M.Chapman

Verified
  • Content count

    1,137
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

525 Forum reputation = excellent

About M.Chapman

  • Rank
    Forum regular

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male

Alamy

  • Alamy URL
    http://www.alamy.com/contrib-browse.asp?cid={72CEF26C-BD33-43B9-830D-8FE28CE464C7}&name=Mark+Chapman
  • Images
    3340
  • Joined Alamy
    12 Jan 2010
  1. Because they see falling image prices as a threat to their incomes and blame it on micro-stock and "micro-stockers". IMHO micro-stock is only one of the factors. There are numerous others. - Digital cameras and phones make it much easier to take decent pictures - Many publications are moving on-line and so are happy with lower resolution images anyway - This has caused a massive increase in image supply. - Although demand for images also risen (on-line publication), the demand for high quality/resolution images has fallen - Intense competition between agencies puts buyers in a strong position and stock image prices fall accordingly Only the most efficient agencies, or those with a distinctive/unique product offering are likely to survive. Mark
  2. Agreed - providing that display is viewed from a distance and with eyesight that can just see the individual pixels.
  3. Interesting. What sort of monitor are you using? If it's one of those very high pixel density displays e.g. 4k or Retina then your images may appear sharper than they are. The "image must appear sharp when viewed at 100%" rule assumes that the viewer has sufficiently good eyesight and is viewing at a distance where they can resolve individual image pixels. if you have a high pixel density display where you can't see the individual pixels you nay need to inspect at 200%. Alternatively check your monitor isn't applying any sharpening. Mark
  4. OIC. In the UK Bing maps (as opposed to Google Maps) has an Ordnance Survey map option which is brilliant for the UK. Suggest having a look what options Bing Maps provides elsewhere in the world in case they have similar. Mark
  5. anyone have experience of copytrack

    Maybe they're building a photo-library from all those uploaded (unwatermarked?) images. Mark
  6. Do we need to worry about the map? Are Alamy extracting geotag coordinates from it? I don't think so. (The latest metadata spreadsheet they sent me of my data only includes a 150 character location field, and no geotag data). I sometimes find Google maps enters an inadequate description of the location or freezes, in which case I enter my own location and ignore the map. What if you just want to enter just England for example (for items where the precise location is irrelevant). Google maps then sticks a pin in the geographic centre of England, must be one of the most photographed places! Mark
  7. Pseudonym

    Agreed Mark
  8. Pseudonym

    Is that what I said? I think Alamy measures provides a historic log of which images were zoomed/viewed/sold, and captures the details (e.g. the Pseudo) at that time. You won't see any entries for your new pseudo until the log has recorded some views/zooms/sales for images that occurred after you swapped them to the new pseudo. That's my theory anyway.... Mark
  9. Pseudonym

    I'm not certain but I think only zooms and views that happen after you created the new Pseudo will appear. I seem to recall swapping my images to a new pseudo once and I lost all my zoom and views info for them. Maybe others can confirm? Mark
  10. 100% agree. In the OP shot the boat is too prominent a feature occupying major areas of the frame to be regarded as unimportant (from a sharpness viewpoint). Mark
  11. Thanks for posting the 100% image. I agree with others, at 100% size it looks too soft to me, with the foreground boat being the softest. Downsizing to 3000 x 2000 makes the buildings look better, but the foreground boat is still too soft. Could be movement of the boat, or just that the point of focus is too far away and there's not enough depth of field at F6.3. IMHO. Mark
  12. If you're happy with their T&Cs you could upload a full size image for free here, then copy and paste the link the site provides to the uploaded image into your Alamy forum posting. You should then get more reliable comments on your image. Also suggest making a note of the delete image link for future reference, or set an expiration period. Mark
  13. I couldn't help chuckling when I read this sentence in the job advert... We are faced with a fascinating, intellectually demanding challenge of understanding the behaviour of search engines, crawling and indexing and understanding customer behaviour on our site. We are looking for a bright person to help us meet this challenge. Will they be starting with gaining an understanding of how their own search/ranking engine works?? Hopefully the search engine is now finally working the way Alamy intended when they introduced the algorithm changes over 6 months ago, but it's taken a heck of a long time to get there. Still, looking on the bright side, it sounds like they are still investing in making improvements. Nevertheless I hope any future search engine revisions are more thoroughly tested before going live. Note to new recruit - Action 1 - Set up a parallel test system so that changes can be fully tested offline. (Sorry, am I being a bit sceptical?) Mark (anxiously awaiting impact of latest changes as highly rated captions were very good for me)
  14. Happy fun images...and a few random ones

    Seems to be a theme to the "random" images hereabouts? Mark (just going with the flow)