Robert

New Year, New Lens

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4 minutes ago, Dave Nelson said:

 

That doesn't look like the Mountain Ash tree and berries that we have up here.  The tree is fuller,  the berries are more pink than the red/orange color that we have, plus they are growing more individually from the branches, as opposed to in bunches.

 

I just uploaded a shot of our berries - should have it on line tomorrow if not sooner. 

 

 

Two images for the ROWAN tree from the UK.

 

rowan-tree-in-berry-in-winter-BXWBNG.jpg

 

 

rowan-berries-by-flashlight-DF8G0X.jpg

 

 

Allan

 

 

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Just collected my new Sony 50mm f1.8 lens. No time to plat with it now but will try it out tomorrow.

 

Allan

 

 

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No new lens, but I have bought the ability to use my collection of Canon EOS lenses on my Sony a6500 with a Commlite adapter.

 

Whether or not I would consider lugging my rather nice Canon 24-105 f4 L around, rather than three small film era primes, is debatable, but I would like to be able to make use of my 100-300 Sigma f4 . I'll do some tests, and see how they all do, just need some sunshine.....    Please!

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No new lens but I have the new Nikon D850 on its way....been using the D700's forever (in digital years) and thought it was time for an upgrade.  The decision was made, in part, when I sent one of my D700's to be repaired and Nikon said they would repair it but will end servicing this model in the near future.  I have to say, I really loved using the D700 :( .  The next thing is to get a much more powerful computer to handle the much bigger files.

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1 hour ago, Betty LaRue said:

 

Here is the berry tree.  It was very windy that day so the whole tree berries are blurry, but you see the tree form.

Then a closeup of the wrinkled berries.

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/5ol2swb1pr4bn42/_ALI2390-berry tree.jpg?dl=0

https://www.dropbox.com/s/d9zhiv958dd7gvl/_ALI2392-berry closeup.jpg?dl=0

Check out Sorbus hupehensis, Betty.  It has pink berries and is hardy enough for Oklahoma.  We grow 'Pink Pagoda' over here.

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1 hour ago, Betty LaRue said:

 

Edited by John Richmond
Added in error - faster than system!!

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59 minutes ago, Michael Ventura said:

No new lens but I have the new Nikon D850 on its way....been using the D700's forever (in digital years) and thought it was time for an upgrade.  The decision was made, in part, when I sent one of my D700's to be repaired and Nikon said they would repair it but will end servicing this model in the near future.  I have to say, I really loved using the D700 :( .  The next thing is to get a much more powerful computer to handle the much bigger files.

 

And maybe a few new lenses as well if you are going straight from 12 to 45.7 MP. But don't look back -  the D850 is the ultimate imaging machine. And you can still shoot small high quality NEFs if you want.

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1 hour ago, Michael Ventura said:

No new lens but I have the new Nikon D850 on its way....been using the D700's forever (in digital years) and thought it was time for an upgrade.  The decision was made, in part, when I sent one of my D700's to be repaired and Nikon said they would repair it but will end servicing this model in the near future.  I have to say, I really loved using the D700 :( .  The next thing is to get a much more powerful computer to handle the much bigger files.

 

That's interesting. I picked up a second hand model last week for just over €400. A year ago I'd have been paying twice as much. Maybe the combination of the new model and Nikon's decision may have something to do with the lower price.

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1 hour ago, John Richmond said:

Check out Sorbus hupehensis, Betty.  It has pink berries and is hardy enough for Oklahoma.  We grow 'Pink Pagoda' over here.

I will, John, thanks!

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2 hours ago, Michael Ventura said:

No new lens but I have the new Nikon D850 on its way....been using the D700's forever (in digital years) and thought it was time for an upgrade.  The decision was made, in part, when I sent one of my D700's to be repaired and Nikon said they would repair it but will end servicing this model in the near future.  I have to say, I really loved using the D700 :( .  The next thing is to get a much more powerful computer to handle the much bigger files.

 

I like the fact that you've made the decision to buy the D850. I can't make up my mind between the D850, D810 or a used Nikkor 500 f4. There can be only one as they say in Highlander. :) Let me know how you fair with the large files.

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1 hour ago, Sultanpepa said:

 

I like the fact that you've made the decision to buy the D850. I can't make up my mind between the D850, D810 or a used Nikkor 500 f4. There can be only one as they say in Highlander. :) Let me know how you fair with the large files.

