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Tom Reichner

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About Tom Reichner

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Alamy

  • Alamy URL
    https://www.alamy.com/contrib-browse.asp?cid={B9425847-3E92-42E9-AEC5-DAB9FF291E35}&name=Tom+Reichner
  • Images
    125
  • Joined Alamy
    15 Jun 2009
  1. . . . I agree. Sure for sales and general human interest, the ship is the main feature. But personally, I dislike things that are manmade. Buildings, streets, automobiles, contrails, people, and yes, ships ..... I think they are ugly and distracting. I don't want these things in my photos, because to me, photography is about showcasing the things that I think are beautiful, and only nature (devoid of man's presence) is beautiful to me. So the way I would've shot this would be much tighter, with just the moon, the sky immediately around it, and the very top of the ridges on the horizon (the part of the ridge top that doesn't have any lights or buildings in it). Of course, this valuation is based on my own preferences and does not consider the marketability of the image. Stuff with people and manmade things always sells better than straight nature. I guess most people like ugly stuff in their pics
  2. I apologize, Robert; I have no idea what you are talking about, but I really want to know what you are saying. Would you be so kind as to re-write your post, but to do so in a way that a layperson could understand? Specifically, the things you wrote that I don't understand (or understand what they have to do with stock agency image sales) are: the expression "dog at the door" Culture Trip guff "characters" .... "heavy with makeup" (perhaps you are talking about models?) doctorates, and how they might be connected to what we are discussing here Thank you
  3. I have sold at that agency for the last 7 years, and have consistently averaged right around $1.00 USD commission per sale. Every month there are several commissions of $25 to $35, sometimes even significantly more, which keeps the average well above the $0.38 minimum.
  4. I, also, am looking for an answer to this question, as well as general information about the difference between exclusive and non-exclusive RM license types. I am surprised that no one helped you with this issue yet. A few of the specific questions I have: If I have sold an image and it was published (not thru Alamy), am I able to offer an exclusive RM license for that image, if the sale & publication happened several years ago? What about an image that was sold and published last year? What about images that are currently offered on other sites, but have not sold yet? Can those images be offered here on Alamy as Exclusive RM, so long as I remove them from the other site(s). What if an image is offered on another site, but only as a fine art print (no licensing rights are being offered or sold), say, on a site like Fine Art America. Can I offer that image here on Alamy as RM Exclusive? The information I have found on the subject is written in a manner that is over my head, and I have not been able to understand it. It would be great if someone were able to explain these license types in regular, common, not-too-educated everyday english.
  5. It could be said that good photographers show customers what they want. For instance, perhaps a customer knows that they need a photo of, say, a young girl surfing, so they search thru pertinent photos.....they see dozens of acceptable images that will suit their needs, then they see a shot that really stands out and they think, "Wow! I never knew any photo like that existed! It is so much better than anything I had in mind! It will be perfect!" I think that a good photographer's job - his/her goal - is to show customers images that are far more compelling than anything they had in mind for their particular application. In fact, I think this is the greater goal of not just photography, but of art in general,
  6. I would certainly hope so. My current microstock sales exceed $5 per image per year. And that is with my sub-par stuff (I've been saving the good images for Alamy). I sure hope that if my "fair to middlin" images make just under $6.00 per image per year on a single microstock site, that then my BEST images - the really prime stuff - should do significantly better here where they can be sold on a Rights-Managed Exclusive basis. If they don't garner at least that much, then I'd be better off just selling them on microstock, wouldn't I?
  7. Thank you for your explanation, Robert. I am so glad to hear that you do, indeed, have regular sales here on Alamy. If you had "not a sausage" to show for 1400+ images, I would completely change my plans about what to spend the next 6 months of my life doing! I have had Getty request me to join them, but declined, due to a lot of bad reports about giving images away for free as some type of foolish "promotional" idea (and giving the contributors ZERO commission), low-balling, and the like. One contributor I know says that his average commission with Getty is $2.32.....that was over 2 years ago, so it may be even worse now. On the other hand, an Alamy contributor I know said that while he only sells a couple of images a month, his commission per sale is usually between $130 and $190. But then again, that was also over 2 years ago, so that might be down a bit, as well. Given the anecdotal info I received from two different photographers that I know personally, can you see why I would think of Alamy as a "premiere" agency, and why I would think of Getty as a "low end" agency?
