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Sally R

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Posts posted by Sally R

  1. 2 hours ago, John Morrison said:

    These are such strange times. I get mood swings, for no very obvious reasons, and motivation comes and goes. But I've enjoyed my picture-taking these past few weeks... and the fact that, despite everything, Alamy sales are holding up. Cider, you say? Cheers! ūü•ā

     

    Thanks John¬†ūüôā¬†Cheers to you too! ūü•ā

  2. 49 minutes ago, gvallee said:
    1 hour ago, Sally R said:

    Had a really down, demoralising day¬†ūüėʬ†Too much to explain. Drank cider.¬†Feel¬†slightly better¬†ūüėź¬†Will go out and do some photography tomorrow. That always helps ūüôā

     

    Chin up Sally. Tomorrow is a brand new day. Stick to what makes you happy. 

     

    Thanks Gen!! Yes each day is a new one and things always get better¬†ūüėä

  3. On 29/07/2020 at 05:58, The Blinking Eye said:
    On 26/07/2020 at 18:09, Sally R said:

    Hi Kristin, I have ended up with 3 camera bags when I initially only intended to have one, which just kind of organically happened.

     

    I have a camera backpack that has its own waterproof cover that fits neatly under it with velcro and can be pulled out to cover the pack when necessary. The pack has clipped connectors (like buckles I guess) at the waist and chest which takes the weight off your shoulders so that it is less burdensome to carry around. It looks like this:

    https://www.leedervillecameras.com.au/products/cases-straps/cases/sol-/sol-case-model-no-8070

     

    Oh my gosh. I absolutely love this. I don't like things hanging off my shoulders and it doesn't look like a camera bag, at least from the photo.  I had no idea such a thing existed. THANK YOU.

     

    I think this one might be made locally here in Western Australia as the brand seems to be linked to just one particular camera shop here and not anywhere else. However, there would be many other brands with very similar backpacks out there. I find my Lowepro backpack has the most comfortable harness/buckle system. I've jammed it full of stuff and it's had a huge amount of wear and it is still going strong.

    • Thanks 1
  4. On 28/07/2020 at 23:15, spacecadet said:

    The Beehive was indeed designed earthquake-proof, but the old 20s parliament building next door was upgraded in the 90s. Basically they sawed through the foundations and put rubber shock absorbers in between. Which I completely failed to photograph on the tour.

     

    Ah thanks, yes it certainly looks like a good earthquake-proof design.

  5. On 27/07/2020 at 17:46, Allan Bell said:
    On 27/07/2020 at 11:07, Sally R said:

     

    I love this photo Shergar. The scenery is beautiful on its own but having your dog Ben in there as well really makes it. A few years ago I went to Bhutan and there were many dogs wandering about who were friendly. I can remember watching a scene of the sun setting and cloud coming down from the mountains over a village and valley, and this lovely dog just came and watched the scene with me. Your photo reminds me of that memory.

     

    You should have brought that dog back home. He/she was a sole-mate.

     

    Allan

     

    Aww thank you Allan. I love dogs anyway but felt especially connected to this one. Animals are everywhere in Bhutan. Horses and yaks and cows often roam freely. One of the people I travelled with asked one of the guides how the owners of the yaks find them when they need them, and she said the yaks know their own name and respond to it when called. They often have bells as well so you can hear them. It was strange coming home to a place where animals are controlled behind fences and everything seems separated off from everything else and is more regimented somehow. I loved seeing yaks for the first time there.

  6. 10 hours ago, Shergar said:

    TTDYYH.jpg

     

    My 4 year old Gordon setter Ben, a little over 80lbs 

     

    I love this photo Shergar. The scenery is beautiful on its own but having your dog Ben in there as well really makes it. A few years ago I went to Bhutan and there were many dogs wandering about who were friendly. I can remember watching a scene of the sun setting and cloud coming down from the mountains over a village and valley, and this lovely dog just came and watched the scene with me. Your photo reminds me of that memory.

