Brasilnut

Favourite pics uploaded Dec 2017

Recommended Posts

4 hours ago, Brasilnut said:

I'll kick this off with a panorama stitched together of the San Siro Stadium in Milan.

 

I've put together a short tutorial in my blog on how I created this neat panorama using Lightroom.

 

san-siro-in-milan-italy-is-a-football-soccer-stadium-capacity-80018-KKFDNN.jpg

 

Nice shot, but I would re-process it for a moment and level it before uploading.

 

wim

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, wiskerke said:

 

Nice shot, but I would re-process it for a moment and level it before uploading.

 

wim

agree its a nice shot, reprocessing may become tricky as the overhanging red thingies (how are these called in English?) may get cropped. 

They are already a bit close to the edges. 
 

8 hours ago, Brasilnut said:

I'll kick this off with a panorama stitched together of the San Siro Stadium in Milan.

I've put together a short tutorial in my blog on how I created this neat panorama using Lightroom.

looking at the tutorial out of interest to see the original shots and steps. (just to do some smartarsing now ;) ) :

Two additional shots one further to the left and one further to the right on the very bottom of the stitch could have helped - and maybe also additional sky as you mentioned. 

First to keep these red thingies in the final crop after levelling but also the solitaire car and the empty space in front of the stadium, which for my taste does add interest. 

 

I have not done any stitches yet, and made a note to self to take additional shots. 

Edited by hdh
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great tips above, thanks. 

 

I also had an interesting advice next time to take vertical shots instead of horizontal when proposing to stitch them in order to cover more space and avoid issues I outlined in my blog post. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Brasilnut said:

Great tips above, thanks. 

 

I also had an interesting advice next time to take vertical shots instead of horizontal when proposing to stitch them in order to cover more space and avoid issues I outlined in my blog post. 

 

Also was told to move the plane of the sensor behind the axis of rotation - which is a function of the distance of the subject from the axis, its actual size and the sensor size. 

That has so far kept me away from doing panoramas - I rather get out my wi(l)de(st) angle lens ;). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Brasilnut said:

I'll kick this off with a panorama stitched together of the San Siro Stadium in Milan.

 

I've put together a short tutorial in my blog on how I created this neat panorama using Lightroom.

 

 

 

 

1 hour ago, Brasilnut said:

Great tips above, thanks. 

 

I also had an interesting advice next time to take vertical shots instead of horizontal when proposing to stitch them in order to cover more space and avoid issues I outlined in my blog post. 

 

You do seem to have jumped the gun producing a tutorial without apparently having much experience of doing panoramas in Lightroom. As well as shooting vertical (can be a bit back breaking bending over the tripod but usually worth it for this type of scene), you seem to have neglected the Boundary Warp feature which could probably have saved you some work filling in sky areas. You have used Auto transform which is really totally hit and miss (mostly miss in my experience) so not only you have a wonky horizontal but you also have some verticals that could be very easily corrected manually. Enable Profile Corrections can't work on panoramas - it can only work properly on single shots - think about it. And finally the cylindrical projection often works better than Spherical (maybe, maybe not).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, hdh said:

 

Also was told to move the plane of the sensor behind the axis of rotation - which is a function of the distance of the subject from the axis, its actual size and the sensor size. 

That has so far kept me away from doing panoramas - I rather get out my wi(l)de(st) angle lens ;). 

 

A few comments. Firstly, you don't have to produce scientifically accurate panoramas to benefit from merging images. Using a 50mm prime instead of a wide angle can have some serious benefits, especially shooting on a high MP camera as I know you do. For one thing, you can get a high quality 50mm prime for an awful lot less money than an equivalent wide angle nd if you go ultra wide then you will never match the quality of a 50. Also, shooting in mountainous areas like I do quite a lot, using a wide angle can turn mountains into hills and hills into hillocks. Merging shots from a 50 (or even longer) can solve this issue very well.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

A few comments. Firstly, you don't have to produce scientifically accurate panoramas to benefit from merging images. Using a 50mm prime instead of a wide angle can have some serious benefits, especially shooting on a high MP camera as I know you do. For one thing, you can get a high quality 50mm prime for an awful lot less money than an equivalent wide angle nd if you go ultra wide then you will never match the quality of a 50. Also, shooting in mountainous areas like I do quite a lot, using a wide angle can turn mountains into hills and hills into hillocks. Merging shots from a 50 (or even longer) can solve this issue very well.