 

I think you need to decide what you want from a camera. The D850 has everything that the D810 has in terms of astounding image quality but with even higher MP count (if that is desirable or not) so is an amazing camera for landscapes, architecture, portraiture, flowers - in other words slow considered photography with or without a tripod. But it also has a lot of features associated with the really high end Nikons such as excellent autofocus system, fast frame rate, big buffer and so on so it is also made for fast action - wildlife, sport etc. In other words, it does just about everything. High ISO ability is out of this world in terms of noise although the D810 is no slouch in that department either. Both have amazing dynamic range. Needless to say, excellent lenses are required for either camera. 

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1 hour ago, MDM said:

 

I think you need to decide what you want from a camera. The D850 has everything that the D810 has in terms of astounding image quality but with even higher MP count (if that is desirable or not) so is an amazing camera for landscapes, architecture, portraiture, flowers - in other words slow considered photography with or without a tripod. But it also has a lot of features associated with the really high end Nikons such as excellent autofocus system, fast frame rate, big buffer and so on so it is also made for fast action - wildlife, sport etc. In other words, it does just about everything. High ISO ability is out of this world in terms of noise although the D810 is no slouch in that department either. Both have amazing dynamic range. Needless to say, excellent lenses are required for either camera. 

 

I'm notorious amongst friends for being snail paced at buying stuff. It stems from me needing to be certain about a purchase. I had convinced myself that I didn't need such large files but I also see photographers like Chuck (the original one :) ) swear by their D810's. I do have good lenses for my full frame D610 but an interest in birds may tempt me to purchase the 500 mm Nikkor with maybe a 1.4 TC. Choices choices eh? I'm aware of all the pros and cons of each but I still can't make my mind up. Doh! :rolleyes: If the gods are smiling maybe I'll win the lotto and buy them all. 

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20 minutes ago, Sultanpepa said:

 

I'm notorious amongst friends for being snail paced at buying stuff. It stems from me needing to be certain about a purchase. I had convinced myself that I didn't need such large files but I also see photographers like Chuck (the original one :) ) swear by their D810's. I do have good lenses for my full frame D610 but an interest in birds may tempt me to purchase the 500 mm Nikkor with maybe a 1.4 TC. Choices choices eh? I'm aware of all the pros and cons of each but I still can't make my mind up. Doh! :rolleyes: If the gods are smiling maybe I'll win the lotto and buy them all. 

 

I have the D800e and do not use it and plan to sell it, mostly because of the slow AF and terrible buffer.  Not sure how the D810 is with those issues but I have read that the D850 has corrected those problems and I love that I can still shoot NEFs in lower resolutions, if needed.  Can not do that with the D800e.  My lenses should be good with D850 since they are the higher end glass with a fixed 2.8 wide aperture or wider with the prime lenses.  I learned a long time ago to not get cheaper glass, just not worth the savings.  I think with just shooting stock, you can get away with it but my income is still primarily commissioned work for magazines and businesses.  

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8 hours ago, Sultanpepa said:

 

I'm notorious amongst friends for being snail paced at buying stuff. It stems from me needing to be certain about a purchase. I had convinced myself that I didn't need such large files but I also see photographers like Chuck (the original one :) ) swear by their D810's. I do have good lenses for my full frame D610 but an interest in birds may tempt me to purchase the 500 mm Nikkor with maybe a 1.4 TC. Choices choices eh? I'm aware of all the pros and cons of each but I still can't make my mind up. Doh! :rolleyes: If the gods are smiling maybe I'll win the lotto and buy them all. 

 

I do recall having a similar conversation with you about the D810 a year or two back so I can see you do take your time :). I'm more of a leaper although I do read the reviews. Well it's been discussed before but I'm betting you would do far better simply in terms of image quality with either camera and a shorter telephoto with serious cropping than a D610 with a long telephoto and a teleconverter. 

 

But if you are serious about birds, then it's a no-brainer - it has to be the D850. The autofocus is incredibly fast and the detail is astounding. Now I don't shoot birds ever but I was out testing the camera when these flocking pigeons flew around over my head. Nothing remarkable you say until I tell you it was taken at the wideangle end (29mm) of a 24-70 zoom at 20-30 metres I guess and it was point and shoot - I didn't have time to focus on anything but the camera found a pigeon to focus on instantly and shot a burst all of which were in focus. As I said above it is a camera that does just about everything and does it really well.

 

 

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7 hours ago, Michael Ventura said:

 

I have the D800e and do not use it and plan to sell it, mostly because of the slow AF and terrible buffer.  Not sure how the D810 is with those issues but I have read that the D850 has corrected those problems and I love that I can still shoot NEFs in lower resolutions, if needed.  Can not do that with the D800e.  My lenses should be good with D850 since they are the higher end glass with a fixed 2.8 wide aperture or wider with the prime lenses.  I learned a long time ago to not get cheaper glass, just not worth the savings.  I think with just shooting stock, you can get away with it but my income is still primarily commissioned work for magazines and businesses.  

