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AlessandraRC

Nikon D7100 anyone?

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Well, I am not big on gear. I don't make enough money to justify fancy cameras, but try to get good lenses. Well, my Nikon D3100  is in the brinks of dying. I have cogitated a lot about what to buy next, and have decided to stay with Nikon cropped sensor camera for a while longer. Doing some research I arrived at the D7100, an older model that seems to have all I need. I wonder if others here have had experience with that camera since It's been in the market for a while, and would like to share pls.  :)

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Hi Alessandra,

In the last year I purchased a new D7100 to use as a dedicated body for my long lens, replacing my trusty old D200 (which by the way is still working fine!). I wanted a larger sensor in case I wanted to crop in a little and still have a file big enough to submit to Alamy. For the most part it gives results very similar to those of my D200, including being somewhat noisy at ISO's over 400, which was kind of disappointing. The large monitor on the back is nice as well as the ability to take video. They can be bought for a bargain too, although there are some counterfeits out their. I actually spent a bit of time researching how to identify a counterfeit as I purchased mine from an Amazon seller (which I don't normally do for just this reason).  

Hope this helps,

Chris

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I am quite happy with my D7100, which I've been using for about 18 months.  I bought it new (just the body).  It was a significant upgrade from my D5100.  Some of the improved features I like include having most of the camera controls on the outside, rather than being so menu driven.  It has better weather proofing, it can be used with more lenses, it can fine tune the focus of my lenses, and has fantastic image quality.  The images in my port are either taken with my D7100 or my sony rx100.

 

Maria

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The D7100 is a fantastic camera,  and  at  24mp vs 10mp a vast, vast  improvement on the D200 ( i've owned and used both for many years),  - although discontinued the D7100l still hold its own against newer rivals.

 

it will produce excellent images up to 1250 iso , the proof is here... 

 

http://garyksmithphotography.blogspot.co.uk/2017/03/owls-well-that-ends-well.html

 

Gary

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I use two D7000s, bought recently secondhand - a little older and even cheaper. They do everything I want them to do. I have also used D200, D300, D3200 and D5100 in the past and what I use now combines the best bits of all of them. Very good controls, excellent results, useful things like fine focus tuning and 6 fps.

I can only imagine that the D7100 (and D7200) are much the same but slightly better.

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I have the D7100 and have for 2 or 3 years. It's excellent and gives extremely sharp results (if the lens is high quality too of course) due to the lack of an AA filter over the sensor. When it was launched it had the best AF system Nikon made for their most expensive DSLR camera. No complaints about it at all. The D7200 is a very limited upgrade and not worth it in my opinion, and the new D7500 is a DOWNgrade. The D7100 is still the best Nikon cropped camera for the price, in my opinion.The D500 looks to be an amazing camera but it's cost is way too much, and it's main plus point is FPS - Which is of no help to me at all.

 

For the foreseeable future I've given up thinking of getting a FF camera. I simply need the extra perceived reach that a cropped sensor provides. Even with my 600mm lens I need more reach, so I don't want to give that up by going for a FF camera. Noise is an issue at times but the advantages outweigh the disadvantages. Also I now have 2 of the sharpest lenses you can buy, both specifically for cropped sensor cameras and I wouldn't want to give them up.

 

My ideal camera would be a cropped frame similar to the D7100 but with a few more megapixels, maybe 32MP, as my lenses are sharp enough that more of a crop factor would be handy for bird shots. That's another reason I'm against the D7500 as the sensor has less MP - Not by much, but it's enough to put me off. Another thing I'd like would be more cross-type AF points, as the D7100 only has 15 I think, and all bunched together in the middle.

 

Geoff.

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The D7100 is a fantastic camera,  and  at  24mp vs 10mp a vast, vast  improvement on the D200 ( i've owned and used both for many years),  - although discontinued the D7100l still hold its own against newer rivals.

 

it will produce excellent images up to 1250 iso , the proof is here... 

 

http://garyksmithphotography.blogspot.co.uk/2017/03/owls-well-that-ends-well.html

 

Gary

 

Mine will go to a max of ISO 3200 and look fine IF the light just right for it. It can also show too much noise at ISO 200 if the light is wrong. I'm honestly yet to be confident predicting what is good light for noise, and what is poor! Often the results don't make much logical sense to me. Usually I don't go above ISO 400, but I stretch it to ISO 800 if I really need to. Sometimes those are usable, sometimes not.

 

Geoff.

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I have the D7100 and wish I had held off until the D7200 came along. The D7100 has a tiny buffer and can be frustrating for wildlife action. Had an opportunity with a jaguar in the Pantanal (I'm sure you know where that is) and lost some shots when my buffer kept filling up. The only other problem I've had with it is the buttons on the back that give quick access to change settings but I wound up with an accidental change to only shooting jpeg at one point. Took me a while to notice the change so I don't have RAW of some shots. I have the D500 now and adore it. It is much better for wildlife in my opinion. I still use the D7100 and get good results.

 

Paulette

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I have a D7000 and really like it but it isn't without it's faults as mentioned above. Notably:

 

  • Above ISO 400, noise can be noticeable. At ISO 800, I know I am going to have to use Lightroom to remove noise in parts of a photo and/or downsize the images.
  • The buffer is small and it is frustrating when trying to take action shots.

 

The D7100 I would like to think is an improvement over my camera so might not suffer as badly from the above points but other comments suggest that the issues are the same.

But i do love my D7000 and my next upgrade would probably be another camera from the D7xxx family.

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The D7200 does have a good amount of space in the buffer. At the time I bought the D7100 I had given up on an upgrade from the D300. If I had known the D7200 would solve my buffer problem I would have waited. I was thrilled when the D500 came along. Those of us who had the D300 were frustrated for years waiting for the next step and the D500 has been the answer for us.

