GS-Images

Image identification

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1 minute ago, John Richmond said:

No 1 - Honey bee again on Eupatorium cannabinum

No 2 - more likely another cosmos

No 3 - Echinops ritro

 

Bored with ID'ing moths. ;)

 

Thanks for that John. I don't know why I just can't even get close to getting it right myself. It's very frustrating. 

 

Geoff.

 

 

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Frustration is all part of the learning process.  We all go through it.  I find my current drop of Bishop's Finger is a good cure. :)

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13 hours ago, John Richmond said:

 I find my current drop of Bishop's Finger is a good cure. :)

 

Oooohhh! Painful.:o

 

Sorry could not resist. I'll get my coat.

 

Allan

 

 

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Hi All. There is a mobile application named "PlantNet" running on IOS and may be on Android (developed by french scientists) which help to find the scientific name of a plant. 

Just make a photo of the part of the plant (leaf, flower, etc...),  tell the application what part it is, and launch the search. I did several successful tests. 

 

Hope this helps.

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4 hours ago, Southmind said:

Hi All. There is a mobile application named "PlantNet" running on IOS and may be on Android (developed by french scientists) which help to find the scientific name of a plant. 

Just make a photo of the part of the plant (leaf, flower, etc...),  tell the application what part it is, and launch the search. I did several successful tests. 

 

Hope this helps.

 

Thanks for letting us know. I used to use a different app where it cost 50p (UK pence) per ID, which was done by real humans rather than a computer. They got a lot wrong though unfortunately so i don't trust them any more.

 

This is very likely another Cosmos bipinnatus, yea? I currently have it as an African Daisy. I did that with another recently, and I know why I'm getting confused! I'll change it now (it's only been up a few days thank goodness) but if John or anyone else can confirm it's a Cosmos please, I'd be grateful.

K42D0M.jpg

 

Geoff.

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34 minutes ago, GS-Images said:

 

Thanks for letting us know. I used to use a different app where it cost 50p (UK pence) per ID, which was done by real humans rather than a computer. They got a lot wrong though unfortunately so i don't trust them any more.

 

This is very likely another Cosmos bipinnatus, yea? I currently have it as an African Daisy. I did that with another recently, and I know why I'm getting confused! I'll change it now (it's only been up a few days thank goodness) but if John or anyone else can confirm it's a Cosmos please, I'd be grateful.

K42D0M.jpg

 

Geoff.

 

 

ok, this one is free and there is also a WEB site (http://identify.plantnet-project.org/). I believe the identification is made both by computers and social network.

 

It seems you are right about Cosmos :(see the image in the bottom-left corner)

 

 

http://identify.plantnet-project.org/species/useful/Cosmos bipinnatus Cav. 

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13 minutes ago, Southmind said:

 

 

ok, this one is free and there is also a WEB site (http://identify.plantnet-project.org/). I believe the identification is made both by computers and social network.

 

It seems you are right about Cosmos :(see the image in the bottom-left corner)

 

 

http://identify.plantnet-project.org/species/useful/Cosmos bipinnatus Cav. 

 

Yep I'm sure it's a Cosmos and the link you gave backs that up, so thanks for that.

 

I'll definitely check out that app (if I can get it on Android) and website and will give it a go, maybe with a flower I've already got and ID for and see if it agrees.  :)

 

Geoff.

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13 hours ago, GS-Images said:

A fruit fly? Go on, tell me I'm right, it's a fruit fly, right?  :D

 

http://c1.alamy.com/zooms/e433d129-ae0e-456d-b56e-16da5e30e63d/K3WH57.jpg

 

It's not a fruit fly.  Looks far more like a Muscid (Muscidae) house fly.  Lots of different ones that look similar so I can't give you a better idea.

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5 hours ago, John Richmond said:

It's not a fruit fly.  Looks far more like a Muscid (Muscidae) house fly.  Lots of different ones that look similar so I can't give you a better idea.

 

Thanks John. I just can't get it right no matter what. It drives me crazy.

 

Geoff.

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Purple Thistle of some sort? It's a focus-stacked macro shot, so is very small. I'd say around 2cm diameter for the whole thing, which was growing in the same flowerbed as various African Daisies. I also have another new one that I'm trying to identify but it's quite unique so I'm going to keep trying myself, as it should be quite an easy one. Once I'm 95% sure I'll post and ask for confirmation.  :)  This purple one below though is going to be tricky for me to be sure about. I do have other shots of several of them growing together, if it helps with an ID.

 

K56R07.jpg

 

Geoff.

