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Steve Valentia

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Everything posted by Steve Valentia

  1. Not in Ireland unless you fly commercially and outside of the restrictions, then you need Public Liability Insurance.
  2. Having made the OP, I'm now considering not buying the €3800 drone, but the Phantom 4 Pro, which in Ireland is €1600 (about £1300) for the basic set up. I'm not sure if they can be hired, but I had someone send me a .dng file from a cheaper model, the Phantom 3 (about €1000) and that looked almost Alamy passable with a bit of tweaking. I was called by a graphic designer this morning who wants me to do some exteriors of hotels and she was interested in the addition of a drone for that work, so it may be worth the investment, even at my laughably low €800 a day, rate. I'm still at the deciding stage though and may give it a week to consider my options.
  3. 1. Yes, fill in the form as Photographer and guardian or perhaps have your partner (if you have one) to fill in the Guardian part and sign it. 2. You need a form to cover each "shoot" (the same set of images taken in one "sitting" or within a specific time frame). This is covered on the form with "date and time of shoot" information. 3. (Same form question) See 2, above. 4. There's only the PDF version of the form. I hope that helps, Steve
  4. Hi Wim, no I hadn't, thank you for sharing. It makes very interesting reading, and I expected that the Zenmuse X5 would come out on top. The Inspire 1 Pro (which uses that lens) was my first consideration, but the €3800 price tag is a bit too steep. However, things got more interesting, for me, as I went deeper into the review and found a comparison chart between the lens on the Phantom 4 Pro and the Canon EOS 1D II, which had very close test results. I still own the 1Ds II and use it successfully for Alamy submissions on a regular basis. So, this was encouraging. I can also see that DXO compared the P4P lens to a Canon G7, and I'd be interested to know if anyone is passing QC with that camera, currently. For me, these are important "real world" tests, as the real arbiter here is QC. Betty LaRue Said... I have a son-in-law who flies drones. He builds his own. One thing I know. Unless you are adept at electronic games where you need to use both thumbs while visualize the scene on a connected tablet, the crashes and expenses of repairs will eat you up. He's very good at flying, but still is ordering parts constantly. The technology that enables drones to fly safely without crashing is developing all the time. The two drones that I am interested in have obstacle avoidance sensors all around and underneath them, intelligent flight mapping to allow them to follow a route and/or a moving object and the capacity to automatically return "home" when the battery is more than 1/3rd empty without hitting anything on the way back. They are basically, as fool-proof as they can get, and some actually do fly themselves. OK, they might crash, but I might trip and fall downstairs or reverse my car into a wall today. I'll try to take the same precautions to avoid this as much as I can, but at the same time, I will want to go downstairs and drive my car. I also want to fly a drone (I think). The sensor is, I believe the same 1" as in the Sony RX series cameras and they pass qc ok here. Can you let me know where you saw the information about the sensor, please. This is the sort of thing I was asking about in the OP and I'd like to confirm that it's actually the Sony RX sensor. Can't find the forum post (drone forum) where it was stated that they are the same sensors as RX series, but the website says "The onboard camera has been redesigned to use a 1-inch 20-megapixel CMOS sensor", which should be able to pass Alamy QC. The Phantom 3 1/2.3” CMOS which is 6.17 X 4.55mm as used in many cell phones, so no good here. The big factor here in the UK, besides the initial cost of the drone/gimbal/camera is the expense of the CAA training and testing which is required to get PfCO. Thanks for the sensor information. In terms of "licensing": In Ireland, you are required to register the drone with the IAA. However, there is no distinction between a hobbyist and commercial drone user; IF you stay within the IAA restrictions for flying it, which include: no more than 400m high, no more than 300m from the launch site, not over built up areas, not over more than 12 people and no take off or landing from private land without permission. Other than that, you CAN work commercially without further training and authorisation. Although with the approval (following training and a flight test) you can APPLY to fly outside of the restrictions - and you need to give 90 days notice, so it's not always commercially viable. There is no restriction on selling images that are taken while flying within the IAA limitations.
  5. That was interesting for me, but only because I live not too far away (I was actually in Ballydehob on Friday). But, your post is a bit like saying "this guy has a camera and takes great images that will pass Alamy". There's no mention of what drone(s) he uses, the camera, sensor size or anything else as far as I can see on the website.
