Betty LaRue

Tags Brit style vs American

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As I peeked at Allen Bell’s latest images, (I like) I realized, although this has been discussed before, I’m under-utilizing tags. 

For instance, Allen has a senior couple, one using what we call in the US, a walker. He calls it a support trolly.

I have gas (gasoline) stations, he has petrol stations. I do use the tag, “fuel”. But not petrol.

 

I think our brains just seem to come up with the tags used in our own venue, and it takes religious concentration to remember to add the ones across the pond. I’m not doing other countries, thankyouverymuch.

Now to revisit images and steal some sales from you Brits. :D

Betty

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I'm technically a Brit and I've never heard 'support trolley'. My Mum has one and it's called a Tri-Walker, which might be a trade name, I think they're generically 'walkers'. So I wouldn't have thought of 'support trolley' either!

I try to remember to use Americanisms, but there must be many I don't know.

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Checked Alamy measures AoA for the past year and didn't see any searches for "support trolley." Quite a few for "walker," but they are probably looking for this kind of walker:

 

woman-walking-her-dog-along-a-gravel-pat

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I've always tried to include both British and American spellings and euphemisms when keywording, although I'm sure I have forgotten some. Can't be perfect all the time. :D

 

Jill

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Support walker would be the first term to cross my mind, not  support trolley being used before but it seems legit.

 

I tend not to worry too much about Americanising my keywords. I reckon if someone is searching for 'sidewalk', they are unlikely to want my photo of a pavement in Bolton.

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Posted (edited)

Are we talking about a zimmer frame? 

 

Not that I always hit the nail on the  head - but sometimes it can be turned to an advantage not being a native speaker of English.

Edited by Niels Quist
  • Upvote 1

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10 minutes ago, Niels Quist said:

Are we talking about a zimmer frame? 

 

Not that I always hit the nail on the  head - but sometimes it can be turned to an advantage not being a native speaker of English.

Yes, but with wheels, I think.

  • Upvote 1

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Posted (edited)

I might be wrong, but I suspect that British people have a slight advantage over American people just because I suspect we get to watch more American TV than the other way around! :D

 

I try to use words and spellings from both sides of the Atlantic. This includes spelling with 'z's and 's's. Including a 'u' in some words an not.

The real killer for me is when describing something with lots of bright colours (like a rainbow) ... and end up with:

 

colour

color

colourful

colorful

colours

colors

multicolour

multicolor

multicoloured

multicolored

multicolours

multicolors

Edited by Matt Ashmore

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3 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

For instance, Allen has a senior couple, one using what we call in the US, a walker. He calls it a support trolly.

 

Do you mean a zimmerframe on wheels? 

They are quite fashionable in Germany where they go by the name of rollator. And I found that the English translation was a walking frame. 

And then I came across this one. You'll find many more meanings in this article.

https://www.verywell.com/rollator-or-walker-2318324

 

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That looks similar to Allen’s, but his is a 3-wheeler. He calls it a wheeled support trolly. 

Over here, I never hear anyone refer to them as anything but “walker”, not distinguishing with or without wheels. Although for tagging, one should distinguish.

I looked mine up, and guess what? I don’t have a single image of anyone using a walker. 

But I do have shopping carts, which you call shopping trollies. Do you spell “trollys” or “trollies”? Or trolley/trolleys?

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The United States and Great Britain are two countries separated by a common language.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Joseph Clemson said:

Support walker would be the first term to cross my mind, not  support trolley being used before but it seems legit.

 

I tend not to worry too much about Americanising my keywords. I reckon if someone is searching for 'sidewalk', they are unlikely to want my photo of a pavement in Bolton.

 

That's the way that I'm increasingly looking at it. You can add as many cross-pond tags and references as you like, but a buyer in NYC searching for an automobile parked on the sidewalk is very unlikely to want to see a Ford Transit on the pavement in Milton Keynes.