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25 minutes ago, GS-Images said:

Purple Thistle of some sort? It's a focus-stacked macro shot, so is very small. I'd say around 2cm diameter for the whole thing, which was growing in the same flowerbed as various African Daisies. I also have another new one that I'm trying to identify but it's quite unique so I'm going to keep trying myself, as it should be quite an easy one. Once I'm 95% sure I'll post and ask for confirmation.  :)  This purple one below though is going to be tricky for me to be sure about. I do have other shots of several of them growing together, if it helps with an ID.

 

K56R07.jpg

 

Geoff.

Ageratum.  It will be one of the seed strains - some are taller than others.

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3 minutes ago, John Richmond said:

Ageratum.  It will be one of the seed strains - some are taller than others.

 

Thanks John. Yet again I got it wrong. I found a photo from someone else that looked identical to mine, and claimed it was a purple thistle. I looked up Ageratum and straight away I see many that look like mine.

 

I'm still trying to find that other one I mentioned. I won't ask about any others until I know myself what this other one is. I'm angry at myself for being so useless at this and I'm determined to do at least one myself and be sure about it, for my own satisfaction.

 

Geoff.

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56 minutes ago, GS-Images said:

 

Thanks John. Yet again I got it wrong. I found a photo from someone else that looked identical to mine, and claimed it was a purple thistle. I looked up Ageratum and straight away I see many that look like mine.

 

I'm still trying to find that other one I mentioned. I won't ask about any others until I know myself what this other one is. I'm angry at myself for being so useless at this and I'm determined to do at least one myself and be sure about it, for my own satisfaction.

 

Geoff.

Took me a few moments to recognise it.  Not because I don't know the plants - I've grown them myself in the past - but because the low angle and close up shot is not the classic depiction of Ageratum species and varieties.  Which could be a problem for potential sales.  Will buyers dismiss the image because it doesn't look like all the other shots, or will they take a closer look because it doesn't look like all the other shots?  Does it pay to be different?  Probably a subject for a different thread.

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Just now, John Richmond said:

Took me a few moments to recognise it.  Not because I don't know the plants - I've grown them myself in the past - but because the low angle and close up shot is not the classic depiction of Ageratum species and varieties.  Which could be a problem for potential sales.  Will buyers dismiss the image because it doesn't look like all the other shots, or will they take a closer look because it doesn't look like all the other shots?  Does it pay to be different?  Probably a subject for a different thread.

 

Good point, and it's intentional to show it from a unique perspective using a macro lens, so I'm hoping a potential client will like that different detailed view of it. I have other shots too with a more traditional view, which may or may not be worth uploading. I'm still working through my backlog (culled over 500 today!), and STILL trying to identify this other plant I mentioned. Also spent 4-5 hours today working on just one image of a plant that I'm sure I'll have to ask for ID of at some point. As always, I'm having big problems perfecting the background and it's still not finished. :)

 

Geoff.

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Can you help me with this plant?

 

Plant - Stock Image

 

 

image ID: K5HE1R
Thanks

Radim

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Well I give up. What I think is that it's an African Daisy, as it was planted in a flowerbed with several other cultivars of African Daisy. I have found many others by Googling that look a little similar, but none that are identical. I thought this would be easy to ID because of it's distinctive look, with spiky petals. Some African Daisies do look a bit similar, but none that I've found have petals shaped quite as pointy as this one. It was smaller than the other flowers that I know were African Daisies, at around 3cm diameter. I'm guessing a cultivar couldn't be given but if it's definitely an African Daisy, I'll keyword it as "Purple African Daisy with pointed petals", or something like that.  :)

 

K56R06.jpg

 

[Edit] I wanted to add some dragonflies too if that's ok. I can only hope that I have some of these details right this time! I won't put them on sale until I'm sure.

 

I think these are all Common Darter Dragonflies (Sympetrum striolatum). I'm going by the eyes, yellow stripes on legs, wing markings, and the general look and colouring.

 

This first one, I'm guessing is an immature male.

K633HB.jpg

 

This one looks to be an adult female, but the bits at the end of the wing (pterostigma) are brown, which indicates a male. So.....adult male?

K633H7.jpg

 

This next one I'm less sure about. It looks more like a Black Darter, but there are yellow stripes on the legs just like the others and apparently Black Darters have all-black legs, so I think this must be a Common Darter, and in that case I'd go with an adult male. Like the last one, I first thought it was female, but the brown rather than blue pterostigma tells me it's male.

K633HD.jpg

 

Thanks,

Geoff.

Edited by GS-Images

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12 hours ago, Radim said:

Can you help me with this plant?

 

Plant - Stock Image

 

 

image ID: K5HE1R
Thanks

Radim

I'd like to help but that one defeats me.  My first thoughts where that it was bistort, Persicaria bistorta, but the basal foliage and lack of leaves up the stem rule that out.  Is it a Czech wild flower or a garden plant.  How tall is it?

