Jump to content

Sally R

Verified
  • Content Count

    833
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Posts posted by Sally R

  1. I started such a list when I first started doing stock photography. There were many ideas, from events, locations to still life ideas.

     

    Now the lists are in my head. However, if I think of a location I will do some research. Sometimes I use google street view to get a sense of the orientation of things relative to where the sun will be or what are the best angles and subjects based on different weather scenarios. However, when I get to a place sometimes things seem different, and what I thought would be a good photographic opportunity doesn't seem so good after all. Instead I find other unexpected opportunities that I wasn't even thinking of. I recently had to visit the Department of Transport and thought while in that location I'd also walk around the area with my RX100 and get some images of local scenes, businesses etc. Not much was jumping out at me though. Instead I ended up photographing the froth on my coffee at a cafe where the barista had artistically created the head of a monkey in the froth! So I think in the end it's a mix of some planning with serendipity for me.

     

    I also enjoy just wandering and discovering along the way and would just love to do what Gen is doing. As I've been feeling lost recently in life generally I have spent a few days just wandering in my car and on foot and followed my intuition without any real plan, thinking things like "This road looks interesting, I'll just see where it goes". I've discovered new things this way and photography has been like a therapy that focusses me on something creative. So I do enjoy exploring without a plan as well.

    • Like 1
    • Upvote 2
  2. New Scientist 26 February 2021

    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2269410-what-you-eat-is-influenced-by-the-food-choices-of-people-you-dine-with/

    Students at lunch time Wantage Hall Reading University student self service restaurant

    Contributor: Peter D Noyce / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: C4YA55

    Students at lunch time Wantage Hall Reading University student self service restaurant Stock Photo

     

    New Scientist 25 February 2021

    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2269131-woolly-mammoths-were-hit-by-climate-change-but-humans-wiped-them-out/

    Wooly Mammoth

    Contributor: Science Picture Co / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: D79R9E

    Wooly Mammoth Stock Photo

     

    New Scientist 24 February 2021

    https://www.newscientist.com/lastword/mg24933231-300-does-long-and-short-sightedness-affect-other-animals-if-so-how-do-they-cope/

    Cute business cat wearing glasses reading notebook (book)

    Contributor: vvvita / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: EJ1NP3

    Cute business cat wearing glasses reading notebook (book) Stock Photo

     

    New Scientist 24 February 2021

    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2269263-virtual-computer-chip-tests-expose-flaws-and-protect-against-hackers/?utm_campaign=RSS|NSNS&utm_source=NSNS&utm_medium=RSS&utm_content=news

    Computer chip in the motherboard, closeup shot, top view.

    Contributor: Sergii Gnatiuk / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: 2BT5RY7

    Computer chip in the motherboard, closeup shot, top view. Stock Photo

     

     

    New Scientist 24 February 2021

    https://www.newscientist.com/lastword/mg24933231-500-this-weeks-new-questions/

    CARS ON MOTORWAY IN THE RAIN

    Contributor: Geoffrey Robinson / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: BH13WP

    CARS ON MOTORWAY IN THE RAIN Stock Photo

     

    New Scientist 17 February 2021

    https://www.newscientist.com/lastword/mg24933221-600-this-weeks-new-questions/

    Male lion carrying one of its cubs - (rare occurrence)

    Contributor: Stephan Schramm / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: KWT37M

    Male lion carrying one of its cubs - (rare occurrence) Stock Photo

     

    Magnet Icon Sign Symbol in Modern Flat Style. Vector Illustration

    Contributor: Yulia Gapeenko / Alamy Stock Vector

    Image ID: PREFPX

    Magnet Icon Sign Symbol in Modern Flat Style. Vector Illustration Stock Vector

     

    New Scientist 12 February 2021

    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2267788-evidence-for-a-hidden-planet-nine-beyond-neptune-has-weakened/

    Hypothesised ninth planet, illustration. Planet Nine is a hypothesized massive planet, first proposed in 2014, that is speculated to orbit far out in the solar system. It has not been detected formally. Instead, astronomers have inferred its presence from

    Contributor: Science Photo Library / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: H2PBH7

    Photographer: MARK GARLICK/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

    Hypothesised ninth planet, illustration. Planet Nine is a hypothesized massive planet, first proposed in 2014, that Stock Photo

     

    New Scientist 8 February 2021

    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2267062-climate-change-is-making-us-hay-fever-season-longer-and-more-intense/

    Flowering grass with departing pollen

    Contributor: Jürgen Kottmann / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: 2E117XR

    Flowering grass with departing pollen Stock Photo

    • Like 2
    • Upvote 4
  3. 10 hours ago, gvallee said:

    The trip to Lady Musgrave Island on the Great Barrier Reef yesterday was out of this world. I am still under the spell.