 

Having said that, it's good to be aware of words which have become or are becoming used more across cultures. American  terms for things which used to be unknown in the UK are used more frequently these days as the old terms are used less and less (chemists is used far less in the UK now, in favour of pharmacy - though I still say chemists, if only to annoy my daughter!) Hasn't that always been the case?! Not just one-way traffic, though. The nature of world connectivity these days mean that cultures are more aware of each other than ever before. A shame that this hasn't led to an increase in mutual understanding, though! 

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Posted (edited)

I have a similar problem with Scottish versus English words. I have to put both if it’s something in Scotland, but it’s unlikley those words would be known/used by anyone else.

eg

kirkyard churchyard

doocot dovecot

 

I draw the line at using messages for shopping.

Edited by Sally

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In Australia we call them walking frames - with or without wheels. Several pics under search for walking frames. Don't know if listed by Australians.

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Wow, that’s amazing so many different terms for that device! What, at least 10 tags for it? Then....if you add plurals...

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Yeah, walking frames would do too.

 

And AFAIK we use trolley/trolleys.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks to this thread, I've now added about ten new keywords / phrases to my one and only image that contains a walker, walking frame, support walker, rollator, etc. It has now gone from orange to green.

Edited by John Mitchell
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1 hour ago, John Mitchell said:

Thanks to this thread, I've now added about ten new keywords / phrases to my one and only image that contains a walker, walking frame, support walker, rollator, etc. It has now gone from orange to green.

:D:lol:

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3 hours ago, losdemas said:

 

That's the way that I'm increasingly looking at it. You can add as many cross-pond tags and references as you like, but a buyer in NYC searching for an automobile parked on the sidewalk is very unlikely to want to see a Ford Transit on the pavement in Milton Keynes.

 

Having said that, it's good to be aware of words which have become or are becoming used more across cultures. American  terms for things which used to be unknown in the UK are used more frequently these days as the old terms are used less and less (chemists is used far less in the UK now, in favour of pharmacy - though I still say chemists, if only to annoy my daughter!) Hasn't that always been the case?! Not just one-way traffic, though. The nature of world connectivity these days mean that cultures are more aware of each other than ever before. A shame that this hasn't led to an increase in mutual understanding, though! 

I understand you all are pretty nice. That’s what counts most with me. And fiercely loyal, you lot. :)

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Here you go, Betty:  https://www.boredpanda.com/british-american-english-differences-language/

 

And I'll toss in a few of these for you to use:  u u u u u u u

 

Having lived on both sides of the Pond, I speak both forms of English. In theory that is. Most people watch films and TV often enough to know the basics of each. Slang is hard, but buyers don't use a lot of slang when doing a search. 

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Bookmarked it.  Now, reminder of the other thread, if I can remember that I bookmarked it.

Thanks, Edo

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, spacecadet said:

Yes, but with wheels, I think.

In Australia, the walkers with wheels are called Wheelie Walkers. Trust me on this - Mum's in a nursing home...everyone has one.

Edited by cbimages

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Posted (edited)

This is curious.  British use the French for these veg, while Americans use Italian for one. Maybe we shouldn't worry about our English. And I think both Brits and Yanks might use French beans or Kenya beans, depending on the actual green bean.  :unsure:

 

british-american-english-differences-lan

Edited by Ed Rooney

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Sally said:

I have a similar problem with Scottish versus English words. I have to put both if it’s something in Scotland, but it’s unlikley those words would be known/used by anyone else.

eg

kirkyard churchyard

doocot dovecot

 

 

 

The lady who looks after allotment next to mine is of Scottish descent, and tells me that the Scots term for a veg plot is (or maybe was) the Kaleyard.

Edited by Bryan

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1 hour ago, Ed Rooney said:

This is curious.  British use the French for these veg, while Americans use Italian for one. Maybe we shouldn't worry about our English. And I think both Brits and Yanks might use French beans or Kenya beans, depending on the actual green bean.  :unsure:

 

 

Thanks Edo, just added Eggplant as a tag!

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