Betty LaRue

Tags Brit style vs American

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9 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

That looks similar to Allen’s, but his is a 3-wheeler. He calls it a wheeled support trolly. 

Over here, I never hear anyone refer to them as anything but “walker”, not distinguishing with or without wheels. Although for tagging, one should distinguish.

I looked mine up, and guess what? I don’t have a single image of anyone using a walker. 

But I do have shopping carts, which you call shopping trollies. Do you spell “trollys” or “trollies”? Or trolley/trolleys?

 

Trolley/trollies

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Hey Betty, 

 

my my brother lives over in New Jersey and a couple of common differences I pick up when he talks to me theses days are

 

cell phone as opposed to mobile

countertop as opposed to kitchen worktop

round trip as opposed to a return

and asking for waatter instead of water. It’s the one word we say that we find the Americans really struggle with when we visit.

 

BTW, my mother law has a walking frame and she refers to it as her walker or trolly.

 

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There also called A frame walkers 

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5 hours ago, Bryan said:

 

The lady who looks after allotment next to mine is of Scottish descent, and tells me that the Scots term for a veg plot is (or maybe was) the Kaleyard.

But spelled 'kailyard', I think, or 'kailyaird' if you want to be a purist and stick to Lallans - probably not many picture researchers think in Scots dialect, though

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I had a friend who called a walker a gazebo because of the way they look. I don't advise using that in keywords.

 

Paulette

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At least we don't have to deal with US/UK pronunciation, we'd have to figuring out correct spellings for tomayto and tomahto too.

:lol:

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Posted (edited)

American Rutabaga

British Turnip

Cornish Swede.

 

Wait till you get to cuts of meat, or joints as the Brits call them Lol.

Edited by Shergar

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18 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

As I peeked at Allen Bell’s latest images, (I like) I realized, although this has been discussed before, I’m under-utilizing tags. 

For instance, Allen has a senior couple, one using what we call in the US, a walker. He calls it a support trolly.

I have gas (gasoline) stations, he has petrol stations. I do use the tag, “fuel”. But not petrol.

 

I think our brains just seem to come up with the tags used in our own venue, and it takes religious concentration to remember to add the ones across the pond. I’m not doing other countries, thankyouverymuch.

Now to revisit images and steal some sales from you Brits. :D

Betty

 

 

elderly-couple-with-shopping-KDCAPR.jpg

 

The appliance (another tag) the gent is using does not look like the usual walker and I wanter to differentiate. However I must add "walker" and "wheeled walker" to the tags.

Thanks for picking this up Betty.

 

I agree with Betty that we do not think about adding derivatives or "Foreign English" words enough. Will start adding "gas" etc etc to my images too and pinch some US sales.:P

 

Allan

 

 

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14 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

 

 

elderly-couple-with-shopping-KDCAPR.jpg

 

The appliance (another tag) the gent is using does not look like the usual walker and I wanter to differentiate. However I must add "walker" and "wheeled walker" to the tags.

Thanks for picking this up Betty.

 

I agree with Betty that we do not think about adding derivatives or "Foreign English" words enough. Will start adding "gas" etc etc to my images too and pinch some US sales.:P

 

Allan

 

 

 

This is an interesting discussion... some good points!

I think it''s quite a usable picture for any kind of story about transport and provision for the elderly or social care.

 

Heading into 'how spammy' to be with tags debate, I personally would be a lot more spammy on this image. I would add:

 

old people

old person

walk

walking

pedestrian

pedestrians

footpath

pavement

sidewalk  (back to covering the bases by including the American word!)

pensioner (you have 'pensioners' already but I'd include the singular too)

togetherness

companions

companionship

walking aid

outside

outdoors

wearing winter clothing

wearing coats

wearing jackets

slow

walking slowly

old age

old aged

senior citizens

residential area

 

.. just my thoughts!

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4 hours ago, Steve Hyde said:

Hey Betty, 

 

my my brother lives over in New Jersey and a couple of common differences I pick up when he talks to me theses days are

 

cell phone as opposed to mobile

countertop as opposed to kitchen worktop

round trip as opposed to a return

and asking for waatter instead of water. It’s the one word we say that we find the Americans really struggle with when we visit.

 

BTW, my mother law has a walking frame and she refers to it as her walker or trolly.

 

Oh, well, New Jersey. That’s a country (region) into itself.  The rest of the country doesn’t say waatter. 

There is definite regional pronunciation across the US.

I worked with a woman from Wisconsin. One day she said something about her gooms. (rhymed with rooms) I said, “Your what?” She pointed to her mouth. I laughed sooo hard.