    First we went snorkelling over the reef, then did a glass bottom boat ride where we saw turtles, then a walk on the island where a colony of white-capped noddies are currently nesting.

    Wow! Another jewel in the crown of Australia.

    Shame I can't upload my GoPro pictures to Alamy, I like them.

     

    https://www.facebook.com/gen.froggie/posts/10222394824253077

     

    For those into marine biology, our guide informed us of an interesting fact... The beche de mer, or sea cucumber, has a fish that lives in its bottom and darts out for prey. If no prey, the fish consoles itself by nibbling the sea slug's internal sexual organs. Charming postal address....

     

    Love the GoPro images Gen. The colours are fantastic. Yes it is a shame you can't upload them to Alamy. The story about the sea cucumber and its tenant is hilarious 😂  

    • Like 1
  4. 7 hours ago, Olivier Parent said:

    Thanks a lot Sally!

    Most of the time, we are allowed to shoot during the first 3 songs without flash, that's the general rule. Sometimes only the first song. And sometimes only one specific song during the body of the show. You may drive/walk/wait for hours and only get 2-3 minutes of shooting so it is important to know how you are going to make the whole thing profitable. Capturing fast moving subjects in very low light can be tricky but that is part of the fun! Full frame sensors really shine in that area. On the other hand, capturing a decent image of someone standing behind a microphone that hides half of his face can also be tricky 😂… The problem with big concerts is that, between the security guys in front of you and the security barriers behind you, there can be 20+ photographers in the pit trying to get a picture, which considerably reduces your ability to place yourself where you want 😄 (and also reduces your ability to sell your images afterwards…). Having 2 cameras/lenses helps a lot! Having identical camera bodies with identical settings is also a thing to consider when you need to be quick. The harness also helps your back, shoulders and neck when you carry your gear something like 12 hours a day for several days (festivals, reportage…). If you do not work for a local newspaper or a magazine, you may have a hard time getting an accreditation for large venues. And be aware that a lot of bands do not allow independent photographers at all nowadays. You also may be asked to sign a paper granting the artists with all the rights on your images, "in perpetuity and for the entire universe"… Or to have them validated before you can use them. The nice thing with big concerts is when you know the photographers around you and some become friends. When all are nice and respectful of each other, everything becomes a lot easier for everyone.

    Edited 5 hours ago by Olivier Parent

    Thanks for the info Olivier. Being vertically challenged (short) I think I might get squashed in the pit at a big gig 😬  Although, as you say, it is nice if the photographers have got to know and are respectful of one another. I think I'll just practice honing my skills but won't get up to your level of professionalism anytime soon. If I was to be carrying gear around at a festival I would definitely consider the harness. I've seen a bird photographer using a harness before for a telephoto lens. It must be tough if you know you only have 1 to 3 songs to get some decent images and it would make you be ultra prepared. Anyway, look forward to seeing more of your concert images 😀

  5. 9 hours ago, Olivier Parent said:

    Thank you Sally!

    Concert photography is not the easiest thing to do these days… 😉

    Most of my concert images (like this one of Asaf Avidan) have been taken with my good old 80-200 f:2.8 (something like 30 years old and very noisy screw drive Minolta lens). I love that lens. Fast, accurate, sharp, nice bokeh, great colors… Lightroom gets rid of the chromatic aberration in most cases. The barrel is all metal so it is virtually indestructible and it can also be used as some kind of weapon if needed 😂. I also have the much more recent Tamron 70-180 f:2.8 which should be a nice alternative to my aging Minolta but will probably not last this long…

    For concert photography, I always put the same gear in the bag:

    • 2 full frame cameras mounted on a Blackrapid double breathe harness (one with a telephoto in the 70-200 f:2.8 range, the other with a wide angle lens)

    • 80-200 f:2.8 for "portraits" (maybe the Tamron in a near future)

    • 24-70 f:2.8 to get the whole band, or the stage, or musicians when they come close enough

    • 16-35 f:2.8 for the public or musicians that I expect to come very close (especially some rock / metal bands who are known to play with photographers)

    • 15mm fisheye f:2.8 to get unusual perspectives

    • 85 f:1.4 because sometimes 2.8 just ain't enough…

    • Ear protection / accreditation / lens hoods!!! 😅

     

    Your concert images are outstanding Olivier! Sharp and clear with no visible noise and capturing fantastic expressions and actions. It makes you feel part of the action looking at the photo, almost as if you could walk into the image and actually be there. Having had a go at it recently I can really appreciate that it isn't easy to achieve those things in concert situations with often limited light. I can see why the harness is a good idea and having two camera bodies. Great to know about your different lens options for different scenarios.

