GS-Images

Image identification

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Anyone recognize this flower? From a roadside tree here on Gran Canaria. I cycle

or run past the tree most mornings and any car parked under the tree is covered in them.

The flowers are yellow as they open on the tree.

 

http://www.alamy.com/image-details-popup.asp?&n=NaN&imageid={A95A25CF-DCF7-42EA-9532-C1A48734A6D6}

 

Thanks.

 

Joe

 

Edited by Joe

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14 hours ago, GS-Images said:

Thanks for the suggestions Paulette and geogphotos. She's in a cycle lane next to the pavement, where that other cyclist in the background should probably be (who is in the road).

 

I will use your comments and try to come up with some more tags. I knew it would be a tough one when I took it.  :)

 

I'm still unsure of this bird. It's odd that I can't find any others like it.

 

Small orange bird. Stock Photo
 

 

Like this one which I marked as young song thrush.

 

young-song-thrush-digitally-altered-dark

 

Allan

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35 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Like this one which I marked as young song thrush.

 

young-song-thrush-digitally-altered-dark

 

Allan

They are both ROBINS :)

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Thanks Clare and Allan.

 

I am in the process of looking at this now, both a Robin and Song Thrush.  :)  I cannot find a photo of any other Robin that looks like this as far as colouring goes, but the rest of it is very similar to a Robin. I have a few Song Thrush images myself, and they were larger than this bird but not by a lot and were adults, so I'm still wondering if it could be a young Song Thrush. The general look does fit, and it was perched where I've seen an adult Song Thrush very recently.

 

You seem very sure though Clare so you're probably right, but I'll keep investigating as I'm in 2 minds and want to be sure.  :)

 

Geoff.

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3 hours ago, Joe said:

Anyone recognize this flower? From a roadside tree here on Gran Canaria. I cycle

or run past the tree most mornings and any car parked under the tree is covered in them.

The flowers are yellow as they open on the tree.

 

http://www.alamy.com/image-details-popup.asp?&n=NaN&imageid={A95A25CF-DCF7-42EA-9532-C1A48734A6D6}

 

Thanks.

 

Joe

 

 

Hibiscus.

Only several hundred species to find the right one.

 

wim

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Thanks for confirming it Philippe. Googling using fledgling as well as robin found me others to compare with.

 

Greenies to Clare and Philippe.  :)

 

Geoff.

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I0000..9UI82kz78.jpg

 

Just appeared climbing up a wall in Malta, couldn't resist taking a snap. Is it worth submitting? What sort of gecko/lizard is it?

 

Probably 10-15 cms in length

 

Thanks for any help on this. 

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4 hours ago, wiskerke said:

 

Hibiscus.

Only several hundred species to find the right one.

 

wim

 

Thanks, Wim.

 

Joe

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Many thanks to Clair and Philippe for giving the correct species and greenies for both.

 

"IT IS A ROBIN Geoff"

 

Now to correct my keywords, sorry, tags.

 

Allan

 

 

Edited by Allan Bell

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Somehow I do not think combining all those different subjects into one single thread is making things simpler.

 

wim

 

 

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1 hour ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Many thanks to Clair and Philippe for giving the correct species and greenies for both.

 

"IT IS A ROBIN Geoff"

 

Now to correct my keywords, sorry, tags.

 

Allan

 

 

Oh wow, thanks so much Allan, I always knew you'd know the answer!  :D:P

 

 

56 minutes ago, wiskerke said:

Somehow I do not think combining all those different subjects into one single thread is making things simpler.

 

wim

 

 

I thought it was working ok? Although a sub-section of the forum just for ID's would be preferable.

 

Geoff.

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1 hour ago, GS-Images said:

 

Oh wow, thanks so much Allan, I always knew you'd know the answer!  :D:P

 

 

 

I thought it was working ok? Although a sub-section of the forum just for ID's would be preferable.

 

Geoff.

 

Yes it works. Simple? No.

 

Is there any of the questions that's still unanswered?

Not answered adequately enough?
 

wim

 

btw where did my quotes go?

 

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Just now, wiskerke said:

 

Yes it works. Simple? No.