  6. Hi Wim, no I hadn't, thank you for sharing. It makes very interesting reading, and I expected that the Zenmuse X5 would come out on top. The Inspire 1 Pro (which uses that lens) was my first consideration, but the €3800 price tag is a bit too steep. However, things got more interesting, for me, as I went deeper into the review and found a comparison chart between the lens on the Phantom 4 Pro and the Canon EOS 1D II, which had very close test results. I still own the 1Ds II and use it successfully for Alamy submissions on a regular basis. So, this was encouraging. I can also see that DXO compared the P4P lens to a Canon G7, and I'd be interested to know if anyone is passing QC with that camera, currently. For me, these are important "real world" tests, as the real arbiter here is QC. Betty LaRue Said... I have a son-in-law who flies drones. He builds his own. One thing I know. Unless you are adept at electronic games where you need to use both thumbs while visualize the scene on a connected tablet, the crashes and expenses of repairs will eat you up. He's very good at flying, but still is ordering parts constantly. The technology that enables drones to fly safely without crashing is developing all the time. The two drones that I am interested in have obstacle avoidance sensors all around and underneath them, intelligent flight mapping to allow them to follow a route and/or a moving object and the capacity to automatically return "home" when the battery is more than 1/3rd empty without hitting anything on the way back. They are basically, as fool-proof as they can get, and some actually do fly themselves. OK, they might crash, but I might trip and fall downstairs or reverse my car into a wall today. I'll try to take the same precautions to avoid this as much as I can, but at the same time, I will want to go downstairs and drive my car. I also want to fly a drone (I think). The sensor is, I believe the same 1" as in the Sony RX series cameras and they pass qc ok here. Can you let me know where you saw the information about the sensor, please. This is the sort of thing I was asking about in the OP and I'd like to confirm that it's actually the Sony RX sensor.
  7. Hi Wim, no I hadn't, thank you for sharing. It makes very interesting reading, and I expected that the Zenmuse X5 would come out on top. The Inspire 1 Pro (which uses that lens) was my first consideration, but the €3800 price tag is a bit too steep. However, things got more interesting, for me, as I went deeper into the review and found a comparison chart between the lens on the Phantom 4 Pro and the Canon EOS 1D II, which had very close test results. I still own the 1Ds II and use it successfully for Alamy submissions on a regular basis. So, this was encouraging. I can also see that DXO compared the P4P lens to a Canon G7, and I'd be interested to know if anyone is passing QC with that camera, currently. For me, these are important "real world" tests, as the real arbiter here is QC. Betty LaRue Said... I have a son-in-law who flies drones. He builds his own. One thing I know. Unless you are adept at electronic games where you need to use both thumbs while visualize the scene on a connected tablet, the crashes and expenses of repairs will eat you up. He's very good at flying, but still is ordering parts constantly. The technology that enables drones to fly safely without crashing is developing all the time. The two drones that I am interested in have obstacle avoidance sensors all around and underneath them, intelligent flight mapping to allow them to follow a route and/or a moving object and the capacity to automatically return "home" when the battery is more than 1/3rd empty without hitting anything on the way back. They are basically, as fool-proof as they can get, and some actually do fly themselves. OK, they might crash, but I might trip and fall downstairs or reverse my car into a wall today. I'll try to take the same precautions to avoid this as much as I can, but at the same time, I will want to go downstairs and drive my car. I also want to fly a drone (I think).
  8. Gen Said: Most people use Phantom 4 which is not suitable for Alamy. So sorry, I have no user experience, I was just trying to help. ************************** Thanks for the help Gen. Actually, I'm now looking at the Phantom 4 Pro, which has an improved 1 inch sensor, 20megapixels Raw, a mechanical shutter (f2.8 - f11) and 4K video. The problem is that I don't know how this translates to an edited image file in terms of noise etc. I'm tempted to try it out though, but may do a bit more digging first.
  9. I had seen it Gen (read it twice to be honest and the singular comment, which expresses a similar query to my own), but thanks for posting. It really doesn't say anything of any real value for me because the only lens it mentions is the one I referred to above. I'm sure there are others and I'm now looking at the Phantom 4 Pro, which has a different lens, but it may be enough. That's why I was asking for user experience to be honest.
  10. After 35 years in professional photography, I'm kicking myself that I didn't discover the sit-on-and-ride models of cameras now on the market. I could have saved myself a lot of hassle walking around the streets of the world when all I had to do was climb aboard my SLR. Thanks for the heads-up.