     

    But yes, not much opportunity for this kind of photography at the moment. We are very lucky here with mostly no community transmission, so I was able to attend a concert on the south coast recently. We still had regular reminders over a loudspeaker to socially distance though. It may be a while yet before big concerts at large venues happen again. I saw U2 at a large stadium here in Perth in November 2019 with about 50,000 people. That now seems like another lifetime in a parallel world.

     

    I think the awesome thing about concert photography is capturing a performer in full creative/expressive flow. It's amazing to capture those moments in time.

  6. 1 hour ago, Olivier Parent said:

    Asaf Avidan performing live.

     

    asaf-avidan-2EM3XR9.jpg

    I love your live concert images Olivier. It is something I would like to try more of. Do you have a particular lens that you use most often, such as a 70-200mm? I actually used my Tamron 90mm macro lens to take some recently as it is a fast and sharp lens, but need to do more work to get up to your standard of images. I'm dreaming of a Nikon Z or similar in the future. There is meant to be a very good 70-200mm f2.8 for the Z but also very expensive!

  7. 3 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

    Love the owl.

     

    Allan

    Thanks Allan. I'm sure the surprised expression is him or her seeing their reflection in my camera lens. I took this image 10 years ago. I had been through a very bad time and meeting this owl felt like encountering a guardian angel. Then following my Mum's death last November I had a family of them come and roost here for weeks. One was calling last night so they are still around but the noisy babies have finally grown up and are making adult noises now. They seem to always appear in my life just when I need comforting 🦉

    • Upvote 2
  8. 20 hours ago, John Gaffen said:

    Thanks Sally I managed to make it work by the drag and drop method, although getting the two windows up side by side proved a bit difficult!  

    I find I can just pick it up in one tab and then drag it to the other, if that makes sense? So when I first pick it up I'm only looking at the Alamy website. I drag it into the next tab and then put it where the cursor is in the forum post. So you don't have to be seeing both windows simultaneously. You just have to keep your finger on the mouse and then drop it where you want to put it.

    • Like 1
  9. Anand, you have some beautiful wildlife images in there. Three that stand out for me are the two bee eaters, the jungle owlet and the two African elephants fighting. I agree with Steve and Ed's comments.

     

    What you could try to do if it interests you is to get some more images of people doing things in non-staged settings such as street scenes, local events, that sort of thing, which seems to fit with the kinds of editorial images that can do well at Alamy. You could have a look at the Images Sold thread which can give an idea of what is selling.

     

    Edit: Actually, looking at your images again I can see you do have some "people doing things" images. It's great to capture what is unique and special about your part of the world, how people go about their daily lives etc. I'm hoping to try and do more of that kind of thing. Covid is a factor at the moment too of course, so stay safe and maybe it is something for later and easier to do when activities get more back to normal.

    • Thanks 1
  10. 3 hours ago, John Gaffen said:

    Just sold yesterday, 

     

    Aerial view of Uluru (Aires Rock), Uluṟu–Kata Tjuṯa National Park, Northern Territory, Australia - Image ID: JPXM6N

     

     

    Can anyone tell me why my image wont display please? Or alternatively how I can get it to display properly? 

    Hi John, I'm not sure the method you are using, but the easiest way for me is to just drag and drop from the Alamy website. However, I do this in Google Chrome. It won't work with Safari. I know there is another way to do it from Safari but have forgotten it, but I'm sure it's in other threads. If you drag and drop, you can enlarge the image first on the Alamy website if you want to display it as large, otherwise you'll get a smaller image. If you want to make sure the image dimensions don't distort, you can click on it in your post and there is a box that appears where you can click to keep the correct dimensions. I find the distortions don't occur when dragging the large version of the image where this box is automatically ticked, but need to tick it when dragging the smaller image. Hope that helps and makes sense.

    • Like 1
  11. Great topic and love the images people have posted.

