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Robert M Estall

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Everything posted by Robert M Estall

  1. That comes as no surprise. Great minds think alike as always. I won't bother with the rest of the truism. My wife used to be a picture researcher for Readers Digest Books. One of her frustrations would be to be sent off searching images only to be told at the end "remember that shot we used back in abtzc, let's find that and use that" Happens all the time. In America, the holy grail is to get an image selected for a standard text in scholastic publishing. Chances are it will be re-ordered for updated editions for a couple of decades. I would say my collection is less than 50% repeats but it i
  2. Our first one would have been bought over here in 1961 and taken back to Canada after Dad's sabbatical year. It caused quite a lot of comments. I remember the chap who came up to me and said: Son you have four flat tyres there. Radial tyres hadn't arrived. The front seats were like a mushy armchair, very comfortable but nothing like a normal car seat. Thankfully it didn't have many problems because finding a mechanic to work on it was not easy. I was never up to speed on the model numbers but the second one had the swiveling headlights. A little more power I think. One little bolt removed and
  3. I'm glad to hear you didn't just chuck that can of beer concentrate. So much food is wasted because of a bit of nonsense on a label. My nose will tell me if anything is off. I suppose I really should take up brewing or winemaking. This house was once The Falcon a good many years ago. There were even Falcon tokens but sadly we don't have any. There was a brewery attached out the back. We still have the brick floor which makes a generous patio. Years ago there were pubs or alehouses in abundance. Now we only have two pubs open in a village of over a thousand. Mark, I just had a peek
  4. Freezing cold is NOT character building, shorts or skirts or whatever. Even Canadians don't seriously try to sell that notion. They learn how to keep warm one way or another. The Russians just drink even more vodka or so I'm told. Never been. Scots definitely wear something warm under their kilts when the snow blows
  5. 1963 was my first experience of winter in UK having spent the previous 20 or so winters in Canada. Seemed pretty normal to me except that clearing snow from narrow lanes didn't seem to work well. I know, doesn't happen often enough to re-design the whole road system. As far as I can detect, there are only two snow shovels in this village. I own both of them! For the first few years after we moved out here, it would snow and there would be the muffled footsteps past the house to the shop where the shelves would be stripped of beans and bread. Loo paper hoarding was not yet a priority
  6. Nope, you're not the culprit. It's not much of an issue, I've several shots and have never sold one specific of the village. A couple of purely generic images have sold
  7. I've had a cheeky "lesser" photographer visit my Suffolk Village who went so far as to snap my house. I say snap as he did a hastey grab at several of my neighbours at the same time. Of course it's fair game, but I doubt he has romped to the bank with his takings. I too have shot and sold that Tidemill!
  8. I too am drawn to rusty old bits of gear (the bigger the better) and knackered boats sitting sadly on the foreshore. There's a story to be told in most of these things. But unless they can be photographed with some sort of context, I fear they are not going to rise up the lottery of search engines. Alamy will let you upload them, but sales will be scarce. Hey, sales are scarce anyway!
  9. Had my flu jab Saturday morning at Hadleigh Health Centre (NHS) Very impressed how smoothly they were processing the large number of over 75s and getting them through a one-way system. In and out in about 5 minutes. I think I hardly felt a prick as they pushed the needle in. In all of those over-75s there were no hobbling old crocks!
  10. Situation doomed has been averted. Someone zoomed my 60s Carnaby st, twice in fact, so graph looks normal again. I still owe Alamy $69 though
  11. The worst thing about rolling over into a new month is that my Alamy Measures takes a dive to the very bottom of the graph and will continue to look like a ski jump until I get a zoom or two. I should be used to it by now, but it still looks like I'm doomed. I know, I should avoid even looking for the first few days of the month, but I'm hooked. The sales graph wobbles along and as long as that doesn't bottom out, I know there's not a lot to worry about. It has stopped telling me I owe Alamy $70 and to-day I only owe them $69 wheeee!
  12. I think I have posted just the once on the "images sold" thread . That thread may be a useful guide to how this thing works, but I think it unfair to expect fellow photographers to display their whole hand. Most of my portfolio goes back a good few years. 40+. I was surprised to count up how many sales for the images on my most recent page of uploads. That page covers most of the past two years' I seem to have been asleep awhile. I think it's eight in total. There are some in the lower levels but a fair number are more substantial. Long may it last!
  13. My report shows 7 sales for $565 which is fine, but the cleared funds show as minus $70. So for the moment I owe Alamy!