 

 

Good tips, thanks. Stitching is new to me, didn't mean to come across as some sort of expert on it...just a little blog post for fun. 

 

I have a 50mm f1.8. Use it often for portrait, but never thought about it for this type of stuff. Will try it next time!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back on topic - I've been out at night recently

 

This one is a two shot horizontal panorama  - Santa Cruz de Tenerife

 

night-photo-looking-along-avenida-la-con

 

 

And this is just a crop of a single image with panoramic proportion also Santa Cruz de Tenerife

 

night-photo-looking-along-avenida-maritima-santa-cruz-de-tenerife-KKBHJ7.jpg

 

 

 

 

And this one is also a two shot horizontal pan - the Tyne Bridge in Newcastle doesn't really bend like this - call it artistic licence or blame Lightroom

 

night-photo-looking-along-the-river-tyne-towards-tyne-bridge-and-gateshead-KKBHNH.jpg

 

 

 

Edited by MDM
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Brasilnut said:

 

Good tips, thanks. Stitching is new to me, didn't mean to come across as some sort of expert on it...just a little blog post for fun. 

 

I have a 50mm f1.8. Use it often for portrait, but never thought about it for this type of stuff. Will try it next time!

 

OK. I think when you write a tutorial it implies some sort of expertise. I do recommend using a 50 for a lot of pans. Even the cheap ones are usually high quality optics, very sharp with minimal distortion. I know the Nikkor 1.8 is a killer lens in terms of sharpness. Oh the ones above were taken with a 24-70 zoom at the wide end. Probably accounts for the distortion on the Tyne Bridge shot :)

Edited by MDM
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was at this car show in Germany yesterday and came across all those models posing next to cars. Thought I'd done a timewarp to the 1970s ... 

 

essen-germany-1-december-2017-the-2017-e

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, hdh said:

 

move the plane of the sensor behind the axis of rotation

 

This addresses 99% of life's problems IMO...

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, MDM said:

 

A few comments. Firstly, you don't have to produce scientifically accurate panoramas to benefit from merging images. Using a 50mm prime instead of a wide angle can have some serious benefits, especially shooting on a high MP camera as I know you do. For one thing, you can get a high quality 50mm prime for an awful lot less money than an equivalent wide angle nd if you go ultra wide then you will never match the quality of a 50. Also, shooting in mountainous areas like I do quite a lot, using a wide angle can turn mountains into hills and hills into hillocks. Merging shots from a 50 (or even longer) can solve this issue very well.

yep, see the point, specially ultra wide angle lenses turning mountains into molehills and also softer than a quality 50 prime.  

Ultra wide though give a unique perspective, mainly exaggerating depth, that using a 50 or longer one would not get. 

 

Will definitely try to do a panorama some point in time, thanks for your tutorial!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, John Morrison said:

Three ways of harnessing the wind...

 

offshore-windfarm-kite-surfer-and-sand-y

 

 

 

Where is the centre of rotation in relation to the axis of the sensor?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can't stand the heat....

 

woman-cooking-catalonian-food-newcastle-

 

Newcastle Xmas market.

Edited by Bryan
  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Christmas lights on an old fig tree, Cairns

 

christmas-illuminations-on-an-old-figtre

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/2/2017 at 12:23, hdh said:

 

Also was told to move the plane of the sensor behind the axis of rotation - which is a function of the distance of the subject from the axis, its actual size and the sensor size. 

That has so far kept me away from doing panoramas - I rather get out my wi(l)de(st) angle lens ;). 

 

What on earth did you just say?  :P  My head still hurts from trying to figure that out.  I do the same as you @hdh, I use the widest angle lens I can find.  :-)  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite so far.  This is an old abandoned cotton gin and mill along a small creek in Prattville, Alabama.

 

prattville-alabama-mill-and-dam-on-autau

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Female Monkey-faced Jumping Spider (Mopsus mormon) about to feed on one of her babies.

KM99HE.jpg

 

Female Monkey-faced Jumping Spider (Mopsus mormon) with huge moth prey

KM99KG.jpg

Yellow-bellied Sunbird (Nectarinia jugularis)

KM99M5.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now