    • Like 1
  7. 53 minutes ago, Michael Ventura said:

    I stopped by her new home today and she seems to be on the mend already.  Her eye is red and puffy but she grabbed a bunch of tubes of numbing drops and that has helped.  And she on sick leave now so yes, time to catch up on sleep and not worry about work for a bit.

     

    That's good news Michael! It will be nice that she can have a bit of a rest and break from work too.

  8. 1 hour ago, Michael Ventura said:

    Got word late last evening that my daughter had a workplace accident.  She was working her shift at the hospital and was putting on an N95 mask when one of the elastic bands snapped and it scraped a cornea.  She was taken to the ER and put on antibiotics and other medication and sent home with a patch over one eye.  Any kind of eye injury really makes me cringe.  Hopefully it will mend okay, she's a tough one.

     

    Hope it mends quickly and all is fine, Michael. My brother was stung in the eye by a jellyfish a few years ago while swimming. It left a bit of a scrape but no damage to his vision at all. Your daughter must be tough with the work she has been doing. Sending good wishes.

    • Like 1
  9. 54 minutes ago, Steve F said:

    I'm loving my ThinkTank Retrospective 7 at the moment. Doesn't scream camera bag and very practical.

     

    Someone else I know really recommends the ThinkTank bags for security because they don't really look like camera bags. I actually turn my Lowepro sling bag round so the label is facing inwards, just so it is a bit less obvious it is carrying a camera. But the ThinkTank ones I've seen are definitely less like a camera bag and less conspicuous.

  10. Hi Kristin, I have ended up with 3 camera bags when I initially only intended to have one, which just kind of organically happened.

     

    I have a camera backpack that has its own waterproof cover that fits neatly under it with velcro and can be pulled out to cover the pack when necessary. The pack has clipped connectors (like buckles I guess) at the waist and chest which takes the weight off your shoulders so that it is less burdensome to carry around. It looks like this:

    https://www.leedervillecameras.com.au/products/cases-straps/cases/sol-/sol-case-model-no-8070

     

    However, as this bag didn't fit my 150-500mm lens I subsequently bought a Lowepro Flipside 15L pack. This is different in that it opens from the opposite side (the side that is against your back when worn) which makes it feel nice and secure. Like the one above it also has a waterproof cover that can be pulled out to protect against rain. I have hiked in heavy rain with this and my camera gear stayed completely dry. It is lightweight and also has the buckles that fasten at the waist and chest. I can carry my big lens attached to my camera plus 2 or 3 smaller ones in it, and even though I'm a small person, the way this pack is supportive I can manage it quite well. By using the buckles, your ab muscles take the weight rather than the shoulders, which I find much easier. I often carry a drink bottle in the side pocket too, and snacks. I have a feeling Lowepro no longer manufacture this specific one, though I just found it is available on Amazon (I'm sure I paid about half the price of this one though):

    https://www.amazon.com.au/Lowepro-Flipside-Sport-Camera-Backpack/dp/B00809MO9S

    I'm sure there are many other similar bags to this one too.

     

    The third bag is a Lowepro shoulder bag that I got as a bonus deal when I bought my Tamron macro lens. This is good when I just want to carry the camera without additional lenses. I can still fit a few extras in here though, and almost always carry things like filters and lens filter attachments, a spare battery if I know I'll need it etc. It is this one:

    https://www.lowepro.com/au-en/passport-sling-iii-grey-and-orange-lp36658-0ww/

     

    If I am going to do a lot of walking I prefer the backpacks so I don't get sore shoulders, but if not, and if not carrying extra lenses, the shoulder sling bag is great. All three bags get regular use. The sling bag is the easiest for quickly retrieving the camera without having to take it off my shoulder. All of them have velcro sections that can be reconfigured how you want them to support and hold lenses and other accessories, as well as additional zip pockets which I find helpful.

