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The crap that has just come off my sensor, I only cleaned it a couple of months ago!

how do I know, live news image, wanted a fast shutter speed so left the aperture to do its thing. uploaded. Got home had a look at image:

aperture f22! spots the size of seagulls :lol:

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From the title, I thought maybe there had been a papal election.

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You do your own cleaning of the sensor then ?

What method / device do you recommend ?

 

Geoff

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I use wet clean Digipads. Although with SLT I hardly ever have to.

Edited by spacecadet

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20 hours ago, Bill Kuta said:

From the title, I thought maybe there had been a papal election.

 

B)

 

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On 1/26/2018 at 18:49, mickfly said:

 

Nice little post there, but why would you think that mirrorless cameras don't have issues with sensor dust? The only difference is they don't have mirrors, and mirror, if anything, will provide additional barrier protecting the sensor. Or am I missing something?

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44 minutes ago, Pietrach said:

 

Nice little post there, but why would you think that mirrorless cameras don't have issues with sensor dust? The only difference is they don't have mirrors, and mirror, if anything, will provide additional barrier protecting the sensor. Or am I missing something?

 

One would think so but many of the issues of "dust" on sensors of dslrs can be down to the splashes of  lubrication, and from wear, of moving parts in the mirror box. The mirror probably provides little protection as its flapping probably keeps disturbing dust from elsewhere that ends up on the sensor. Nikon had problems on one model (D600/610?) that put sticky marks (lubrication splashes?) on the sensor, didn't they recall it or at least provide a free or low-cost cleaning/repair service?

 

Mirrorless only have the shutter as a moving part. But they will get dust on the sensor but better access should make it easier to clean.

 

The biggest problem I have had with mirrorless dust was from marks on the rear cover glass on the 18-55mm Fuji X lens. With the greater depth of field finger marks showed as shadows on the image!  When I mentioned it here some years ago David Kilpatrick said that he had had similar problems with marks on the rear element of wide angle lenses (and possibly even on the front element as I recall) showing on the image.

Edited by Martin P Wilson

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7 minutes ago, Martin P Wilson said:

 

One would think so but many of the issues of "dust" on sensors of dslrs can be down to the splashes of  lubrication, and from wear, of moving parts in the mirror box. The mirror probably provides little protection as its flapping probably keeps disturbing dust from elsewhere that ends up on the sensor. Nikon had problems on one model (D600/610?) that put sticky marks (lubrication splashes?) on the sensor, didn't they recall it or at least provide a free or low-cost cleaning/repair service?

 

Mirrorless only have the shutter as a moving part. But they will get dust on the sensor but better access should make it easier to clean.

 

The biggest problem I had with mirrorless dust was from marks on the rear cover glass on the 18-55mm Fuji X lens. With the greater depth of field finger marks showed as shadows on the image!  When I mentioned it some years ago David Kilpatrick said that he had had similar problems with marks on the rear element of wide angle lenses (and possibly even on the front element as I recall) showing on the image.

 

One can always learn something here :) Great post. Thanks.

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We are programmed to take great care in ensuring a clean lens element and changing lenses but one of the biggest culprits of dust is the crud that gathers in the rear lens cap and transfers to the rear lens element. This in turn will transfer to the sensor more so on open face mirrorless cameras. I now carry a small rocket type blower bulb and blow out both rear cap and lens at every change. From a previous monthly wet clean I have not cleaned a sensor for some two years. 

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37 minutes ago, ReeRay said:

We are programmed to take great care in ensuring a clean lens element and changing lenses but one of the biggest culprits of dust is the crud that gathers in the rear lens cap and transfers to the rear lens element. This in turn will transfer to the sensor more so on open face mirrorless cameras. I now carry a small rocket type blower bulb and blow out both rear cap and lens at every change. From a previous monthly wet clean I have not cleaned a sensor for some two years. 

 

I do the same but I still get some dust most noticeable using f22 (as the OP said) on a plain blue sky and adding some hefty contrast to the image. This article on the Fixation website has some good tips for minimising dust including using a blower on the back of the lens and lens cap. They also mention sticky tabs which you can put in the rear lens cap to gather dust. I've not tried it (yet).

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Fixation are offering sticky tabs at £5 for 10.

 

My solution, double sided sticky tape. Cut a bit off the roll the size needed for the inside of the cap. Roll will be cheaper and last for yonks in the long run.

 

Allan

 

 

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2 hours ago, Pietrach said:

 

Nice little post there, but why would you think that mirrorless cameras don't have issues with sensor dust? The only difference is they don't have mirrors, and mirror, if anything, will provide additional barrier protecting the sensor. Or am I missing something?

Thanks Pietrach, you're right, but I meant the compact non-DSLR's like the Sony RX series with non-interchangeable lenses. I'll edit the post to make it clearer.

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2 hours ago, Pietrach said:

 

Nice little post there, but why would you think that mirrorless cameras don't have issues with sensor dust? The only difference is they don't have mirrors, and mirror, if anything, will provide additional barrier protecting the sensor. Or am I missing something?

No, you're not. I'm still with a Sony SLT. Very little dust gets past the pellicle. Certainly much better than the previous SLR.

I now wet clean the sensor about once a year whether it needs it or not. Just kidding. If the dust isn't in the top half of the frame, and it tends not to be for some reason, I leave it alone.

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49 minutes ago, mickfly said:

Thanks Pietrach, you're right, but I meant the compact non-DSLR's like the Sony RX series with non-interchangeable lenses. I'll edit the post to make it clearer.

 

I had a Sony DSC R1 bridge camera and I expected no dust. But very early on a huge lump of crud appeared on the sensor and because it was sealed I thought it would be going back under warranty. But later the same day the blob, it was huge - I could see it in the electronic viewfinder, disappeared and never reappeared. I should have got it cleaned while it was in warranty though, there was no telling when it might have reappeared; but I was lucky.

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