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dlmphotog

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Posts posted by dlmphotog


  1. Mature man dressed in a black long sleeve shirt, black cowboy hat and jeans holding a coiled lasso at gate Stock Photo

     

     

     

     

    Mature man dressed in a black long sleeve shirt, black cowboy hat and jeans holding a coiled lasso at gate Stock Photo

     

     

     

     

    This is one tough looking Paniolo (Hawaiian Cowboy) who was kind enough to let me photograph him at the staging area for the 54th annual Makawao Rodeo Parade, Makawao, Maui, Hawaii, USA. The Fujinon XF 200mm f2 is such a sweet lens! Great subject isolation and sharp enough to cut yourself on. 😀

     

     

     

     

    • Like 2

  2. 3 hours ago, robvann said:

    My challenge is that I am used to using the Canon F4 USM 24-105 Lens which gets me effectively 170mm zoom, which I want.

     

    Fujifilm makes the FUJINON LENS XF18-135mmF3.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR   lens review

    Fujifilm also just released the FUJINON LENS XF16-80mmF4 R OIS WR            lens review

     

    Both lens are designed to be weather resistant and use a very effective optical image stabilization. I just ordered the XF 16-80 which as received great reviews, it will be replacing my already outstanding XF 18-55mm. I would recommend you consider the Fujifilm camera system as they listen to photographers and consistently offer new features and upgrades via firmware updates.

     

    Hope this helps,

     

    David L. Moore

    • Upvote 2

  3. Wet cleaning is not a spooky mystery that can only be done by a trained professional off site for a cost. It's a skill and like any skill it takes time to develop. IMHO you would have to work very hard and disregard directions to actually damage your camera. Take your time, take a break, repeat until clean and don't stress (to much) as the sensor is safe behind it's protective cover glass.

     

    Like a tradesman that keeps his/hers tools sharp, clean and in good working order.

    • Like 1

  4. 3 hours ago, CAROL SAUNDERS said:

    I was probably extremely heavy handed at the time.  I remember I had spent hours looking how to do it and probably got a bit too carried away.  All I remember is that when I shot anything at F8 or over there was a huge score mark/line across every image. It definately wasn't the lens that was faulty as I used various lenses at the time.   Ended up selling the camera for parts at the time.  Lesson learned - for me anyway !

     

    Carol

     

    It sounds like it was a smear/smug left on the sensor cover glass by the solution. This has happen to me. I had to use entire box of sensor swabs one time and they are not cheap but I did get the sensor cover glass clean.

     

    I understand that wet cleaning is not for everyone and we all have to decide whats best for ourselves and our own comfort level.


  5. I think every serious photographer should have the skills and proper tools to wet clean their own sensor. There is clear glass over the sensor so your not "touching" the actual sensor.

     

    The product recommended by most camera manufacturers is photosol Eclipse solution and sensor swabs.

     

    Now the weird part, I like using a HEPA vacuum/small shop vac on lowest power setting when cleaning my cameras and lenses, sucks out the dust rather than blowing it around. 🤔

    • Upvote 1

  6. On 29/08/2019 at 08:58, Jan Brown said:

    I just tried that and, as I've found in the past, it just stops allowing me to type. Is there some trick I'm missing?

    You're right about the tags, of course, but it's annoying when I'm in mid-flow and I can't fit in the informative sentence I wanted to type. Hey ho.

     

    Jan,

     

    Sorry I misunderstood your question. I do not know how to do what you want online. I do all my captioning/key-wording off-line using a word processor then cut and paste the captions/keywords into the RAW file metadata using Adobe Bridge. When I upload, long captions automatically end up in Additional info but I do have to lookout for truncated captions and word fragments.

     

    I feel very strongly that the best practice is to spend your time captioning and key-wording the source of the image, be that a RAW file or JPEG. This metadata along with your contact info and copyright notice stays with your image no matter where it "goes" and you only have to do it once.

     

    Hope this helps,

     

    David L. Moore, DLM-Photog

    • Like 1

  7. Jan,

     

    When the Caption text is past the 150 charter limit it automatically carries over to Additional info field where the entire Caption is displayed. With long captions I find I need to truncate the Caption at a logical place so I don't have word fragments or incomplete locations.

     

    All the KEY words from the Caption should be in the Tag (keyword) field anyway so a truncated Caption is not good but not a hindrance to buyers finding your images.


  8. Putting a copyright notice in your metadata is not the same as registering your images with the US copyright office. I forget the details but copyright infringement of registered images offers the photographer higher compensation for the infringement. You can duckduckgo the details...