     

    A close up of worn detail on a wooden door in the historic Wangdichholing Palace in Jakar, Bhutan

     

    a-close-up-of-a-well-worn-door-at-wangdichholing-palace-built-in-1857-in-jakar-in-the-bumthang-district-of-bhutan-2B11Y53.jpg

     

    The many windows in the early 1960s architecture of the Fremantle Port Authority Building

     

    fremantle-port-authority-administration-building-built-in-1963-and-opened-in-1964-located-at-victoria-quay-fremantle-harbour-western-australia-2ATM81A.jpg

     

    A bungalow at night at Rottnest Island - the light through the open doorway and slats providing a feeling of welcoming warmth in the darkness

     

    bungalow-at-night-at-the-thomson-bay-settlement-on-rottnest-island-western-australia-the-bungalows-were-built-in-the-1920s-2AP4W08.jpg

     

    • Like 2
  12. Smithsonian Magazine 12 February 2021

    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/14-Fun-Facts-About-Bright-Pink-Animals-180977021/

    Hopkins Rose under a snoot, Southern California.

    Contributor: Stocktrek Images, Inc. / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: KE2MP4

    Photographer: Brook Peterson/Stocktrek Images

    Hopkins Rose under a snoot, Southern California. Stock Photo

     

    Pygmy seahorse (Hippocampus bargibanti) sheltering in seafan (Muricella sp.) Bitung, North Sulawesi, Indonesia. Lembeh Strait, Molucca Sea.

    Contributor: Nature Picture Library / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: W7WP21

    Photographer: Alex Mustard

    Pygmy seahorse (Hippocampus bargibanti) sheltering in seafan (Muricella sp.) Bitung, North Sulawesi, Indonesia. Lembeh Strait, Molucca Sea. Stock Photo

     

    THE SHOCKING PINK DRAGON MILLIPEDE, DESMOXYTES PURPUROSEA.

    Contributor: Oliver Thompson-Holmes / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: EF1HMX

    THE SHOCKING PINK DRAGON MILLIPEDE, DESMOXYTES PURPUROSEA. Stock Photo

     

    Hakai Magazine 19 February 2021

    https://www.hakaimagazine.com/news/can-a-cold-water-bath-save-the-great-barrier-reef/

    Snorkeller conducting underwater survey of coral health, Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia. No MR or PR

    Contributor: Suzanne Long / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: 2AA1YNX

    Snorkeller conducting underwater survey of coral health, Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia. No MR or PR Stock Photo

     

    Science 19 February 2021

    https://science.sciencemag.org/content/371/6531/twil

    Hand on Umbrella Long Tailed Macaques Macaca Fascicularis Monkey Forest Ubud Bali Indonesia

    Contributor: dbimages / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: AMKD1N

    Photographer: Jeremy Graham

    Hand on Umbrella Long Tailed Macaques Macaca Fascicularis Monkey Forest Ubud Bali Indonesia Stock Photo

    • Like 1
    • Upvote 6
  13. Australian Geographic 15 February 2021

    https://www.australiangeographic.com.au/blogs/creatura-blog/2021/02/the-red-footed-booby-has-a-rainbow-paddle-pop-beak/

     

    A white phased red footed booby (sula sola) on a branch with red coloured feet, Genovesa island, Galapagos national park, Ecuador.

    Contributor: Sébastien Lecocq / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: 2AC4T77

    A white phased red footed booby (sula sola) on a branch with red coloured feet, Genovesa island, Galapagos national park, Ecuador. Stock Photo

     

    Red-footed Booby (Sula sula), brown variant, sitting on branch, Genovesa Island, Tower Island, Galápagos Islands

    Contributor: imageBROKER / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: CXR5TW

    Photographer: Ingo Schulz

    Red-footed Booby (Sula sula), brown variant, sitting on branch, Genovesa Island, Tower Island, Galápagos Islands Stock Photo

     

    Red Footed Booby (Sula sula) couple, Clarion Island, Revillagigedo Archipelago Biosphere Reserve / Archipielago de Revillagigedo UNESCO Natural World Heritage Site (Socorro Islands), Pacific Ocean, Western Mexico, January

    Contributor: Nature Picture Library / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: 2AADGE2

    Photographer: Claudio Contreras

    Red Footed Booby (Sula sula) couple, Clarion Island, Revillagigedo Archipelago Biosphere Reserve / Archipielago de Revillagigedo UNESCO Natural World Heritage Site (Socorro Islands), Pacific Ocean, Western Mexico, January Stock Photo

     

    • Like 3
    • Upvote 5
  14. On 15/02/2021 at 21:54, David Pimborough said:

    I spent three months there on my way to New Zealand they lived in Cooloongup and while there I used to spend a lot of time on the beach and mooching around Rockingham, Fremantle and Perth  :).  I took a bike with me and cycled up and down that beach often.

     

    Though spending Xmas there in 38 degree heat was novel :D

     

    16 babies?! Well there was a tendency for large families back in the day my great grandmother (from Anglesey) had 13 😵

    It would have been nice cycling around there. I used to live close to Fremantle and my favourite ride was down to Woodman Point and back. I'd sometimes see sea lions in the morning at Woodman Point. But I never cycled all the way to Rockingham. Will get down there for a cycle one day.