She said, “what do you call them?” I said, “gums.” (Rhymes with hums, dumbs, etc)

She laughed at me.

And where I would say, “want to go with me?” She would say, “want to go with?”

Because the US is a young country settled by people mainly from the UK and Europe, the food and language varies a lot. Wisconsin and Minnesota, for instance, has a lot of people of Swedish decent.  Heavy on Italian around New York, New Jersey. Although that area is a mixing pot.  French decent around Louisiana. Florida....Cuban.  And it goes on. 

They all bring their way of speaking English and their food culture.

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Posted (edited)

You're welcome, Bryan.

 

It makes sense that the British use those French names, because that was were the veggies came from in earlier days. Why we say zucchini, I don't know. (Italians say zucchine with an 'E'.) 

Edited by Ed Rooney

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4 hours ago, Alex Ramsay said:

But spelled 'kailyard', I think, or 'kailyaird' if you want to be a purist and stick to Lallans - probably not many picture researchers think in Scots dialect, though

 

I stand corrected!  

 

Coincidentally I was doing a crossword on the bus this afternoon and the only clue I couldn't get was something about Burns country 20, and the answer turned out to be Lallans! Never heard of the word before today!

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3 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

You're welcome, Bryan.

 

It makes sense that the British use those French names, because that was were the veggies came from in earlier days. Why we say zucchini, I don't know. (Italians say zucchine with an 'E'.) 

 

The variety of courgette I sow is called Zucchini - never thought about the connection previously. They don't all grow like this.....

 

a-pair-of-conjoined-courgettes-variety-z

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20 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

As I peeked at Allen Bell’s latest images, (I like) I realized, although this has been discussed before, I’m under-utilizing tags. 

 

 

Does it go without saying that everyone knows who Allen Bell is? :unsure:

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53 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

Yes, I’m always spelling it wrong.  Sorry Allan. :(

I’ll bet that’s not the first time someone has got it wrong. The usual spelling over here is Alan, Allen. I need to remember Allan is unique!

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Posted (edited)
4 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

Yes, I’m always spelling it wrong.  Sorry Allan. :(

I’ll bet that’s not the first time someone has got it wrong. The usual spelling over here is Alan, Allen. I need to remember Allan is unique!

 

 

:lol::lol::lol:

 

Allan

 

FAME at last.;)

 

ITMA

 

 

Edited by Allan Bell

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, andremichel said:

 

Does it go without saying that everyone knows who Allen Bell is? :unsure:

 

Andy when you decide to come along to the Cambridge meet up you will probably meet me there.

 

Send your email to  abell@clickcommerce.co.uk  and I will notify you when our next meeting is. Assuming you cannot make the 17 Jan as per my other thread.

 

Allan

 

 

Edited by Allan Bell
typo

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6 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Andy when you decide to come along to the Cambridge meet up you will probably meet me there.

 

Send you email to  abell@clickcommerce.co.uk  and I will notify you when our next meeting is. Assuming you cannot make the 17 Jan as per my other thread.

 

Allan

 

 

 

 

1 hour ago, andremichel said:

 

Does it go without saying that everyone knows who Allen Bell is? :unsure:

 Just go up to the man with the copy of the Daily Mirror and say "you are Chalkie White and I claim my five pounds."

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5 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

 

 

 Just go up to the man with the copy of the Daily Mirror and say "you are Chalkie White and I claim my five pounds."

 

:D:D:D

 

Allan

 

 

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3 hours ago, Matt Ashmore said:

 

This is an interesting discussion... some good points!

I think it''s quite a usable picture for any kind of story about transport and provision for the elderly or social care.

 

Heading into 'how spammy' to be with tags debate, I personally would be a lot more spammy on this image. I would add:

 

old people

old person

walk

walking

pedestrian

pedestrians

footpath

pavement

sidewalk  (back to covering the bases by including the American word!)

pensioner (you have 'pensioners' already but I'd include the singular too)

togetherness

companions

companionship

walking aid

outside

outdoors

wearing winter clothing

wearing coats

wearing jackets

slow

walking slowly

old age

old aged

senior citizens

residential area

 

.. just my thoughts!

 

Thank you Matt. Hope you don't mind but as you offered the above tags I am going to use some if not all.;)

 

Allan

 

 

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8 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Thank you Matt. Hope you don't mind but as you offered the above tags I am going to use some if not all.;)

 

Allan

 

 

 

No problem.. just pleased to be able to help!

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