 

Is there any of the questions that's still unanswered?

Not answered adequately enough?
 

wim

 

btw where did my quotes go?

 

 

Quotes of quotes don't appear now, only quotes, which I think is a good thing.

 

I have asked for a few ID's and they've all been answered. It isn't the best system, I agree, but I thought it would be less messy than lots of threads. I also thought it would help us feel more comfortable asking others. Some people (me included) get a bit nervous starting a new thread in case it isn't accepted by others. It's an anxiety thing, which I unfortunately know lots about.  :)  I feel a lot more confident in these forums than I used to though, as I feel I have come a along way.

 

Geoff.

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But to play devil's advocate here - sales resulting from correctly-identified species are very rare, a small market. Alamy buyers are generally not searching for correctly-spelled scientific names. Our world - or at least, mine - would be much easier if that was the case. :) 

 

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8 hours ago, LSP said:

Probably Hibiscus tiliaceous or related species. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hibiscus_tiliaceus

 

 

Yes I had an immediate association with Gauguin. ;-)

 

One of the traps we as a photographer often cannot avoid is to record the outlier in stead of the normal. (That's true for most media btw.)

So it can help identification if we take note whether the subject is a single occurrence or present in abundance.

 

wim

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13 minutes ago, arterra said:

If you expect that identification will be a problem, shoot also some details like close ups of the leaves, underside of fungi's heads, etc. Not to sell those pictures afterwards, but purely for identification purposes.

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

+ labels; street signs; name of the garden; park; guide book.

But the best advice: shoot the normal, but make it look really good.

 

wim

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12 hours ago, LSP said:

But to play devil's advocate here - sales resulting from correctly-identified species are very rare, a small market. Alamy buyers are generally not searching for correctly-spelled scientific names. Our world - or at least, mine - would be much easier if that was the case. :) 

 

It depends on the market.  For horticulture / gardening correct identification to species and (often) varietal level is essential.  I use both common names and full scientific nomenclature in my tags and description.  Why?  Well this list of search terms should give an idea:

 

Athyrium nipponicum

Athyrium nipponicum

Macleaya cordata

lonicera serotina

dianella

garden snowdrops [Land] [WOP] [DT] [UK]

angelica gigas

Salvia uliginosa

UK road rail [Pt] [DT] [UK]

Ceratostigma plumbaginoides

Eryngium yuccifolium

rose rhapsody in blue

Ceratostigma willmottianum

kniphofia rooperi [Pt]

Prunus ‘Amanogawa’

Geranium renardii

Hemerocallis Stella

garden snowdrop [Land] [WOP] [DT] [UK]

snowdrop garden [Land] [WOP] [DT] [UK]

deutzia scabra

 

Page 6 of the search terms for the last month in my pseudonym summary.  I chose that one at random.  The other 51 pages are pretty similar.

 

Edit to add:  I'm up to 60 sales so far this year.  Virtually all plant portraits.

Edited by John Richmond

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12 hours ago, LSP said:

But to play devil's advocate here - sales resulting from correctly-identified species are very rare, a small market. Alamy buyers are generally not searching for correctly-spelled scientific names. Our world - or at least, mine - would be much easier if that was the case. :) 

 

 

I disagree. I always use the scientific or Latin name for animals and plants, and often see searches in my views list for the scientific name. I think it's crucial to research that properly. If someone doesn't see searches for the scientific names in their views, it's because they don't use those words in their tags.  :)

 

Geoff.

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(red) soldier beetle. Some kind of hogweed - one of the plant specialists will be able to nail this, I'm sure.

 

Gareth

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It looks very similar to this....

Black Garlic flower (also Broad-leaved Onion or Allium Nigrum) in mid June in the UK. Stock Photo

 

Which I have identified as a Black Garlic flower (Allium Nigrum). I have no clue where I got that from though and it maybe wrong. I hope not, but I'm lately seeing how easy it is to get plants wrong and I worry that a lot of my older ones might be.

 

Actually the shape of the petals on mine looks more angled, whereas the petals on yours look to have more rounded edges.

 

Geoff.

 

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