     

    It was 40 degrees in Perth on the Christmas Day just gone, but I was fortunate enough to be on the south coast in Albany where it was about half that. Hoped to see a white Christmas when I was in Vancouver years ago but alas no snow. It is my only experience of a cold(ish) Christmas.

    • Like 1
  15. 2 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

    I used to wonder if we all saw different colours (colors).  What I see as blue someone else might see it as green or red but still call it blue as that what they were told that colour was when they were youngsters.

     

    Bit simplified explanation but give you the gist.

    I've read some interesting articles before about perceptions of colour in different cultures. Not all cultures have colour words, or the same ones as in English. Some might not have a word for blue, for example. In one case I read about the Warlpiri people here in Australia having a word that translates as what a tree branch looks like after it has rained rather than a specific abstract colour word for that. There is a rich language to describe how things look without reference to colour, if that makes sense. It's like what we perceive is enculturated, so what one person sees and what language they use can be different from someone else. Perception is a very interesting thing and it definitely varies between people.

     

    It's interesting to think about EVFs as a reassembly similar to the way our brains reassemble the electrical signals they receive. It's like we have our own internal EVF but one that is shaped by culture and what we learn growing up 🤔  

    • Like 1
  16. 1 hour ago, David Pimborough said:

    That takes me back a bit I used to fish off that beach with my uncle and cousin 10:30 at night up to my knees in luke warm water :D

    Oh wow! I'm guessing you were either living or holidaying there back then? I can imagine it was a peaceful spot to be fishing 10:30 at night. I find it an interesting location for photography as it faces roughly north because of the way the land curves around, whereas in most places in Perth you are looking out west when at the ocean. So I think it would be a good sunrise spot as well because you kind of have the sun rising to your right but casting light across in front of you and potentially colouring any clouds that might be there.

     

    I can see you are in North Wales. My highest % of ancestry is Welsh and I'd like to visit there one day. I'd love to see Snowdonia and that general area. My relatives who were Jones's (no surprise there for Welsh people) were from Swansea, so would be interesting to see down there as well. My Welsh great grandmother had 16 babies!

  17. Australian Geographic 1 February 2021

    https://www.australiangeographic.com.au/blogs/creatura-blog/2021/02/the-spanish-dancer-is-lovely-and-almost-ludicrously-large/

    Female scuba diver look at on Spanish Dancer (Hexabranchus sanguineus) swim in night. Red sea, Egypt, Africa

    Contributor: Andrey Nekrasov / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: DPH1TN

    Fenmale scuba diver look at on Spanish Dancer (Hexabranchus sanguineus) swim in night. Red sea, Egypt, Africa Stock Photo

     

    Emperor Shrimp, Periclimenes imperator,riding on an Spanish Dancer Nudibranch, Hexabranchus sanguineus. Tulamben, Bali, Indonesia. Pacific Ocean.

    Contributor: BIOSPHOTO / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: 2D97742

    Photographer: Steven Kovacs / Biosphoto

    Emperor Shrimp, Periclimenes imperator,riding on an Spanish Dancer Nudibranch, Hexabranchus sanguineus. Tulamben, Bali, Indonesia. Pacific Ocean. Stock Photo

     

    [Also another one of an Emperor Shrimp in this article attributed to Blue Planet Archive/Alamy Stock Photo but I just could not find it on Alamy].

     

    Australian Geographic 8 February 2021

    https://www.australiangeographic.com.au/blogs/creatura-blog/2021/02/the-crested-wood-partridge-is-just-fabulous/

    Crested wood partridge

    Contributor: Rob potter / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: 2B61YPJ

    Crested wood partridge Stock Photo

     

    Roul-roul Partridge or Crested Wood Partridge (female), Rollulus rouloul, Phasianidae, Galliformes, Southeast Asia.

    Contributor: Naturepix / Alamy Stock Photo

    Image ID: BC10KD

    Roul-roul Partridge or Crested Wood Partridge (female), Rollulus rouloul, Phasianidae, Galliformes, Southeast Asia. Stock Photo

    • Upvote 5
  18. 18 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

    Looks like you have hit the nail on the head. Like the numberplate.  2POTS would indicate the number of cylinders the engine has.

     

    Allan

    Thanks Allan. I like the number plate too and you've explained its meaning to me. It's interesting reading about the history of the car. It was originally designed to encourage farmers to motorise who were still relying on horses. I learn something whenever I have to do my keywords.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.