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giphotostock

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Everything posted by giphotostock

  1. In my experience, Alamy has gaping holes in some perfectly sellable content areas. GI
  2. Not quite related to the original post, I am afraid I'd have to largely agree with the above point. Alamy is, of course, trying to do its best given the way it is set up, the material it has and the external market forces. However, numbers are numbers. I've been submitting to a certain, new to me, library for the past several months. It uses many distributors, including Alamy. Here's the count of images sold (and reported) so far by three selected distributors: Getty: 20 Corbis: 10 Alamy: 0 GI It's like comparing apples and oranges. You would have to be comparing the sam
  3. Not quite related to the original post, I am afraid I'd have to largely agree with the above point. Alamy is, of course, trying to do its best given the way it is set up, the material it has and the external market forces. However, numbers are numbers. I've been submitting to a certain, new to me, library for the past several months. It uses many distributors, including Alamy. Here's the count of images sold (and reported) so far by three selected distributors: Getty: 20 Corbis: 10 Alamy: 0 GI
  4. Having a plan helps. Come up with a shoot list or a list of specific ideas for what to shoot. Keep it as a living document: add to it when you have an idea, subtract when you get the shot, sort it into smaller shoots (by subject, location, etc), prioritize. I have one that is now several years old, devoted to editorial (textbook), at 33 pages currently, with one idea per line. Another one (kind of a subject matter subset of the first) is 6 pages long. The newest, devoted to commercial shots, is at 4 pages. I do not remember when it was the last time whenI did not know what to shoot. )
  5. That's what the editors in edited collections are for. Does Stockimo have editors to discuss edit results with? GI
  6. 2006 average net per sale: $158 .. 2010 average net per sale: $52 2011 average net per sale: $54 2012 average net per sale: $41 2013 average net per sale: $31 2014 average net per sale: $21 GI
  7. 1. Alamy: 7 times since 2007, ~$350 net, editorial 2. not Alamy: 21 times since 2010, ~$1700 net, editorial 3. commercial library: 5 times since Dec 2013 +many in between GI
  8. Subject shooter here. ~90% studio work shot for the editorial market (textbooks). The remainng ~10% is on location, with ~half of that shot for the market and the other half - "pretty" travel pictures. For the past several months had been shooting for the commercial market (and a different agency), 100% studio concepts. GI
  9. I'd say if you are going to measure success in money, you'd have to understand what market wants. The sooner the better. YMMV. GI
  10. This is a key point and a very simple one indeed. Really, the formula has been around forever: 1. Figure out what specific market you want to sell to 2. Figure out what that market needs 3. Shoot 4. Submit to an agency that supplies to #1. In a sense, it is not a rocket science. The challenge is to execute religiously on #1-4. Just my opinion. GI
  11. That's why very few get a foot in the door at the wildlife specialist agencies. They are smart enough to only accept pictures that are an addition to their collection, not the umpteenth duplicate. ... the doors to the wildlife specialist agencies are shut. Cheers, Philippe I do not have a first-hand experience with that, nor do I shoot wildlife, but from what I hear, there are gaping holes in specialists' collections. It would appear that it's very easy to get in if you have the right material. Think about the lines of "wildlife doing everyday things" - mating - fighting - cha
  12. If someone tells me I can't do something I wonder if they're entitled to say it. The Koln cathedral interiors on here are mostly unreleased. It's not unprofessional to seek to use one's images, nor to clarify a restriction, and if one pays for a permit, in my book one has paid for something valuable, viz. a licence to use the photographs lawfully. Just because there are unreleased images for sale it does not mean that they don't have the proper permission to be used commercially. Paying for a permit does not automatically grant you permission to use the images commercially. Further, you d
  13. Join a respected natural history agency and pay a close attention to what the editor would suggest. GI
  14. For editorial, subject matter is the king. Identify the subject matter that market demands. For some photographers, making images of said subject matter in the studio is more productive than taking images outside or on a location. GI
  15. At least one agency out there reports who the client is (for direct sales) but not rights granted. However, they'd tell you the latter if you ask your editor nicely. GI
  16. How good is the analysis? It seems to be largely based on microstock data, isn't it? I also got an impression that it is more like a marketing piece: have a point and cherry-pick the data and their presentation to support that point. GI
  17. This is by no means a rhetorical question... but how could you know which pictures won't sell (or, conversely, which pix will)? I take note of my sales, in choosing which subjects might be worth shooting. But, even after amassing 7,000+ pix here, I really can't guess which of my pix will sell next. A lot of my favourite pix haven't sold at all, while a few pix have sold many times An answer to that may be to specialize. The sales data would than be much easier to analyze and that can used to drive future shots. It looks like some prefer to stay generalist and some of them are successful
  18. Science Photo Library in the UK Photo Researchers and Visuals Unlimited in the US
  19. Go to the studio and do some still lifes. For me the monetary reward is 5-6 times higher than shooting outdoors, on a per-image basis. The side benefit is that you can work in the studio even when it is sunny outside. GI
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