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11 hours ago, GS-Images said:

Well I give up. What I think is that it's an African Daisy, as it was planted in a flowerbed with several other cultivars of African Daisy. I have found many others by Googling that look a little similar, but none that are identical. I thought this would be easy to ID because of it's distinctive look, with spiky petals. Some African Daisies do look a bit similar, but none that I've found have petals shaped quite as pointy as this one. It was smaller than the other flowers that I know were African Daisies, at around 3cm diameter. I'm guessing a cultivar couldn't be given but if it's definitely an African Daisy, I'll keyword it as "Purple African Daisy with pointed petals", or something like that.  :)

 

K56R06.jpg

 

[Edit] I wanted to add some dragonflies too if that's ok. I can only hope that I have some of these details right this time! I won't put them on sale until I'm sure.

 

I think these are all Common Darter Dragonflies (Sympetrum striolatum). I'm going by the eyes, yellow stripes on legs, wing markings, and the general look and colouring.

 

This first one, I'm guessing is an immature male.

K633HB.jpg

 

This one looks to be an adult female, but the bits at the end of the wing (pterostigma) are brown, which indicates a male. So.....adult male?

K633H7.jpg

 

This next one I'm less sure about. It looks more like a Black Darter, but there are yellow stripes on the legs just like the others and apparently Black Darters have all-black legs, so I think this must be a Common Darter, and in that case I'd go with an adult male. Like the last one, I first thought it was female, but the brown rather than blue pterostigma tells me it's male.

K633HD.jpg

 

Thanks,

Geoff.

I certainly agree that your flower is an Osteospermum.  Some of the whirligig varieties (the ones with spoon shaped petals) can revert to a more normal shape.  This may be the case.

 

Common darters, Sympetrum striolatum, for all three dragonflies.  Males deepen in colour as they mature but there is a range of variability in the intermediate shades.  Top two are probably males.  Third one probably female. The pterostigma colour is not an accurate guide to gender.  You probably can't see it in the shot below but both sexes have brown pterostigma.  Not much doubt that they're mature (and consenting) adults!

 

red-male-and-blue-green-female-common-darters-sympetrum-striolatum-F192A5.jpg

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Anyone know anything about pears? Some online research suggested that these are seckel pears, but would like to confirm.

its probably quite an old tree, in a garden of an old house with a variety of fruits trees in Scotland

close-up-of-sunlit-ripening-seckel-pears

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Telephone? Post office? Royal?

 

In Bergen, Norway.

 

I0000WTfNmcnz47E.jpg

 

 This picture has been hanging around since July 2016 - the very last one I have to do of Bergen.

 

Thanks in advance

Edited by geogphotos

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10 hours ago, John Richmond said:

I certainly agree that your flower is an Osteospermum.  Some of the whirligig varieties (the ones with spoon shaped petals) can revert to a more normal shape.  This may be the case.

 

Common darters, Sympetrum striolatum, for all three dragonflies.  Males deepen in colour as they mature but there is a range of variability in the intermediate shades.  Top two are probably males.  Third one probably female. The pterostigma colour is not an accurate guide to gender.  You probably can't see it in the shot below but both sexes have brown pterostigma.  Not much doubt that they're mature (and consenting) adults!

 

 

Many thanks again John, you really are incredibly helpful to me. I'm also quite pleased that I actually got most of that lot right before asking! I knew that day would come, I just wasn't sure when.  :lol:

 

I see what you mean about the pterostigma colours in the shot you posted. Not much better proof of your point than that, unless........Oh maybe I won't go there.  :D

 

Geoff.

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Hi geogphotos.

State telegraph and telephone company "Telegrafverket" from 1855 until it changed the name to "Televerket" in 1969. After 1994 it was privatized into Telenor ASA. Nothing to do with the postal services.

Grethe

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11 minutes ago, Grethe said:

Hi geogphotos.

State telegraph and telephone company "Telegrafverket" from 1855 until it changed the name to "Televerket" in 1969. After 1994 it was privatized into Telenor ASA. Nothing to do with the postal services.

Grethe

 

Thanks. I found the answer!

 

Telegrafen department store :lol:

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13 hours ago, John Richmond said:

I'd like to help but that one defeats me.  My first thoughts where that it was bistort, Persicaria bistorta, but the basal foliage and lack of leaves up the stem rule that out.  Is it a Czech wild flower or a garden plant.  How tall is it?

Hi John

 

The plant grows in a botanical garden,
Unfortunately no label or gardener nearby
You are right that the flowers are similar to the Persicaria plant,
Grows on poor soil together with Sarracenia and other carnivorous plants
Plant height about 50 cm

Thank you for the message, I welcome every idea,
Perhaps the lost Philippe could help 

 

Radim

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