Betty LaRue

Tags Brit style vs American

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

 

Because the US is a young country settled by people mainly from the UK and Europe, the food and language varies a lot.

 

One or two Irish made it as well and not to forget the odd African here and there.

 

 

2 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

You're welcome, Bryan.

 

It makes sense that the British use those French names, because that was were the veggies came from in earlier days. Why we say zucchini, I don't know. (Italians say zucchine with an 'E'.) 

 

I think it might also have something to with the fact that a very significant proportion of English vocabulary comes from French - those Normans did get around a bit. American English has more of an Italian and Spanish influence (maybe).

Edited by MDM

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

 

elderly-couple-with-shopping-KDCAPR.jpg

 

The appliance (another tag) the gent is using does not look like the usual walker and I wanter to differentiate. However I must add "walker" and "wheeled walker" to the tags.

Thanks for picking this up Betty.

 

I agree with Betty that we do not think about adding derivatives or "Foreign English" words enough. Will start adding "gas" etc etc to my images too and pinch some US sales.:P

 

Allan

 

 

 

Isn't that one a type of "rollator"?

Edited by John Mitchell

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15 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

I understand you all are pretty nice. That’s what counts most with me. And fiercely loyal, you lot. :)

 

:) You, too, Betty! :)

Just to clarify: my comment about lack of understanding was referring to humanity in general - despite our supposed interconnection with the Internet/social media. :(

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I've just looked it up and it seems that Tri-walker isn't a brand name, it seems to be generally used for a three-wheel walker.

Apparently it can also be called a rollator, even in the UK (never heard that term used, but that just means Mum's was sold as a 'tri-walker').

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27 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

 

Isn't that one a type of "rollator"?

 

You got it. Thanks John.

 

Allan

 

 

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Ta? What does that mean??? Oh, you mean "tar" or pitch! (Just kidding.) 

 

Here's one (or two) they missed in that translation guide: popsicle in America, and ice lolly in the UK. 

 

 

del-monte-orange-iced-lolly-C3MYN4.jpg

 

Martin Lee's photo

 

What I miss from my time in the UK is phrases like "Pull the other one; it's got bells on it." 

 

Edo

 

 

Edited by Ed Rooney

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7 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

What I miss from my time in the UK is phrases like "Pull the other one; it's got bells on it." 

 

Edo

 

 

Why not try using them yourself? You probably won't get shot much.

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32 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

Why not try using them yourself? You probably won't get shot much.

 

With a smile on his face.:)

 

Allan

 

 

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2 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

Here's one (or two) they missed in that translation guide: popsicle in America, and ice lolly in the UK. 

Edo

 

 

 

It's a popsicle in Canada as well. Here sugary beverages -- Coca Cola, Pepsi, etc. -- are usually called "soft drinks" or "pop" rather than "sodas," which is the term I usually hear in the USA. Can't remember what name is used in the UK, even though I lived there for awhile as a kid. 

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3 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

 

It's a popsicle in Canada as well. Here sugary beverages -- Coca Cola, Pepsi, etc. -- are usually called "soft drinks" or "pop" rather than "sodas," which is the term I usually hear in the USA. Can't remember what name is used in the UK, even though I lived there for awhile as a kid. 

Definitely not soda or pop. Probably soft drink, or fizzy drink. Unless it is Irn Bru of course, in which case, it’s “made from girders” :)

i realise that most people won’t have a clue what I am talking about. So here’s a video.

 

Edited by Sally
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"It's a popsicle in Canada as well." 

 

That's why I said America and not the USA, John.

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22 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

"It's a popsicle in Canada as well." 

 

That's why I said America and not the USA, John.

 

I'm with you there. For me, "America" stretches all the way from Nunavut (where they don't need popsicles) to Tierra del Fuego. B)

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The popcicle I grew up with was one with two attached sections. Each column had its own stick. It was easy to pull (break) apart and share. You got a single column with a stick and gave the other half to a friend if you wanted to share.

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1 hour ago, Betty LaRue said:

The popcicle I grew up with was one with two attached sections. Each column had its own stick. It was easy to pull (break) apart and share. You got a single column with a stick and gave the other half to a friend if you wanted to share.

 

That's right. I remember them well. Boys were not so big on sharing as girls, though. 

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Nunavut? Isn't that the Inuit name for popsicle? :wacko:

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As it turns out, candy, sweets, popsicle and ice lolly are all one that list of 100 I posted as a link.  Parla italiano? 

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2 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

Nunavut? Isn't that the Inuit name for popsicle? :wacko:

 

Probably. I used to like Eskimo Pies as well, but they're politically incorrect now.

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Also grew up saying, “May I have a bottle of pop?”

Grapette and chocolate pop were my favorites. I lived on a farm for 18 months. The town had one caution light, and a combo old-fashioned store, gas pump and post office. Remember the hoses cars ran over that dinged?

The pop cooler was a deep box that sat outside by the door. The bottles of pop were in a couple of feet of iced water with clear chunked ice. I dipped my arm in, fished around, pulled up a bottle over and over until I found what I wanted. 

By then, my arm was painful and deep red. Any sweat on your face disappeared because the icy blood in your arm circulated through your body and cooled you all over.

Wow,  was that pop cold on a hot summer day!

That little farming community was 50-75 years behind its time. One room schoolhouse with a water pump, one ladle everyone shared germs from, pot bellied stove for heat and outhouses. 13 kids grade 1 through 8, (some grades didn’t have a kid) one teacher that we called, “Teacher” and we loved him.

I lived “Little House on the Prairie” for two school terms. If you acted up, you were sat on a stool with your nose in the corner. Big kids helped little kids with their schoolwork.

 

I loved it. I was 7 & 8 years old. Third and fourth grades. I was put through from first to third, skipping 2nd.

Then we moved to a modern town with modern schools. :(

Betty

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21 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

 

It's a popsicle in Canada as well. Here sugary beverages -- Coca Cola, Pepsi, etc. -- are usually called "soft drinks" or "pop" rather than "sodas," which is the term I usually hear in the USA. Can't remember what name is used in the UK, even though I lived there for awhile as a kid. 

 

Soft drinks in the UK as opposed to alcoholic drinks.

 

Allan

 

 

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On 1/13/2018 at 14:37, John Mitchell said:

 

I Here sugary beverages -- Coca Cola, Pepsi, etc. -- are usually called "soft drinks" or "pop" rather than "sodas," which is the term I usually hear in the USA. Can't remember what name is used in the UK, even though I lived there for awhile as a kid. 

 

 

It's regional. Here in the Northeast portion of the US we say Soda. Pop seems to be used more in the Midwest. Others call it soda pop. When I was in Western New York State, which is more like the Midwest, everyone called it Pop. I remember reading an article about what "regular coffee" means in different parts of the US. In some places it means black coffee. In other areas it's coffee with milk and sugar, while other places it's coffee with milk or cream. Of course the more we travel and use the internet these regional differences are becoming less obvious.

 

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/12/soda-vs-pop_n_2103764.html

Edited by fotoDogue

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All this talk of bygone times reminds me that I used to hear my relatives (oop north i.e. the north of England), on occasion talk of a 'dollar' in terms of local currency. I think they referred to it as being equivalent to about 8 shillings (40p today). I am guessing that it was because that was the accepted exchange rate for a us dollar at the time and that the exchange rate was fairly steady for a good period. 

 

Does anyone else from the north of England (and of a certain age!) recall this? 

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