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Just a warning...I had always thought that car number plates should be obscured, and have done this in the past.  Just had a submission failure partly for `noticeable retouching'.

 

 

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I don't blur them myself- if a publisher wants to do it he can do. And yes, I have had sales with readable plates.

Edited by spacecadet

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I've scratched my head over this too. I started  to move the numbers around once in PS, but then realized I may be creating someone else's number.  :wacko:

 

Now I just click that I don't have a property release and move on. 

 

yellow-taxicab-blurred-to-show-movement-

 

I can't read that plate number, can you? 

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Hope I don't get into trouble for taking this number plate photo  ..

 

licence-plate-on-a-nypd-new-york-police-

 

 

Edited by AlbertSnapper
grammar
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2 hours ago, Barking said:

Just a warning...I had always thought that car number plates should be obscured, and have done this in the past.  Just had a submission failure partly for `noticeable retouching'.

 

 

 

Was it a Live News shot - where nothing can be altered?  If not it surprises me. I've blurred out number plates where the incident could be embarrassing for the owner, including a shot of my caravan in a ditch!  Never had a problem before.

 

 

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I never blur license plate numbers because I fear what happened to the OP.

 

Is having visible number plates really that big a deal with RM images?

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Here in New York, and probably all the other states as well, license plates are government property. When you dispose of the vehicle you're supposed to return them. Unless you have a contact in law enforcement there's no easy way to connect them to the owner. By the same token, a property release signed by the owner wouldn't be valid because they're not his or her property.If they're on public property it shouldn't be an issue. 

 

On the other hand, I've read that in some European countries license plates are the property of the owner are are easily traceable, so it may be different there. Even so, if it's on public property I would doubt the owner would have any expectation of privacy.

 

 

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Thanks, Stacy -- that's very interesting and useful information. 

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No not live news...though thinking about it now, it probably should have been as it's a rare occurrence over here!!!

 

No property sign offs, so purely editorial

 

This was a shot of an electric car being charged...failure stated 'noise' and 'noticeable retouching'.  The only retouching was to the number plate.  Shot on a sunny isles day ISO 200 1/640... Couldn't see much 'noise' myself...must have been a bad day 😁

 

I'll move on

Edited by Barking

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Here in BC (don't know about other Canadian provinces) plate numbers are only traceable to their owners by the police, not by the public. You also have to turn in old plates -- even personalized ones -- when taking your vehicle off the road (e.g. selling it), so I guess the license plates remain the property of the provincial government.

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There's also the question of authenticity. If the license plate has been blurred then what else might've been digitally altered? More and more buyers are moving away from obviously photoshopped images. CVS, a major Pharmaceutical and Beauty Aids chain in the US, just announced this week they'll no longer be using "photoshopped" images on their house brand products. If the client doesn't want to include the plate number  then let them remove it themselves.

 

Unless you're creating a space for a client to insert their own text, I feel it looks amateurish, but that's just my personal opinion.

Edited by fotoDogue

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Another point - Some people use a special filter over their plates to avoid detection by red light and speed cameras. Of course that's illegal.

Blurring the number might give the impression the driver is using one of these when, in reality, he's not.

Edited by fotoDogue

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Do you blur people's (strangers) faces before uploading them? I would have thought a person would be more likely to get upset at seeing themselves in a picture than their car number plate. So if you consider it important to blur number plates then maybe you should be blurring people?

 

The way I see it, a number plates is property and you can get a release to sell the image commercially or you can not get a release and so can ticket the 'Editorial Only' box and sell for editorial purposes (in the UK at least). But worth noting, that a number plate is normally attached to a car, lorry or the likes and a property release would likely also be required from the manufacturer to sell such an image commercially.

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10 hours ago, Matt Ashmore said:

Do you blur people's (strangers) faces before uploading them? I would have thought a person would be more likely to get upset at seeing themselves in a picture than their car number plate. So if you consider it important to blur number plates then maybe you should be blurring people?

 

 

I have (exceptionally) been known to do that, took a shot of a Crown Court building and there was a likely looking person in the frame. Blurred the face out. I think it has sold, would need to check. My number plate blurring only occurs in special circumstances, I've done it a few times and for different reasons, but not as a general rule.  I know for sure that some of these instances have sold.

 

 

Edited by Bryan

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1 hour ago, Bryan said:

I have (exceptionally) been known to do that, took a shot of a Crown Court building and there was a likely looking person in the frame. Blurred the face out. I think it has sold, would need to check. My number plate blurring only occurs in special circumstances, I've done it a few times and for different reasons, but not as a general rule.  I know for sure that some of these instances have sold.

 

 

 

If I want blurry, all I have to do is take off my glasses (a.k.a. "specs"). :D

 

That said, the only time I use blurring is to sometimes add a little extra motion blur in PP if I think it might not be obvious enough in the preview. QC seems fine with this.

 

 

Edited by John Mitchell

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detail-of-a-cadillac-lasalle-club-clc-re

 

 

Right after reading this post yesterday I went out and found this restored Caddy Eldorado 1970 (?) on my street.  Have I got the model and year right? 

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23 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

detail-of-a-cadillac-lasalle-club-clc-re

 

 

Right after reading this post yesterday I went out and found this restored Caddy Eldorado 1970 (?) on my street.  Have I got the model and year right? 

 

Think I might still have one of those in the garage. I'll run and check...

 

Seriously, whatever were American car manufacturers thinking when they designed those monsters.

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1 hour ago, John Mitchell said:

 

Think I might still have one of those in the garage. I'll run and check...

 

Seriously, whatever were American car manufacturers thinking when they designed those monsters.

 

 

Gas was cheap and nobody really thought about the environment. Buying a new car every year or two was a status symbol. 

It was part of the "American Dream."

 

My in-laws had a Cadillac convertible. Maybe pink? Riding around in a car like that was certainly different.

Edited by fotoDogue

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48 minutes ago, fotoDogue said:

 

 

Gas was cheap and nobody really thought about the environment. Buying a new car every year or two was a status symbol. 

It was part of the "American Dream."

 

My in-laws had a Cadillac convertible. Maybe pink? Riding around in a car like that was certainly different.

 

Exactly. Cheap gas fed the monster habit. I remember my father buying a small Renault 8 back in 1965 when I was a teenager in rural Quebec. It was technologically far ahead of the big American cars most of our neighbours drove. The Renault actually had headrests and seat belts (lap type). With its rear-mounted engine, the Renault also handled snow and ice better than the big guys, which had all their weight over the front wheels. 

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On 1/25/2018 at 15:12, Barking said:

Just a warning...I had always thought that car number plates should be obscured, and have done this in the past.  Just had a submission failure partly for `noticeable retouching'.

 

 

I always thought that you shouldn't show number plates, but I guess not, or was your touching really noticeable?

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In the UK all an individual can do with a number plate is find out whether the vehicle was taxed and MoT tested the day the photogrpah was taken and whether the plate has been cloned. Certainly nothing about the current owner. So no, I don't obscure it, or worry about not doing it.

Were there to be an identifiable driver elsewhere than at a rally I might reconsider.

Edited by spacecadet

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