     

    Sometimes, if I am just driving down to the ocean or a park for a walk and I think I'd like to take some shots along the way, I don't even bother with a bag and just carry the camera. However, 8 years ago I lived in a bit of a dodgy street. I naively was carrying my camera outside and to and from the car not in a bag. Before long we were broken into and the camera with a new macro lens attached was stolen. My housemate and I had had a weird feeling we had been watched for a couple of days, and he also had his expensive mountain bike stolen. So I now only carry the camera outside a bag in places that it feels safe to do so.

     

    I think a good thing is to go to a camera store or two, have a look at their bags and see if you think they will fit the things you want to carry, if they will be comfortable etc.

    • Upvote 1
  11. 11 hours ago, spacecadet said:

    I won't forgive you for missing the Beehive!

    2AJAB4N.jpg

     

    No, I didn't even photograph the beehive¬†ūüôĀ¬†Terrible, I know. I've wondered before if it is built that way to withstand earthquakes. It seems to have undergone refurbishments to make it more earthquake proof, but still not sure if this was the intent in the original design. I've enjoyed seeing your Wellington and other NZ pics. Would love to go back. It will probably be the first overseas place Australians can visit once Covid-19 subsides.

     

    I experienced a couple of minor tremors while I was there that I thought I might even be imagining, but looked up Wellington Quake Live and found that they had indeed happened. I arrived in Bhutan just after the Nepal quake in 2015, and experienced an aftershock there which was the first time I'd experienced anything like that. It is mostly very geologically stable here in Western Australia, but we do get the odd one and there was one recently in the south near the town of Walpole.

  12. 18 hours ago, Cal said:

    What I will say is since starting stock my eyes have been opened to all kinds of opportunities and things to photograph. I try not to let my creative side wither away but have been increasingly finding I "see" stock photos in certain situations whether pre planned or not, often seemingly mundane.

     

    Yes me too Cal. I was in Wellington New Zealand 6 months prior to starting stock photography. All the time I was focussed on my favourite nature subjects. I'm kicking myself now because there were many opportunities to do much more than that. I was walking through the city with my camera gear on my way to a scenic lookout or a wildlife sanctuary, but not even thinking of taking urban scenes. I just got my camera out when I got to a nature destination involving birds or landscapes. But yes, now everything becomes interesting in terms of stock.

    • Like 2
  13. The Weekend Australian Magazine July 25-26 2020, Pages 38-39 Gardens section

     

    Hellebore Anna's Red

    Contributor: Michael Russell / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: M92X02

    Hellebore Anna's Red Stock Photo

     

    Close up of flower detail of Helleborus Cinderella Ideal for borders and woodland gardens are evergreen and frost hardy

    Contributor: FlowerStock / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: 2B05DMF

    Close up of flower detail of Helleborus Cinderella   Ideal for borders and woodland gardens are evergreen and frost hardy Stock Photo

    • Like 1
    • Upvote 5
  14. 21 hours ago, Alan Beastall said:

    A day out to Bempton Cliffs, Yorkshire.

     

    Puffin. 

    2C8ABMA.jpg

     

     

     

     

    Gannet.

     

    2C8ABP7.jpg

     

     

    I love both of these Alan. I like how the puffin is in the landscape and the yellow flowers in the foreground. I love the gannet too. I've made some attempts at similar shots panning with birds in flight. I have one of an ibis I might upload here that I took a long time ago. I think yours works extremely well.

  15. On 23/07/2020 at 06:48, Betty LaRue said:

    This little American robin fledgling sat on the window well cover to my basement window. It was totally unafraid and allowed me to get quite close. Such a cutie! Patiently waiting for mom or dad to stuff a worm down its gullet.
    As you see, it still has the sharp tip on its beak that it used to peck its way out of the egg.

    american-robin-turdus-migratorius-fledgl

    Edited yesterday at 09:38 by Betty LaRue

     

    I love this Betty. Fledglings do often seem to be much less afraid of us humans than adults birds - so trusting and innocent and often curious. We have a pair of galahs who seem to have a nest in the backyard now, so expecting to hear squawking sometime soon (as baby galahs are VERY LOUD, but loveable at the same time even if somewhat scrawny). Your little robin is incredibly cute and I love the speckled colours.

