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Steve Tucker

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Posts posted by Steve Tucker

  1.  

     

    I always shoot everything hard-set to daylight. It worked in the day of film. I vastly prefer the results rather than AWB. For instance, if I'm shooting a street market at night, I WANT the bulb lights to show a warm glow and not look like pure white leds. Daylight. all one needs.

    OK but (forgive my ignorance) if you shoot AWB can't you just switch to daylight in PP anyway if shoting RAW?

     

    Yes it doesn't matter what WB you use for raws. I just use AWB and then As Shot in LR as a starting point when processing raws. It can be and frequently is way off so I modify this to taste in the raw conversion. This is why the question of how cameras measure it (original post) is of interest to me and still unresolved it seems, but it's only academic if shooting raw .

     

    Thanks for clarifying MDM, or can I call you M?

  2. I always shoot everything hard-set to daylight. It worked in the day of film. I vastly prefer the results rather than AWB. For instance, if I'm shooting a street market at night, I WANT the bulb lights to show a warm glow and not look like pure white leds. Daylight. all one needs.

    OK but (forgive my ignorance) if you shoot AWB can't you just switch to daylight in PP anyway if shoting RAW?

  3. Most of my shots on Alamy (not many) are taken with the D800 and a 24-70, I had one of the early one's and was having a few issues with QC which I was putting down to poor technique but then one day I dropped the camera and smashed the back off and chipped some of the filter thread off the 24-70. I sent it in to Nikon UK and it was turned around really quickly with a new back. I didn't do anything with the lens. Now it might be coincidence but I swear my IQ imprved after that repair although Nikon dodn't mention anything about the Left Hand focus issue that was prevalent on early D800's. 

    I did a photo assignment this week in London and was using a D800 with the 24-70 and took the Fuji X-E1 with the 55-200 purely because I couldnt be bothered with the weight of the Nikon 70-200 2.8. 

    I have had the Fuji for a long time but have  hardly used, however I was impressed by how good a job it did and I will certainly be using it more in future, the resultng images were straight out of Lightroom to the client whereas the D800 images needed more PP in CS6 to get them how I liked and were probably slightly better to my eye when finished.

  4. I can only give you my personal experience. I use a D800 for landscape and bought a Fuji X-E1 not long after they came out. It ,makes a great landscape camera and is used by some landscape pro's too. I did have the 18mm and the 35mm lens but recently bought the 55-200 which I am very pleased with. I was waiting for the 16-55 to come out as this will make a great partner with the 55-200 and then I will only need 2 lenses. Alternatively the 18-50 (55?) kit lens would also be OK as it is not a bad lens or so I have read.

     

    I use the X-E1 when I have to carry far such as up mountains or when portability is important. I am very pleased with the results. The X-E1 has been superseded but would still be a good buy second hand.

  5. Well the image has been passed by QC, I did clone out the grass head on the face and reduced to  5128 longest side.

    Also only 20 results when I put a very obvious search term in for anyone who knows a bit about sheep ;)

     

    Off to keyword I am then.

     

    Thanks for all the advice with this, I eventually decide to follow the wisdom and experience of Mr Greenberg :)

    Thanks to David also for Piccure post, interesting stuff I must look closer at.

  6. This is interesting to me, if for no other reason than the fact I actually like a larger camera. I prefer it. I like the ergonomics, the size of the controls. I use a D700 (always with attached vertical grip) and D4. Sometimes older bodies like D3, but they're all much a muchness size-wise. I've tried the X100 and the Nikon DF and other smaller-bodied beasties . . . but still I actually prefer the bigger D700/D4. Coupled with my not-too-small hands, a good elasticized strap and wander-lust, my D700 can rest easily that when I eventually replace her, it'll be with a similarly sized machine.

     

    I'm surely not alone in this . . . ummm . . .

     

    dd

     

    +1 as I too said  earlier, so you are not alone ;)  ergonomics play a big part in this and buttons and dials are a part of this, it is far easier to use buttons and dials that are in the right place than it is to start going into a menu system. The D800 and D4S just work for me ergonomically. The X-E1 even though I have added a grip does not.

  7. hmmm, well I use the Fuji X-E1 and they are a great carry about camera, I often go in the mountains and wild camp to take pictures. I have stopped taking the D800 for this. But I disagree that the bell tolls for the DSLR, not yet anyway.

     

    Personally I prefer the ergonomics of a DSLR for normal use and the mirrorless have a long way to go with fps, AF tracking and resolution in many cases. I think they will probably get there but when you (or they) say obsolete for professional use I think they are forgetting about sports and wildlife photography and probably studio work.

    Mirrorless sales are down too are they not.

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