  11. You are to be congratulated. Alamy now has over 100 million images online (I'm old enough to be able to imagine this as a pile of 35mm transparencies and it would be bigger than several Volvo's stacked on top of each other, I guess.) To have 4 sales with only 615 images contributed is nothing short of miraculous. We probably need a new metaphor to describe your contribution in the greater scheme of things, as "a drop in the ocean" doesn't come close. My advice is to concentrate on building up your collection of images (at least try to put a 0 on the end of your total) and let Alamy get on with selling them, for now. You may not feel so cheated when you're selling 4 a week. Yes you could look at it in that way. I just reacted to the difference in price. I know what your concern was, but my advice is to get more images online and then the smaller sales will be compensated for by the bigger ones. My lowest so far is €4 and my biggest is €1100.
  12. You are to be congratulated. Alamy now has over 100 million images online (I'm old enough to be able to imagine this as a pile of 35mm transparencies and it would be bigger than several Volvo's stacked on top of each other, I guess.) To have 4 sales with only 615 images contributed is nothing short of miraculous. We probably need a new metaphor to describe your contribution in the greater scheme of things, as "a drop in the ocean" doesn't come close. My advice is to concentrate on building up your collection of images (at least try to put a 0 on the end of your total) and let Alamy get on with selling them, for now. You may not feel so cheated when you're selling 4 a week.
  13. My apologies if this has previously been discussed at length already. I'm in the market for a drone and at first considered the DJI Inspire 1 Pro, with X5 Zenmuse lens. However, at €3800, it would take me a lot of sales to recover the initial outlay and I'm wondering if it's going to be worth it, as I don't plan on doing much else with it. Is anyone using a drone with a less superior camera, perhaps the X3 Zenmuse, and getting through QC with it? I would welcome any actual-experience views on what drones and lenses you are using to get through QC, please. But, perhaps not "I hear such-and-such drone/lens is good and/or should pass because of it's specs", as it's too much of a risk to take financially with the outlay. Thanks for any concrete advice. Steve
  14. Apologies in advance if this is being discussed elsewhere. When I try to use iPad to view and keyword in the new image manager, The panels become jumbled, often superimposed on each other and I can't see the images easily. Is anyone else this problem? Better question would be is there a way to view the image manager well in the iPad? I am using Safari but am open to suggestions for a better alternative. Thanks, Steve
  15. I've sold any number of images where the keywords haven't been sequential. I'll not be wasting time on getting tagging perfect. To paraphrase Eric Morcambe (or Eddie Braben, to be precise)...I'll use all the right words, but not necessarily in the right order.
  16. well I read the blog about tagging four times meanwhile, they don't say anything about that - do you know where they say it matters? I'm gong by a number of posts on the forum, one not too long ago. Jill So, are you saying that Alamy think it's important or that the forum members think it's important? It's not the same thing.
  17. I think this is a great shame and a possible flaw in the system. Essential keywords were no more than 50 characters, far less than 40 words. Why should we need to increase the tags if it's not warranted to get "green" discoverability. This is only likely to reduce the CTR rate and flood the buyers screens with spam images.
  18. You can easily test this yourself.. take one of your images, complete all of the "optional fields" about number of people, releases, etc. Then add a number of meaningless tags and keep adding them until you see your discoverability turns green. You can then delete all of the meaningless tags again once you have your answer! See my post above Matt.
  19. I have just tweeted Alamy to ask about this. It seems that no matter how many sections I complete (including uploading model releases and checking some restrictions), I still get poor discoverability. If it's down to the number of keywords, I would suggest that "less is more" and this is what I understand Alamy to have encouraged over the 12 years I have been with them. I would definitely like to see some clarification on this. UPDATE: I added 41 tags to some images and the discoverbility bar went to green (around 75%). I think this is a great shame and a possible flaw in the system. Essential keywords were no more than 50 characters, far less than 40 words. Why should we need to increase the tags if it's not warranted to get "green" discoverability. This is only likely to reduce the CTR rate and flood the buyers screens with spam images.
  20. Has anyone else noticed that their dashboard has not been updated for a while? Mine was last updated on 25th January, whereas I would usually see an update (cleared balance, new sales etc) within 24 hours. Any insight into what might be happening is welcome. Steve
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