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MDM

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Everything posted by MDM

  1. No idea if there's an ideal MP amount for stock shooting. I guess the bigger the better, from a commercial point of view. But I do believe there are limits concerning judging images at pixel level. Wouldn't it be fairer if QC judges all images at the same size - lets say 12 mp? (in other words, QC should temporarily do the downsizing of large images prior to checking the quality). Now it's comparing apples, not with oranges, but with melons. When dealing with different resolution sensors you have to downscale the larger sensor to make a meaningful comparison. It only frustrates photographe
  2. I find that coniferous trees often do not look properly sharp when viewed at 100%. I think it is something to do with the way they reflect light although I don't have any science with which to back this idea up. Sometimes it can be very slight wind blow but, even when it is quite still and an appropriate shutter speed is used, conifers can look a bit fuzzy. Downsizing can help - sharpening is not permitted by Alamy although saying this risks opening that old can of worms again.
  3. Agree about the book and I would also strongly recommend the Martin Evening Lightroom book. I have the LR4 book which is absolutely excellent so presume that the LR5 version is equally good.
  4. As Gervais says, the first thing to think about is your computer and if it can handle the new software. If you have a reasonably fast computer with a decent amount of RAM and a good graphics card, then it is definitely worth considering the Photoshop CC - Lightroom package. There have been massive performance changes in Photoshop over the years, particularly in the last few versions, aside from numerous changes and enhancements since CS2 which is now quite ancient. You don't need to be doing complex compositing to benefit from Photoshop over Lightroom - e.g. I prefer Photoshop for spotting a
  5. He certainly won't need to upsize but downsizing might just be what is needed if the full size images are unsharp when viewed at 100%. What appears out of focus at full size may just snap into focus at smaller sizes. It is essential to use very good lenses and be very careful with focusing on the D800. I would recommend viewing individual images in Photoshop if available and downsizing according to requirements rather than using Lightroom export. This is simply for greater control and speed of checking images, particularly with PSCS6 or CC, as the graphics are much faster than Lightroom on the
  6. Would that be the five minute argument, or... Oh, never mind. Alan I have to admit I did think of that but I didn't think Mirco would understand. I could be wrong but I don't think Monty Python would translate too well into Czech or Polish.
  7. Adios Mirco. You know where to come if you ever need a good argument . Best of luck with the baby - a wonderful experience.
  8. Just what the Alamy forum needs - a football hijack thread - as if it wasn't peaceful enough already ! Never heard of Mackems before - the things I learn on here. Is the picture a symbolic premonition of Mackems fate next May then?
  9. I doubt we need to anything for Alamy or anybody else for existing direct debits or credits. I have heard nothing about this in the UK, so, if the UK banks are going to implement these changes, my assumption is that it will all be transparent and automatic to the end user. Many people wouldn't even know what an IBAN is in any case. If it was an issue, it should be all over the banks' websites - I see nothing on a quick look at a few banks. The IBAN is easily derived from the existing account number although each bank seems to have a different system - for example, it might contain the sort co
  10. Simplest way is to find the image you want to add in a new window - the full size one, not the thumbnail - and simply drag and drop it in the text box here - voilá Industrial landscape at sunset, Cambridgeshire Sunset from Montañon Negro, Gran Canaria, looking towards Tenerife Los Cristianos, Tenerife, at sunset, with the island of La Gomera in background
  11. Unless you are intending to travel and process on the road, I would say you are a lot better sticking with iMac. You will pay quite a bit more for a MacBook Pro with equivalent processing power and you will have a much smaller screen unless you get an external monitor. I've not checked prices but you could probably get a 27 inch iMac for the price of a 15 inch MacBook Pro. The laptop is less upgradeable as well - RAM tends to be very expensive, for example. Eye strain is another potential problem with a small screen in addition to the other ergonomic issues mentioned earlier. From what I
  12. Point taken and I don't disagree. I did qualify my post by "taking the posts on this forum as representative" and I would say that you are exceptional (that is meant as a compliment) on this forum. As far as I can see, most people are doing very straightforward photography with the minimum amount of post-processing, mostly in Lightroom. I agree with NielsVK as well in that the worst thing about using laptops is the ergonomics. If one is spending a lot of time on a computer, then a laptop is not ideal for health reasons.