  8. So, you have sales at Getty every month, but here on Alamy you have "Not a sausage"? Forgive me, but I am not familiar with the use of the term "sausage" as you are using it here, and therefore I am not sure what it is that you mean. Does that mean that out of your 1409 images here at Alamy, you do not have a single sale? That is hard for me to believe. Why, then, did you bother to spend all of the time uploading, keywording, etc....if it didn't yield even a single sale. Is this place really so terrible as that?
  9. I certainly hope not! The reason I joined Alamy is because it is NOT a microstock agency. I already have a big, successful portfolio on a MS agency, but I needed another agency to market my better images - one that would sell for premium prices on a Rights Managed basis. I feel as though I finally have found a place for my really good images, while my sub-par stuff will continue to earn me consistent, substantial money on S.S. If Alamy turns into microstock, or even gets more similar to microstock, then I will be left high and dry, as I certainly am not going to ever, EVER sell my better images on a cheap Royalty Free basis. In the article that the OP (in this case, Alamy themselves) linked to, the use of the term "crowdsourcing" concerns me. My impression of Alamy is that it is a group of contributors that are all highly successful, professional photographers - just what you would expect from a high-end stock agency. Alamy's use of the term "Crowdsourcing" makes me think that they do not think of themselves as a high-end agency that only represents the world's finest photographers. Is this really the case? Crowdsourcing infers (to me, at least) that they are just representing a bunch of willy-nilly part-timers and hobby photographers. My impression when joining Alamy was that I would be partnering with an elite agency that still sells world-class images for high rates on a Rights Managed basis. Am I really just joining a bunch of hobbyists who are trying to earn "a few bucks on the side"? Do Alamy's customers think of Alamy as offering some of the world's finest imagery? Or, do they think of Alamy as just a small step above microstock? I really would like some accurate, transparent answers to these questions, as I feel that a huge part of my financial future is going to be dependent on the revenue I can generate here on Alamy. I doubt if many buyers would consider Alamy 'high end' as against Corbis or Getty....... But my understanding is that throughout the past several years, Getty and Corbis are very shoddy, low-end agencies that are basically just microstocks now. If Alamy is just as bad as Getty and Corbis, then where does one go to sell premium images for very premium prices on a RM basis? What agency is still a "good" one? Some of us really hate - and I mean HATE - selling on our own, and much prefer/need to sell via a stock agency.
  10. I certainly hope not! The reason I joined Alamy is because it is NOT a microstock agency. I already have a big, successful portfolio on a MS agency, but I needed another agency to market my better images - one that would sell for premium prices on a Rights Managed basis. I feel as though I finally have found a place for my really good images, while my sub-par stuff will continue to earn me consistent, substantial money on S.S. If Alamy turns into microstock, or even gets more similar to microstock, then I will be left high and dry, as I certainly am not going to ever, EVER sell my better images on a cheap Royalty Free basis. In the article that the OP (in this case, Alamy themselves) linked to, the use of the term "crowdsourcing" concerns me. My impression of Alamy is that it is a group of contributors that are all highly successful, professional photographers - just what you would expect from a high-end stock agency. Alamy's use of the term "Crowdsourcing" makes me think that they do not think of themselves as a high-end agency that only represents the world's finest photographers. Is this really the case? Crowdsourcing infers (to me, at least) that they are just representing a bunch of willy-nilly part-timers and hobby photographers. My impression when joining Alamy was that I would be partnering with an elite agency that still sells world-class images for high rates on a Rights Managed basis. Am I really just joining a bunch of hobbyists who are trying to earn "a few bucks on the side"? Do Alamy's customers think of Alamy as offering some of the world's finest imagery? Or, do they think of Alamy as just a small step above microstock? I really would like some accurate, transparent answers to these questions, as I feel that a huge part of my financial future is going to be dependent on the revenue I can generate here on Alamy.
