problem at all. Most of the images I have submitted have been taken with a Nikon D5200, and just checking the specs that sensor is even slightly smaller than the D60. I've also uploaded images I took with my previous Nikon which was a D3000, another crop sensor. So the sensor size on the D60 itself will not lead you to fail QC. It will be more important that images are in focus and meet Alamy's quality requirements, including checking for dust sensor spots, chromatic aberration etc. You can see the as
  23. Oh ok Ed. I can imagine maybe a small python as a pet (not a big one that might strangle me) but no venomous snake pets for me! There's something inherently scary about cobras!
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