 

Paulette

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I have the D7100 and wish I had held off until the D7200 came along. The D7100 has a tiny buffer and can be frustrating for wildlife action. Had an opportunity with a jaguar in the Pantanal (I'm sure you know where that is) and lost some shots when my buffer kept filling up. The only other problem I've had with it is the buttons on the back that give quick access to change settings but I wound up with an accidental change to only shooting jpeg at one point. Took me a while to notice the change so I don't have RAW of some shots. I have the D500 now and adore it. It is much better for wildlife in my opinion. I still use the D7100 and get good results.

 

Paulette

 

Yes I know where that is quite well. Frustrating to miss that due to buffer!

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Fabulous place. I did get good ones but not as many as I could have. I love being where the wild ones live.

 

Paulette

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Make the jump to the D800,  In my opinion one of the best camera's NIKON has ever made.

Wonderful at 1600 and a 7360 by to crop from.  In my opinion the great NIKON's were the

SP, F, N-90, D100 and now the D800.  One of my favorite DSLR's in the early days were the

FUJI S2 and then the S5. 

 

Unfortunatly for me the used or reconditioned D800's have held

there value, still expensive, while the D700, still a very competitive DSLR can be had for a

resonable fee.

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Make the jump to the D800,  In my opinion one of the best camera's NIKON has ever made.

Wonderful at 1600 and a 7360 by to crop from.  In my opinion the great NIKON's were the

SP, F, N-90, D100 and now the D800.  One of my favorite DSLR's in the early days were the

FUJI S2 and then the S5. 

 

Unfortunatly for me the used or reconditioned D800's have held

there value, still expensive, while the D700, still a very competitive DSLR can be had for a

resonable fee.

 

 

 

Yes I though much about the D800 (it has been discontinued by Nikon) and will consider this in one year or so. The problem is, to make it worth the investment, I will need those wonderful FX lenses, and sales are not good enough right now to justify  ;) Then also I am small and weak, need to work out more to be able to carry the weight. 

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Fabulous place. I did get good ones but not as many as I could have. I love being where the wild ones live.

 

Paulette

 

MOSQUITOES ABOUND

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Make the jump to the D800,  In my opinion one of the best camera's NIKON has ever made.

Wonderful at 1600 and a 7360 by to crop from.  In my opinion the great NIKON's were the

SP, F, N-90, D100 and now the D800.  One of my favorite DSLR's in the early days were the

FUJI S2 and then the S5. 

 

Unfortunatly for me the used or reconditioned D800's have held

there value, still expensive, while the D700, still a very competitive DSLR can be had for a

resonable fee.

 

 

 

Yes I though much about the D800 (it has been discontinued by Nikon) and will consider this in one year or so. The problem is, to make it worth the investment, I will need those wonderful FX lenses, and sales are not good enough right now to justify  ;) Then also I am small and weak, need to work out more to be able to carry the weight. 

 

 

I think you should be thinking about what type of photography you want to be doing and make your choice of camera based on that. Do you need a full frame camera? I would say definitely yes if you want to shoot stuff  that requires a good wideangle lens (e.g. landscapes and architecture). Why? - because you can get an excellent Nikkor or third party 24mm lens for a reasonable price that will act as a 24 mm and not as a 36mm. To get the same quality in DX, you need to be getting a 17mm and they are very expensive for decent ones (as are decent wideangle zooms).

 

If you decide on full frame, then you don't need to be thinking D800 or the even better D810 (personal experience). The D750 is a fantastic camera (personal experience) and a lot cheaper and the D610 which I have never used also has an excellent reputation. As for weight, the biggest weight difference you would notice is going from a D3100 to a D7100 (about 400g to 675g). The D610 and D750 are only about 750g so the difference is basically insignificant (75g). There is a huge range of very good lightweight used Nikkor prime lenses available.

 

If you decide to stay with DX format, perhaps consider the D3400 which performs incredibly well in DxO tests rather than a secondhand D7100. You should notice a huge improvement in image quality going from the D3100 to either camera. The sensors in the more recent DX cameras are incredibly good according to the tests.

Edited by MDM

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In the US at least, one cannot buy this camera new from anywhere, it is out of stock... :blink:

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It's an older model (2013) and it's been replaced twice.

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It's an old (obsolete??) model.. it's been superceeded by both the D7200 and D7500 so I'm not too surprised.

If you specifically want a D7100, you're probably going to have to buy it secondhand.

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2 hours ago, AlessandraRC said:

In the US at least, one cannot buy this camera new from anywhere, it is out of stock... :blink:

Alessandra, B&H has the new D7200 and, as I mentioned in a previous post, I wish I had bought that one rather than the D7100. It is more expensive than the refurbished D7100 but the buffer size is much, much better and I think they made other improvements while keeping the same size, etc. There are some advantages to getting a refurbished model of a camera in my opinion. The company would have thoroughly tested that specific camera and that is not necessarily the case with a new one. So I wouldn't be afraid of the refurbished D7100 that they have at B&H,

 

Paulette

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On 2/6/2017 at 05:31, GS-Images said:

Also I now have 2 of the sharpest lenses you can buy, both specifically for cropped sensor cameras

 

Hi Geoff! I also have the D7100 and want to upgrade my lenses (I have the 18-140 mm from the kit and a nikkor 50mm 1.8) 

Which ones do you have? I'm looking to improve the sharpness of my images.

 

Thank you!

Karina

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Hi Karina. I have the Sigma 18-35mm f1.8 Art, and the Sigma 50-100mm f1.8 Art. They are quite expensive and the 50-100mm is nearly as heavy as my 150-600mm! It gives fantastic results though and I think both of them are worth the money.

 

Geoff.

 

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Thank you very much Geoff!! I will look into them.

Best!

Karina

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