  13. Not quite the whole story for GPUs. There's a fundamental issue with laptop GPUs (same for iMac GPUs) in that they don't have the greatest cooling systems. If you try and run CUDA enabled software for rendering, the GPUs will often overheat and crash the computer...or worse. For a top-end GPU, needed much more these days with software enabled GPU computing, you need not only a desktop but often one which is designed for gaming as it has better chasis cooling. I use a large Nvidia GPU for CUDA core rendering and had to get an extra auxillary fan in to keep the temperature of the GPU within
  14. OK. Apart from the border you might want to take a look at Lightroom's abilities with inserting copyright notices and watermarks, especially if you decide to watermark your pictures at any point. Lightroom makes it easier than Photoshop for inserting a watermark in many cases. EDIT Just to add, the Lightroom stuff is done after you finish with the file in Photoshop, not in the initial processing of the raw. I just export copies of the final image (which for me is a PSD). So, for example, I'll export a full-res JPEG for Alamy and a watermarked low-res copy for my website. An advantage is L
  15. Actions are not saved as text files so I don't think you can do what you are asking. It seems like a very roundabout way to tackle the problem anyway although it's not evident from the info you give how you are inserting the text in any case. One way is to create a text layer in another file which is added to each image and then flattened using an action. However, I recall that you use Lightroom so why not export using a preset with a watermark. This is what I do now - I used to embed a text layer with an action but the Lightroom option is much simpler.
  16. Cheers Phil. There are great roadside views towards Tenerife on the LP-130 just outside of Los Canarios and, if you feel like a bit of exercise, there are amazing views of the the other islands from the top of Teneguía volcano in the same area.
  17. Very late entries here, hope I'm not too late - all of Teide Volcano from various places. Teide is one of the most potentially violent and dangerous volcanoes on European territory but it's been peaceful for a while now and it looks at its most peaceful at dawn and dusk. From Gran Canaria From La Palma From Tenerife
  18. Let's call it objectivity. Actually ethnic categorisations are quite a fascinating subject - unscientific and vague for the most part and almost impossible to agree on. Good Christmas forum fodder. Sorry, I was being my usual obtuse self. I was referring to your use of "WOP" and its (ironic given the current thread) derogatory connotations for a certain group of Southern Europeans. Wiki entry here. I agree that ethnic categorisation (along with language) is fascinating. Of course historically, anthropological research was driven by the desperate need to prove the inherent supremacy of
  19. The Wikipedia article has two versions of this - one with the Irish fighting against the Mexicans and the other deserting and fighting for the Mexicans.
  20. Let's call it objectivity. Actually ethnic categorisations are quite a fascinating subject - unscientific and vague for the most part and almost impossible to agree on. Good Christmas forum fodder. Sorry, I was being my usual obtuse self. I was referring to your use of "WOP" and its (ironic given the current thread) derogatory connotations for a certain group of Southern Europeans. Wiki entry here. I agree that ethnic categorisation (along with language) is fascinating. Of course historically, anthropological research was driven by the desperate need to prove the inherent supr
  21. That's another thing. If you belong to an ethnic minority, you can use a term which is generally considered derogatory to describe yourself but it is taboo for others to use the term. There are many examples of this. On the second point,I have found that is true - Chileans consider themselves to be American in the broadest sense - gringos (I love that word) are often distinguished as Norte Americanos (even if they're European). I've spent a lot of time in Mexico, where Americans, Canadians, Europeans, and even Australians are usually called gringos. Interesting, because a popular exp
  22. Let's call it objectivity. Actually ethnic categorisations are quite a fascinating subject - unscientific and vague for the most part and almost impossible to agree on. Good Christmas forum fodder. Sorry, I was being my usual obtuse self. I was referring to your use of "WOP" and its (ironic given the current thread) derogatory connotations for a certain group of Southern Europeans. Wiki entry here. I agree that ethnic categorisation (along with language) is fascinating. Of course historically, anthropological research was driven by the desperate need to prove the inherent supr
  23. That's another thing. If you belong to an ethnic minority, you can use a term which is generally considered derogatory to describe yourself but it is taboo for others to use the term. There are many examples of this. On the second point,I have found that is true - Chileans consider themselves to be American in the broadest sense - gringos (I love that word) are often distinguished as Norte Americanos (even if they're European). I've spent a lot of time in Mexico, where Americans, Canadians, Europeans, and even Australians are usually called gringos. Interesting, because a popular exp
  24. Let's call it objectivity. Actually ethnic categorisations are quite a fascinating subject - unscientific and vague for the most part and almost impossible to agree on. Good Christmas forum fodder. Sorry, I was being my usual obtuse self. I was referring to your use of "WOP" and its (ironic given the current thread) derogatory connotations for a certain group of Southern Europeans. Wiki entry here. I agree that ethnic categorisation (along with language) is fascinating. Of course historically, anthropological research was driven by the desperate need to prove the inherent supr
  25. That's another thing. If you belong to an ethnic minority, you can use a term which is generally considered derogatory to describe yourself but it is taboo for others to use the term. There are many examples of this. On the second point,I have found that is true - Chileans consider themselves to be American in the broadest sense - gringos (I love that word) are often distinguished as Norte Americanos (even if they're European).
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