    • Like 1
  16. 6 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

    I came upon this wild chien outside a pub on Castle Street. I tried to say "hello, I'm a friend" in his language (French? Dog? Scouse?), but he would have none of it. I wanted to turn and run but I managed to keep calm and back away slowly. 

     

    Ah, there is wildlife in your neighbourhood after all Edo! He looks feisty. You did well to carefully back away and not get chomped!

  17. On 22/07/2020 at 01:56, wiskerke said:

    Someone here at some point told us that his/her images of aphids and similar infestations easily outsold pretty images of pretty flowers.

     

    wim

     

    Around the time I started doing stock photography I read an article by a woman who said her best selling image was of a wart or some kind of skin infection she had (can't remember exactly what she said it was). So yes, the not so pretty things are sometimes the best sellers.

  18. 18 hours ago, ChrisC said:

    I've got the Mk3, I found the deal with the Sony Case & grip from a supplier, was well worth buying. I do use mine on my bike and carry it around my neck with the case, rather than in a possible dusty pocket, you do need the wrist strap, but I find the grip helps when grabbing one handed and doesn't make it as slippy in general, if I bought another I'd buy a grip and case for sure

    .

    Others would testify to the benefits of the more expensive version, but as a point and shoot that you can grab extra photos, when not out taking "real photographs", it does the job and of course the sensor is great as it passes Alamy's criteria at a very reasonable price, so I won't be upgrading unless I have to. In the UK the price gap is ridiculous compared to the U.S.

    Mk 3 £479 with case & grip

    Va £799 camera only

    Mk 6 £979 camera only

    Mk 7 £1,179 camera only

    At that price, I'd want something that was more like a mini SLR with interchangeable lenses & viewfinder.

     

    The other thing is of course, unlike with a big camera, you never get the "have you got permission,," or other strange comments.

     

    I tend to use mine on manual, but that's how I shoot on my main camera, I find it hard to use Auto on a camera..

     

    Thanks Chris, I appreciate the info. Yes I do like the idea of an inconspicuous camera that is less likely to worry people in the way that DSLRs sometimes can. I'm quite sure I will be getting this camera at some point, and keeping my eye out for sales that might come up. And yes, an earlier version of it may do the job at a¬†more friendly price¬†ūüôā¬†Cheers, Sally

    • Upvote 1
  19. 3 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

    Again tonight‚ÄĒthe fire alarm and the firetrucks. Again a false alarm. I have to move out of this building. This is nuts!

     

    That's no good at all Edo. Perhaps you can find a new place that is also a great spot for doing photographic expeditions from. I hope things either settle where you are, or you find another place that is better to be in. Sometimes new opportunities come out of situations that aren't going so well. I do hope that if you decide to move that you find a really good spot in a convenient location without any future hassles. 

  20. 1 hour ago, Regis said:

    Thank you Sally,

    Yes this is a very beautiful place.

    It has changed a lot since the first time I went there about 25 years ago.

    At the time it was full of bats, reptiles birds and other animals..

    The only animals I saw this time were wallabies, birds and a few wild piglets. I was a bit afraid to see mama pig, but thankfully, didn't see her at all.

    And the water is nice and warm, and it is free...

    A really nice spot to relax if ever you find yourself in the top end.

     

    Have a good day,

    Regis

     

    I would definitely like to visit there one day. Even though it was cold and grey down here in Perth today, those photos made me feel like going for a swim. I'm glad there were no encounters with mama pig!

  21. 9 hours ago, Regis said:

    Mataranka thermal pool in the Northern Territory of Australia:

     

    I love the light in these ones Regis. I love that time of day - absolutely beautiful with the steam and low angle of the sun. I like the rainbow colours in the water too.

    • Like 1
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