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ernest

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About ernest

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Alamy

  • Alamy URL
    https://www.alamy.com/contrib-browse.asp?cid={DF5A8FBF-B7B6-4A84-A7C7-6AAE690C1617}&name=Franck+METOIS
  • Images
    2477
  • Joined Alamy
    03 May 2011

Recent Profile Visitors

484 profile views
  1. Asking about the future of stock photography to stock contributors is a silly question !? Hard to understand...After all, if the question is silly, DON'T ANSWER unless you are silly yourself.
  2. Since some months, I see a clear price decrease of the images. Do you see any reason ( even a slight one) to hope this tendency will be reversed ? Myself, I think there will be no turning back.
  3. Many contributors are not native english speakers, they are not fluent in english so they remain silent. But surely they disapprove the new split. Who likes losing money ?
  4. What's the highest sale you ever made with Alamy ? In my case, I sold a photo for 250 US$ in march 2017. Editorial, simple photo of a buddhist rock painting in northern Pakistan ( Lowest sale : 1,25 US$ !)
  5. It's seems this club is open only to contributors from UK and USA !
  6. E3WCG1 More walking, more cycling. Slow travel and patience.
  7. Stock photography and environmentalism, is it really incompatible ? Or may be there is a possible way to behave as an ecofriendly stock photographer ?
  8. Looking for inspiration ( in terms of travel photography) ? Check the collection of Alamy contributors like Pascal Mannaerts, Eric Lafforgue, Frans Lanting, Leonid Plotkin,...
  9. Anyone knows what is the skin problem of these two men. At the left, the father.
  10. Have bought a used D700 in the nearest photo shop. 850 euros, 12 000 clicks. I'm always astonished by people who sell such good cameras while they are almost new.
  11. Yes, MO means MB ( megabit) not MP ( megapixel). Thanks to those who like my collection. To fotoDogue, I started this discussion after seeing your photos. I was reading another thread and you were there, writing about the Nikon D3300. Indeed, my camera ( Nikon D700) broke down some times ago. So I'm looking for a new Nikon body. D700 is good stuff unfortunately there is one drawback, photos are not really heavy ( 34 MB).So D3300 is good choice ? I'm looking for something not too expensive, something you take photos more heavy than 34 MB.
  12. While browsing on Alamy, I see photos weighing 60 MO, 70. How is it possible ? With which camera ? Is it useful to have such heavy photos if it's only for stock ?
  13. Jeff, "embroiled" was not the proper word ( I'm not a native english speaker so...). Except one time, I was not arguing with local people. Some local people who were on my side did it, not me. The other times, I was reported to the police. Whether they went directly to the police or they first met me, asking directly "Show me your ID" and then going to the police as I refused to show it and left them. An Indian thinker said what you say, what you say when you talk about someone else speaks volumes about yourself, not about the person you are talking about. ( The thinker is Jiddu Krishnamurti.) I think this is right. This is right when you say something, but also when you do something. These problems happened not because of me but because of the local people. Well OK its because of me AND the local people. Both. Anywhere else I had never seen such behaviours, when local people report you to the police only because you are a visitor and you are taking photos.( Except one time many years ago when I was in the eastern part of Pakistan near the Indian border. But it was a time when tensions were high between the two countries,... and the feelings of paranoia were high also.) I think the Ethiopian problems are due to the survival of tribal culture. In the past, tribespeople lived on their own territory where people belonging to other tribes were not allowed or had to prove who they were, why they were there. Traditionally minded people still behave this way. Because local people don't know english and I don't know any Ethiopian languages, the "best" way to answer these questions is to report to the police. Another reason is fear of thieves, spying also ( yes yes it seems ridiculous but yes !). Also foolishness and lack of openness to the modern world. They are not accustomed to see foreigners, especially foreigners who take photos so they are suspicious. These are three reasons to explain the difficulties I faced. Another reason could have been racism ( not in such cases). In black Africa, some persons don't like white people because of the color of their skin. It is a fact. To conclude, most of the incidents happened in the same region, the region that was hit by the famine in 1984-1985. The famine was due to drought ( The Agow people I was talking in the first post have left their villages for the same reason. Drought is prevalent in this part of the country.) and also lack of political will to help the affected persons. Because the people of this region were fighting the central power, they were the most vindictive among all the Ethiopians. When you read guidebooks, the local people of this region are called "independent". You think " this is very nice, they are independent, they are free". It means also they want to rule their territory their own way, they want to control anything happens on their territory.
  14. Some days ago, I came back from a three months trip in Ethiopia. It was my third journey in this country but this time was the best ( in terms of photo production) and the worst ( in terms of dirty tricks). As I had already seen the tourist destinations of the country, I had chosen to take the road less travelled, to visit places where tourists don't go. Good idea ? Not sure. As an independent traveller who takes photographs, I attracted the suspicion of the local people. Three times, I have been embroiled with local people and ended up in police stations for checking ( passport, visa) and questioning ( why are you here ? why do you take photos ? why aren't you where other tourists are ?...). The worst time was the second time when I was betrayed by my own guide, Hagos the bastard ( a asshole who is working in the tourism sector !!!). Because he was not pleased I was taking pictures of a particular community the local people despise. ( The local community involved is called the Agow or Agaw or Agew. You can see the photos on Alamy). All these setbacks happened when I was visiting one particular region ( the eastern Highlands) but I remember it also happened one time during a previous trip in central Ethiopia. Wherever in the country, the "informers" were both men or women, illiterate villagers or educated civil servants, young or old. So while travelling in Ethiopia, who can you trust ? Nobody, even your own guide... Has anyone of you already experienced such difficulties in Ethiopia, Africa or elsewhere ?
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