 

I think you will be very happy. You will also need an XQD card to max out the speed. The older SD cards really slow things down. The smaller NEF options allow for very prolonged bursts and the image quality is excellent. The smaller NEFs are 12-bit rather than 14-bit at full size but I haven't noticed any difference although I haven't done serious testing as yet.

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On 1/10/2018 at 13:21, John Richmond said:

Check out Sorbus hupehensis, Betty.  It has pink berries and is hardy enough for Oklahoma.  We grow 'Pink Pagoda' over here.

I think that’s it, John. They are sold in Oklahoma nurseries, and useful/ornamental for parks and public spaces. This one was found planted near a marina and lake. Thoughtfully placed.

Betty

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33 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

I think that’s it, John. They are sold in Oklahoma nurseries, and useful/ornamental for parks and public spaces. This one was found planted near a marina and lake. Thoughtfully placed.

Betty

Ours are a bit lot younger than the one you've shot.  Looking forward to that quantity of berry display.

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2 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

I think that’s it, John. They are sold in Oklahoma nurseries, and useful/ornamental for parks and public spaces. This one was found planted near a marina and lake. Thoughtfully placed.

Betty

I'm not sure it's in the Sorbus genus.  Look at how the berries are growing - individually from the branches as opposed to in bunches, like the ones in Allan's images above.  The Mountain Ash and other members of that genus all seem to have berries in bunches.  I'm still looking for something with berries growing individually from the branches...

 

(Probably should have started a separate thread for this.)

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1 hour ago, Dave Nelson said:

I'm not sure it's in the Sorbus genus.  Look at how the berries are growing - individually from the branches as opposed to in bunches, like the ones in Allan's images above.  The Mountain Ash and other members of that genus all seem to have berries in bunches.  I'm still looking for something with berries growing individually from the branches...

 

(Probably should have started a separate thread for this.)

 

1 hour ago, Dave Nelson said:

I'm not sure it's in the Sorbus genus.  Look at how the berries are growing - individually from the branches as opposed to in bunches, like the ones in Allan's images above.  The Mountain Ash and other members of that genus all seem to have berries in bunches.  I'm still looking for something with berries growing individually from the branches...

 

(Probably should have started a separate thread for this.)

I see what you mean. I didn’t notice the bunches, individual berry growth. I’m still interested in your thoughts, Dave. This tree is very hard to pin down.

Edited by Betty LaRue
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49 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

 

I see what you mean. I didn’t notice the bunches, individual berry growth. I’m still interested in your thoughts, Dave. This tree is very hard to pin down.

Guess I was wrong - I found this page that seems to show exactly what you have - looks like John was correct.  
The image of the berries half way down the page indicate the same growth pattern as in your image.

 

http://www.gardenaction.co.uk/trees/rowan-mountain-ash/sorbus-hupehensis.asp

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Done deal.  Thank you, John and Dave.  I’ll for sure visit that tree again as it flowers, leafs out, and produces berries.

I never found a nursery that showed the tree as well as you found, Dave. And I spent hours researching.

Betty

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4 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

Done deal.  Thank you, John and Dave.  I’ll for sure visit that tree again as it flowers, leafs out, and produces berries.

I never found a nursery that showed the tree as well as you found, Dave. And I spent hours researching.

Betty

One point for you Betty.  The correct latin binomial is now Sorbus pseudohupehensis though a lot of nurseries / garden centres will still sell it as S. hupehensis.  I'd certainly add both as tags.  These are the berries of 'Pink Pagoda' in our arboretum.

 

pink-berry-laden-autumn-branch-of-the-chinese-rowan-sorbus-pseudohupehensis-H4RCY3.jpg

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Interesting thread and many thanks to all for finding the name of a bush I remember photographing in our village back in 2014. Never could find out what it was but you have found the answer thank you.

 

pink-berries-in-autumn-ECN128.jpg

 

Sorbus hupehensis Rosea

 

Allan

 

 

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John, your picture is perfect. Even down to the reddish or pinkish color of the twigs the berries are on. Yes, Allan, this has been an interesting thread. I feel like we are a bunch of detectives who have just solved a big case. :D John and Dave being the big chiefs, you and I the underlings!  Now you have a name for yours, too.

 

John, you have the education, experience and background to do what you do.  People like Allan and I have the wants, but stumble around in the dark spending waaay to much time on one or two measly images! Funny, though. Finding the names become a burr under my saddle, a challenge, and I don’t give up easily.

You and Dave have also invested of your time and it’s greatly appreciated. Always.

Betty

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