  14. I've got a bedside DAB and an FM in my office next door. Both are tuned invariably to BBC Radio 4 which is where we find Desert Island Disks (Cat Stevens this morning) I know they reach me a couple of seconds apart which is OK, no need to stand on the small landing between where I can neither sleep nor work. The FM in my small Camper does have an on/off button and I have to be careful to turn it off or it will drain my battery in a day or two. I usually have a spare for the times when I am in someplace remote, but hooking up the cables is a bit of a pain. I have a simple mobile whi
  15. over 95% of my portfolio are scans made on a Nikon LS9000; mostly 35mm which produce a 54 MB file, the rest from 6x7 which produce a file needing reduction in dpi. That was a £2000 scanner. The Imacon was much more expensive and could squeeze a little more detail out of the transparency but was a lot slower. The special trick of the LS9000 was a setting for kodachrome which dealt pretty well with the fringing problem. I don't know if that is a problem with using a camera to scan. There is a special place below reserved for the scoundrel at Nikon who opted to cease software support for all th
  16. As I plan to keep a viable archive even in this digital age I always do basic keywording in Photoshop adding © credit so that set of files could be a coherent source in the future. Some of the images go back 50 years and are still selling to-day. There is always the chance the images I create to-day may have a good long life. One of the photographers I used to represent had such appalling handwriting that after too many attempts to get him to help me identify some of the subjects, I just sent it all back. Good photographs but, in effect, unidentified so useless.
  17. Rights grabbing has been going on for a very long time. A publisher or packager would have a person who's job was contracts as long as I can remember. Not to be left to photographers and picture researchers over a tipple in the pub. They were never push-overs! For the most part, they took the view that I was only doing my job by holding out for best terms and it was vital to not get in any sort of temper. Terms like "in perpetuity" and "through-out the universe" started appearing twenty years ago. I'm afraid it will get worse, not better.
  18. Slippers are a serious subject if you live in a draughty old house with brick and stone floors like this place. Heavy slipper socks for fireside, damp proof for nipping out back to collect dog droppings, and something getting on for shoes to pop out the front door to buy a fish or two from the bloke who comes 'round in van on a Tuesday morning. Jane took a dislike to one pair calling them pervert's slippers. Couldn't see it myself, but they had to go. Recycling an old pair of trainers isn't the greatest look, but, if it works for you, why not? Losing a set of long loved kitchen knives would
  19. Gosh, I had completely forgotten about about those little whisker curb feelers. Haven't seen those for years
  20. Chuck, we all admire the eye watering standard level of compensation in the US ( as long as you have registered the copyright) I assume you always go for the full amount in order to protect the ruling. You used to have a fairly high standard figure for lost transparencies back in the days of film. The UK usual figure was £400 and I never settled for less but pointed out that they were getting off lightly compared to US. Unfortunately that doesn't apply in these digital days; I used to do a nice trade in that area. Good records were the key!
  21. Simon Croft knows his stuff all right, but there a few things first: Do you have any history of charging clients for the kind of use your infringer has made? You can't just pick a figure out of the air. Before you make any approach, take screen grabs so your infringer can't just delete and pretend it never happened.. Is your infringer in the same country as you? If you are in Spain and your infringer is in UK he is likely to consider it unlikely an action originating in Spain is going to gain much traction. So, yes, they are likely to ignore you. There are some photographers who have become pr
  22. Many years ago I sported big long bushy sideboards and flares. I don't think it was ever a good look and I'm sure I had left it too late. Hands up another never viewer of the Kardashian show' No, I don't think I will be tempted by catch-up or re-run TV. I quite like some buskers but they are a rarity in Sudbury which is my nearest town
  23. It used to be possible to make a living out of stock photography though most professional photographers looked to make more of our income from assignments and the stock was likely to be what filled in the quieter times and build up a collection for some future revenue. That worked pretty well up until, maybe ten years ago. Habits die hard or perhaps we just like to keep our hand in. Maintaining this crumbling pile and garden can fill a lot of time before I succumb to daytime television. So far I've made 59 sales for 2020 which is still a little better than pin money but let's not kid ourselves
  24. I don't think Jim ever made much from photography, but sold advice well. As far as he was concerned there was only America which works for some but is a pretty limited view
  25. I remember my early days in Canada when the shops had not a lot to offer and we didn't have a lot of cash for "fancy stuff" But Canada does go for seriously strong and aged cheddar. Mother was a terrific hoarder and she would save the dried up corners of cheddar (which didn't seem to go mouldy) These were grated finely and that's what we used instead of parmesan. These were post war years and we had to make do as best we could.
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