     

    I'm a BIG advocate for putting as much metadata onto your RAW files as practical. Besides the Alamy required fields of Description and Keywords/Tags each of your RAW images should also have your contact info and copyright notice.

     

    Unfortunately US copyright office has made registering images more tedious and costly. You can only register 750 images at a time for a cost of $55.00. You also need to make an Excel spreadsheet with the names of the images... I'm sure there are online resources for a step by step walk through of the process. Even with all the hassle and cost I always register my images.

     

    Hope this helps,

    David

     


  9. Regardless of what software solution you choose I think it is VERY importation to have as much metadata attached to your RAW files as practical. The RAW file is the source for all processed images so having the metadata inputted at the beginning saves you from needless redundant tasks later on.

     

    As for the metadata I first start by inputting my contact info (name, address, phone, web site, email) and copyright notice. With Adobe Bridge this can be done with a saved metadata template and done in batches.

     

    The two must have fields for Alamy are the Description and Keywords (Tags) fields. As far as I know these are the only two fields Alamy uses.

     

    But I also include a title and origin info such as city, state/province and country. This is more for finding/sorting images in my DAM

     

    Hope this helps,

     

    David


  10. I would go with your gut feeling and donate the images to a worthy cause.

     

    Don't worry to much image theft, its going to happen. I register my images with the US copyright office and think of documented commercial image theft as an income opportunity 😀

     

    I would draw up a simple image usage rights, terms and conditions paperwork spelling out what the donated images can be used for (advertising, editorial...) for how long,  you retain the copyright to the images and that the images can NOT be sold or licensed to anyone.

     

    Hope this helps,

     

     

    • Like 1

  11. IMHO, Unless you have an offsite backup you are not backing up at all...

     

    I use "Just a Stack of HDs" methodology, meaning I clone each on my 9 HD's and SSD's drives (not all images) on to hard disks that I store in a padded metal watertight surplus 50 cal ammo can. I have three sets of these that I rotate with one set always at my wife's office. I rotate them about once every three months. My Blu-ray archive is onsite, something I need to fix.

     

    I have read of cloud storage companies going belly up with subscribers losing their data, rare for sure but something to worry about. another factor with cloud storage is the time and bandwidth to upload gigabytes of data.

     

    Hope this helps,


  12. nio-mon-two-story-gate-is-the-main-entrance-of-kiyomizu-dera-temple-kiyomizu-higashiyama-ku-kyoto-honshu-japan-TA4MYD.jpg
    Nio-mon two-story gate is the main entrance of Kiyomizu-dera Temple, Kiyomizu, Higashiyama-ku, Kyoto, Honshu, Japan
     
     
     
    male-performers-carrying-the-seiryu-blue-dragon-on-the-stone-steps-of-the-sai-mon-west-gate-during-the-seiryu-e-festival-kiyomizu-dera-temple-kiyomi-T7DM2M.jpg
    Male performers carrying the Seiryu blue dragon on the stone steps of the Sai-mon West gate during the Seiryu-e Festival, Kiyomizu-dera Temple, Kiyomizu, Higashiyama-ku, Kyoto, Honshu, Japan
     
     
     
    restaurants-along-the-pontocho-overlooking-the-kamogawa-river-at-dusk-kashiwayacho-nakagyo-ku-kyoto-honshu-japan-TCA90K.jpg
    Restaurants along the Pontocho overlooking the Kamogawa River at dusk, Kashiwayacho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto, Honshu, Japan
    • Like 1

  13. On 04/05/2019 at 09:44, wiskerke said:

     

    For that you need to put an adapter on it. Mine are from Lensmate. But there are other brands and solutions, including Sony's own.

    I started out making my own like this one.

    However I see no need for them anymore. I have used those for filters; close-up lenses; lens shades and wide and tele converters (1; 2), but now we have 24mm all the way to 200mm (ff equivalent). (Initially it was 28-100mm on the mk1 and 2.) Darkening of the sky is much easier and more controlled in post. The lens is not very flare prone. Just for looking through a window or a fish in a pond, one can easily hold a filter in front of the lens with 2 fingers. The RX100 is small enough.

     

    wim

     

    Wim,

     

    Thank you for the info on mounting a filter to the RX100. The size of the RX100 is just right. I still would like to see a tube that encapsulates the telescoping elements of the lens as this is the biggest point of failure on these types of cameras. Sure it would add to the size, but for the protection I would take the trade off.

     

    A polarizing filter is the only filter that can not be duplicated in post. A polarizing filter does more the darken the sky it also saturates the image by removing glare/reflections/haze.

     

    David

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