  11. Thank you for your kind words, Paulette - they are appreciated. Also, thanks for the suggestion about the better keyword to use. I will implement this in the future. I did not realize that the site would have daily updates - I guess I assumed that updates would be continuous, and happen whenever someone clicked on a "submit" button. So, I will sit back and wait, as you suggest. There is one apparent glitch, though: on my "My Alamy" page, it says: 1 images not on sale - please keyword Yet, when I click on that, another page comes up in a new (big) window, it says: You have no "Not Ready" images. Please choose a different category from above. So, one page says I have one image that needs keywording, then another page says that I don't have any images that still need to be keyworded. This really looks like a contradiction to me. Are such contradictions normal here on Alamy? Do I just have to get used to some inconsistencies?
  12. That did help! Thank you, Michael ____________________________________ Ok, another issue I am having; quite the opposite of the first. I have an image that has ben all prepped - keywords done, description done, etc - everything finished. Alamy even says that the image is "ready". But I don't know how to submit it, now that it is all ready to go. I have searched the page, high and low, for a button to click on that says, "submit image". Yet I can find no such thing. maybe I am just not looking in the right place. Maybe the "submit" button is hidden in some drop-down menu somewhere (oh, how I hate drop-down menus!) Anyway, could someone help me figure out how to submit the image, now that it is ready? Thank you so much!
  13. Thank you all for your replies and helpfulness. Thank you, Philille. What you said to do I followed step-by-step, and it worked great! As for keywording, I really need to do it here in Alamy, as I do not have photo software (other than iPhoto). And my computer is really slow, and when I have tried to add powerful photo editing programs, it bogs everything down and the computer just seizes up. So, I'd better stick with just using iPhoto until I can get a new computer. ANOTHER QUESTION: When writing keywords, what do I put between each keyword? a comma? a space? a space and a comma? Also, if there are two words that I want to be recognized as being "together", such as "song bird", then how do I ensure that they will be recognized as such by the search engine, and that it will not see "song" and "bird" as two separate words?
  14. Hello, fellow contributors! I am brand new to the forum, and also brand new to Alamy.......I am so glad to be part of such a wonderful stock agency! I have a problem with one of my very first images: I don't do keywords, descriptions, or titles all at one sitting. This stuff requires a great amount of focus and concentration for me, and after a few minutes I need to pull away from it and let my head clear for a while......then I'll come back to it and do a little more, then step away again....and so on and so on and so on. So, what happens is that I might have the "manage images" page open for a couple of days, with one of the images partly done and partly undone. Now, the problem with this is that sometimes my computer or internet connection "spaces out" - it gets frozen up and I have to refresh Safari or restart my computer. When this happens, what happens to the "manage images" page is that it gets submitted - whether I was finished keywording or not. It is the same as if I had clicked on the "submit" button. I know that this should not happen, but it does. So I now have an image "for sale" on Alamy that is only partially titled, partially keyworded, and partially described. So I need to go open up that image again on the "manage images" page. Problem is, when I go to "manage images", that image is not there. In fact, the only image there is the one that I have not even started to keyword yet. So, how do I get this image back into a window that allows me to add to the keywords, title, and description? I contribute to another agency, and doing this stuff is no trouble whatsoever. At any time I can go into any of my images and change the keywords around, change the title, etc. I would hope that this is also possible here at Alamy. The keywords, title, and description that are associated to an image should always be able to be changed by the contributor at any time, right? If this is not the case, and for some reason Alamy does not allow the contributor to change these things at will, then I would like to completely remove the image from Alamy, and re-submit it as a new image, and start all over again. How do I do this? Please let me know how to do these things - any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you, Tom
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